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indoor wlan channel models special committee report vinko erceg verceg@zyraywireless com et al n.
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  1. Indoor WLAN Channel ModelsSpecial Committee - ReportVinko Erceg (verceg@zyraywireless.com) et al. Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  2. Vinko Erceg (Zyray Wireless) Laurent Schumacher (Namur University) Persefoni Kyritsi (Aalborg University) Daniel Baum (ETH University) Andreas Molisch (Mitsubishi Electric) Alexei Gorokhov (Philips Research) Srinath Hosur (Texas Instruments) Srikanth Gummadi (Texas Instruments) Eilts Henry (Texas Instruments) Eric Jacobsen (Intel) Sumeet Sandhu (Intel) David Cheung (Intel) Qinghua Li (Intel) Clifford Prettie (Intel) Heejung Yu (ETRI) Yeong-Chang Maa (InProComm) Richard van Nee (Airgo) Jonas Medbo (Erricsson) Eldad Perahia (Cisco Systems) Helmut Boelcskei (ETH Univ.) Hemanth Sampath (Marvell) H. Lou (Marvell) Pieter van Rooyen (Zyray Wireless) Pieter Roux (Zyray Wireless) Majid Malek (HP) Timothy Wakeley (HP) Dongjun Lee (Samsung) Tomer Bentzion (Metalink) Nir Tal (Metalink) Amir Leshem (Metalink, Bar IIan University) Guy Shochet (Metalink) Patric Kelly (Bandspeed) Vafa Ghazi (Cadence) Mehul Mehta - Mickey (Synad Technologies) Bobby Jose (Mabuhay Networks) Charles Farlow (California Amplifier) