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Hazard Communication, Lab Safety and Regulated Waste Awareness Training

Hazard Communication, Lab Safety and Regulated Waste Awareness Training

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Hazard Communication, Lab Safety and Regulated Waste Awareness Training

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  1. Hazard Communication, Lab Safety and Regulated Waste Awareness Training Office of Environmental Health and Safety Hunter College of CUNY

  2. Overview • Understanding mandates of a. Hazard Communication(29 CFR 1910.1200) , b. Lab Safety Standard or Occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in laboratories(29 CFR 1910.1450)and c. Hazardous Waste Awareness by EPA’sResource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

  3. Hazard Communication = Right-To- Know Training OSHA’s Hazard Communication or Right-To-Know

  4. Hazard Communication • Hazard communication (3 W’s and One H) Do you know: 1.Where to find information concerning the hazards of the chemicals present in your work area? 2. When to use a laboratory chemical hood? 3. How to select appropriate eye protection? What about gloves? 4. What to do in case you are involved in a fire or chemical emergency? • These are information that you need to know to help you do your work in the safest manner possible. • It is also information that you have a right to know under OSHA standards enacted to protect your health and safety through better communication, better training, and better work practices.

  5. OSHA’s Hazard Communication Program • The Hazard Communication Standard was created to: • Ensure that the hazards of all chemicals produced or imported are evaluated, • Transmit all information to all employees.

  6. Information Requirements • Employees must be informed of: • Requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard. Employer: Notification, Information, Record-keeping • Health effects (Acute Vs. Chronic) • Operations in work areas where there are hazardous chemicals. Labs, shops, storage and preparation rooms. • Location/availability of written Hazard Communication Program. EHS Office at HE-1211A

  7. Training Requirements • Employees must be trained on the following: • Methods to detect the presence. (Labels, MSDS) • Physical and health hazards of chemicals in work area. (Health, Flammability, Reactivity, etc.) • Personal protection

  8. Where will you find chemicals at Hunter College of CUNY? • Cleaning supplies • Bleach, ammonia, detergents • Paint Shop • Paints, paint thinners and strippers • Laboratories • Assorted chemicals and chemical waste • Mechanical Rooms / Boiler Rooms • Oils, grease, cleaners

  9. Material Safety Data Sheets(MSDS)

  10. Material Safety Data Sheets A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is a valuable reference. • IMPORTANT: Consult an MSDS before introducing a new chemical into a lab protocol or working with hazardous substances. • You should become familiar with MSDS of a Chemical/Material you are working with. • You may request copies of these materials from your supervisor or from the Office of Environmental Health and Safety.

  11. Where can you find an MSDS for a chemical? • An MSDS MUST be available anywhere a chemical is used or stored • Each person must know how and where to find an MSDS in the immediate area • An MSDS should be included with the purchase of a chemical. Many are available online. • Ask EH&S if you have having difficulty locating an MSDS or getting one from a manufacturer. IMPORTANT: Refer to www.hunter.cuny.edu/ehs and click MSDS Icon to search for a copy of a material’s MSDS.

  12. Sections of MSDS • Product Identification / Ingredients • Hazards • First Aid • Fire Fighting • Release Measures • Handling / Storage • Personal Protection Equipment • Physical / Chemical Properties • Toxicology • Disposal / Transport Information

  13. Product Identification / Ingredients • Chemical name, trade name, synonyms • CAS (Chemical Abstract Service) Number • Molecular Formula / Molecular Weight • Ingredients and Percentages

  14. Hazards • Warning Phrases • Danger! Flammable! Corrosive! • NFPA Ratings (0-4) for Health, Flammability, Reactivity, Special/Other • Potential Health Effects • Inhalation, skin contact, ingestion, chronic exposure

  15. First Aid • Information on what do in case of an exposure by • Inhalation • Ingestion • Skin Contact • Eye Contact

  16. Fire Fighting Information • Flash point • Auto ignition temperature • Type of fire extinguisher to use

  17. Handling/Storage • Ideal/preferred storage conditions (humidity and temperature) • Ventilation • Store away from incompatibles • Flammables / Corrosives cabinets

  18. PPE Know what Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is available and where to get it. • Gloves • Eye protection (safety glasses, goggles) • Apron / coveralls • And Sometimes, Respiratory Protection Some people may be sensitive or allergic to latex gloves…

  19. Physical / Chemical Properties • Color • Odor • Specific Gravity • pH • Boiling & Melting Points • Vapor Density & Pressure • Solubility • Decomposition Products / Polymerization • Incompatibilities

