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Structuring and Analyzing Arguments: The Rogerian Model PowerPoint Presentation
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Structuring and Analyzing Arguments: The Rogerian Model

Structuring and Analyzing Arguments: The Rogerian Model

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Structuring and Analyzing Arguments: The Rogerian Model

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  1. Structuring and Analyzing Arguments: The Rogerian Model AP English 11

  2. Rogerian Model • Developed by psychologist Carl Rogers • Emphasizes problem-solving and/or coming to a consensus • Unlike in Classical argument, this is not an argument to win; instead, emphasizes a “win-win” solution benefiting both parties • Useful in psychological and emotional arguments, where pathos and ethos dominate.

  3. Benefits of Rogerian Argument • Allows the author to appear open-minded or even objective • Appropriate in contexts where you need to convince a resistant opponent to at least respect your views

  4. Rogerian Arguments:Structure • Introduction: statement of problem to be solved or question to be answered • Summary of Opposing Views: described using a seemingly objective persona • Statement of Understanding: concedes circumstances under which opposing views might be valid • Statement of Your Position (Thesis, Assertion, Claim, etc.) • Statement of Contexts: describes contexts in which your position applies/works well • Statement of Benefits: appeals to self-interest of readers who may not yet agree with you; demonstrates how your position benefits them

  5. Introduction: statement of problem to be solved or question to be answered • Example(s) from “Is the College Use of American Indian Mascots Racist?”

  6. Summary of Opposing Views: described using a seemingly objective persona • Example(s) from “Is the College Use of American Indian Mascots Racist?”

  7. Statement of Understanding: concedes circumstances under which opposing views might be valid • Example(s) from “Is the College Use of American Indian Mascots Racist?”

  8. Statement of Your Position (Thesis, Assertion, Claim, etc.) • Example(s) from “Is the College Use of American Indian Mascots Racist?”

  9. Statement of Contexts: describes contexts in which your position applies/works well • Example(s) from “Is the College Use of American Indian Mascots Racist?”

  10. Statement of Benefits: appeals to self-interest of readers who may not yet agree with you; demonstrates how your position benefits them • Example(s) from “Is the College Use of American Indian Mascots Racist?”

  11. Practice • See if you can go through the Rogerian framework with the following issue: • Polygamy

  12. Introduction: statement of problem to be solved or question to be answered

  13. Summary of Opposing Views: described using a seemingly objective persona

  14. Statement of Understanding: concedes circumstances under which opposing views might be valid

  15. Statement of Your Position (Thesis, Assertion, Claim, etc.)

  16. Statement of Contexts: describes contexts in which your position applies/works well

  17. Statement of Benefits: appeals to self-interest of readers who may not yet agree with you; demonstrates how your position benefits them