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Introduction to Agile and Scrum

Introduction to Agile and Scrum

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Introduction to Agile and Scrum

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  1. Introduction to Agile and Scrum Speaker/Author: Paul Packebush Section Manager, Corporate Metrology Author: Logan Kunitz Staff Calibration Engineer

  2. Process Emerges to Stop Chaos • No one loves process, but it feels good compared to the pain of chaos • Developers are unable to adapt quickly • Developers are extremely good at following the existing process, and process adherence is the value system • Process starts to trump flexibility

  3. Agile Development

  4. Agile is not a process • You cannot do Agile, but you can be Agile

  5. Manifesto for Agile Software Development • Individuals and interactions • over processes and tools • Working software • over comprehensive documentation • Customer collaboration • over contract negotiation • Responding to change • over following a plan http://www.agilemanifesto.org

  6. 12 Principles behind the Agile Manifesto • Early and continuous delivery of valuable software • Welcome changing requirements • Deliver working software frequently • Teams work together daily • Trust motivated individuals to get the job done • Face-to-face conversation • Working software as primary measure of progress • Sustainable development • Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design • Simplicity • Self-organizing teams generate best end products • Teams reflect regularly and adjust behavior accordingly http://www.agilemanifesto.org

  7. What is Scrum? A framework to help teams work in an Agile way • Transparency • Everyone knows the project state • Inspection • Ongoing reflection on status • Adaptability • Team decides how to quickly adapts to changes Scrum is not a process it is a framework to get work done

  8. Scrum values • Commitment • Team has great control of its destiny • Focus • Fewer deliverables at a time • Openness • Express concerns and status often • Respect • Working together sharing in success and failures • Courage • Teams feel empowered to undertake greater challenges

  9. Scrum vs. Waterfall Waterfall: Design All Features Develop Deploy Scrum: Feature A *Design *Dev *Deploy Feature B *Design *Dev *Deploy Feature C …

  10. Scrum vs. Waterfall Waterfall: Design All Features Develop Deploy Scrum: Feature A.1 Feature B.1 … Feature A *Design *Dev *Deploy Feature B *Design *Dev *Deploy Feature C …

  11. Scrum at a Glance

  12. Scrum Implementation Case Study • NI Calibration Business Case • Long development cycles • Schedule slippage • Need for new HW product calibration support • Growing backlog of products requiring calibration support • Simply adding headcount is not a sustainable solution Approach • Transitioned from Waterfall development process to Agile / Scrum software development process • Challenges • Distributed Scrum Team • Defining “Finished”

  13. Distributed Scrum Team Challenges NI Calibration Team • Scrum dictates close, daily interaction of team members • Distributed teams are a reality for global companies • Primary challenges with distributed scrum team • Isolation of remote team members during meetings – lacking engagement in the meetings • Visual tools (i.e. white-board for tracking tasks) not accessible by remote team members • Team size (keeping daily meeting length short) Austin, TX Hungary ScrumMaster Developers Developers Product Owner

  14. Distributed Scrum Team Recommendations • Avoid meeting rooms • Everyone meets from their desk • Shared “cloud-based” tool for white board • Scrum team size: < 10 • Keep daily meetings <15 minutes

  15. Defining “Finished” • Scrum dictates a “finished” product or feature at the end of each sprint • What is “Finished” • The feature is complete and ready to be released • Why is this a problem? • 8 to 12 weeks to develop and test a typical feature (doesn’t include integration testing - another 2 to 8 weeks) • Scrum sprint length = 4 weeks • Our features usually can’t be split into sub-features that are individually shippable • It will take 2 to 3 sprints to demonstrate progress for most of our features

  16. Example: Splitting Feature into User Stories 2 to 12 weeks 8 weeks Product Development & Testing Integration / Release Testing 2 wks 2 wks 2 wks 2 wks Sub feature Development & Testing Sub feature Development & Testing Sub feature Development & Testing Final Development Testing “Finished”Ready for Integration “Finished” “Finished” “Finished” Sprint #1 Sprint #2

  17. Example: Calibration Procedure • Full procedure includes several verification steps • Split overall feature by verification step into smaller user stories • “Finished” for each story • Fully developed • Fully tested • Fully reviewed • Feature releases once all user stories are complete

  18. Conclusion NI Calibration Team Performance After Using Agile / Scrum • Improved time between product updates • Handled one-off customer feature request by doing a mid-cycle release with the new feature. Minimum impact to existing product release schedule. • Ability to meet release targets with improved accuracy