  20. Toxicology • Hazardous substancesIt is especially important to consult the Material Safety Data Sheets when working with substances that OSHA has classified as "health hazards." These include:Carcinogens. Substances that may cause cancer in humans and animals under certain conditions. An example is chromic acid.Corrosives. Substances that cause visible destruction or permanent change to skin tissue on contact. An example is hydrochloric acid.Hepatotoxins. Substances that may cause damage to the liver. An example is chloroform.Mutagens. Substances that may cause changes in the genetic material of cells. An example is ethidium bromide.Nephrotoxins. Substances that may cause damage to the kidneys. An example is acetonitrile.Neurotoxins. Substances that are harmful to the nervous system. An example is acrylamide.Teratogens. Substances that may affect the development of an embryo or fetus. An example is formamide.

  21. Disposal / Transport • DOT shipping information • RCRA hazardous waste information and waste codes

  22. Release Measures • Measures to take if this material is released to the environment • Reportable Quantities • Coast Guard National Response Center (NRC) 1-800-424-8802

  23. Medical conditions and symptoms • Medical conditions and symptoms- You should talk with your supervisor or doctor if you are working with hazardous chemicals and- You are taking medication.- You are pregnant.- You have a medical condition such as chronic allergy.And, always see your physician if you develop symptoms or an illness that could be associated with your laboratory work.

  24. Consulting safety data sheets • Consulting safety data sheetsExample: MSDS for Chromic Acid

  25. Labels • Every bottle ordered and received should come with an affixed label containing: • Name of product and constituents • Hazards • Manufacturer’s Name and CAS Number

  26. NFPA Hazard Diamond CUNY HazCom

  27. User Labeling • EVERY bottle must be labeled to identify its contents (even soap and water, if there is no original label) • You may use a piece of tape, a sharpie, or print out a label • As long as it is clearly legible and includes the commonly recognized name of the contents (not the chemical formula) and its hazard(s) Rubbing Alcohol Flammable

  28. Chemical Storage • Chemical storageSafe storage of chemicals is a necessity in every laboratory. It will: - Provide for effective management of chemicals. - Lessen the risk of fire. - Prevent accidental mixing of incompatible chemicals in emergencies. - Minimize exposure to corrosive and toxic chemicals.Safe chemical storage may seem to be a matter of common sense. Yet in fact, it requires an awareness of each chemical's potential hazards, and a lot of thought.

  29. Rules of thumb for safe storage • Rules of thumb for safe storage 1. Store chemicals that can ignite at room temperature in a flammables cabinet. If flammable chemicals require cold storage, store only in refrigerators approved for such use. 2. Storage areas for corrosive, toxic, flammable, and highly reactive chemicals should be near a laboratory chemical hood to encourage use of the hood when transferring chemicals. 3. Store only cleaning materials directly under the sink. 4. Never store liquid hazardous chemicals above eye level. 5. Store heavy chemical containers on lower shelves, not on the floor. 6. Store chemicals on shelves with raised edges.

  30. WARNING-PEROXIDE FORMER This material will form explosive peroxides during storage and must not be kept for more than _____months after opening.(see Peroxide Policy at http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/ehs) Date Received_____________Date Opened _____________Discard unopened container 12 months after receipt. Call EH&S at ext. 4462 for disposal. DO NOT USE IF OPENED MORE THAN ________MONTHS. Safe Storage Handling and Disposal of Peroxide-Forming Chemicals - Do not store more chemicals than you will need over a reasonable period. - Peroxide-forming chemicals should be labeled showing (Date of Receipt, Date of Opening). Use this label: - Never store highly reactive chemicals for longer than 6 months. - Never store a chemical with an obscured or missing label. - Separate chemicals into compatible groups and store alphabetically within the groups. - Designate separate storage areas for highly toxic chemicals.

  31. Dry Chemical Storage • Dry chemical storage Dry chemicals can be stored together. To ensure compatibility, keep organic and inorganic chemicals segregated. • Liquid chemical storage The first step is to determine the major storage groups such as acids, bases, flammables, oxidizers, and highly toxic chemicals. • Acids. Acids should be stored in trays that will catch any spill and provide adequate segregation. • Organic acids, organic bases, and flammables. Organic acids and organic bases may be stored with the flammables, but acid resistant plastic trays must carefully segregate them. • Oxidizers. Oxidizers are highly reactive. They should be separated from other chemicals.  

  32. Highly toxic chemicals • Highly toxic chemicals - Toxic materials like carcinogens and reproductive hazards should be stored in a separate cabinet.- Volatile toxic materials should be stored in an enclosure.- An inventory should be kept of all highly toxic and highly reactive chemicals.

  33. PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) Always protect your eyesSafety glasses with side eye shields, splash goggles, and full face shields offer varying degrees of protection against splattering chemicals and airborne objects. Choose safety glasses with side eye shields when there is a splash hazard with a small quantity of a hazardous chemical.

  34. PPE (Goggles, Face shields) • GogglesWear goggles when you are handling a chemical that is highly caustic or in a larger volume, perhaps a liter or more.Face shieldsWear a face shield when you are handling a very large volume of a hazardous chemical, or when you need to protect your face and your eyes.

  35. PPE (Gloves) • GlovesWearing gloves is a simple and effective way to protect yourself from chemical contact, but the gloves must be resistant to the specific chemical with which you are working.No glove material is impermeable to all chemicals, therefore, the most effective practice in using protective gloves is to change them frequently and whenever they are contaminated.

  36. Emergency Procedures • Emergency Procedures Eye Splash 15 mins eye shower, keep lids open, consult a physician/opthalmologist. Chemical spill on clothes remove contaminated clothes, activate emergency shower, remove shoes, consult a physician.

  37. Lab Safety Standard Training Lab Safety Standard or Occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in laboratories(29 CFR 1910.1450)

  38. OSHA Lab Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1450. • A standard (may 1, 1990) for occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in industrial, clinical and academic laboratories • Provide work practices, procedures and policies to ensure the protection of employees from potentially hazardous chemicals in use in their work area. • Requires a Chemical Hygiene Plan

  39. Chemical Hygiene Plan • Chemical Hygiene PlanHunter College has a written Chemical Hygiene Plan. The Plan conveys the hazards of chemicals which may be present in your work area, and describes appropriate work practices, procedures and controls which are in place to protect you from those hazards.You should become familiar with the Chemical Hygiene Plan or other laboratory safety documents. You may request copies of these materials from: 1) supervisor or 2) Environmental Health and Safety office.

  40. What is a Hazardous Chemical? Two Types of Hazards • Physical Hazard • Flammables/Combustibles • Corrosives • Reactives • Health Hazard • Causing acute or chronic health effects • (Neurotoxin, carcinogen, mutagen, teratogen, infectious agents.)

  41. Physical Hazards

  42. Physical Hazards • Research employee injuries, 1993 - 1997*The most common serious injuries: cuts due to careless use of razor blades.

  43. Physical Hazards • Laboratory support injuries, 1993 - 1997*The most common serious injuries: strains and fractures due to falls and improper lifting of heavy objects

  44. Physical Hazards • Administrative support injuries, 1993 - 1997*The most common serious injuries: strains and fractures due to falls and improper lifting of heavy objects.

  45. Physical Hazards HazardsRespect the dangers of high voltage, ultraviolet light, heat sources, and cryogenic materials • When transporting hazardous substances, make certain that the containers are sealed and use secondary containers. Try not to take routine manipulations for granted, especially those involving glass, needles, or sharps. • And, if you are fatigued or distracted, take a break, relax and refocus. If you notice any unsafe conditions or have an accident or injury, talk with your supervisor.

  46. Health Hazards • Hazardous substancesIt is especially important to consult the Material Safety Data Sheets when working with substances that OSHA has classified as "health hazards." These include:Carcinogens. Substances that may cause cancer in humans and animals under certain conditions. An example is chromic acid.Corrosives. Substances that cause visible destruction or permanent change to skin tissue on contact. An example is hydrochloric acid.Hepatotoxins. Substances that may cause damage to the liver. An example is chloroform.Mutagens. Substances that may cause changes in the genetic material of cells. An example is ethidium bromide.Nephrotoxins. Substances that may cause damage to the kidneys. An example is acetonitrile.Neurotoxins. Substances that are harmful to the nervous system. An example is acrylamide.Teratogens. Substances that may affect the development of an embryo or fetus. An example is formamide.

  47. Routes of Exposure • Breathing (inhalation) • Skin contact (dermal absorption) • Swallowing (ingestion) • Puncture (injection)

  48. What should you do if you spill a chemical or find a spilled chemical?

  49. Small Spill • Clean up a spill only if you: • Are familiar with the substance that was spilled • Know the substance’s toxicity • Have adequate personal protective equipment • Feel completely comfortable cleaning it up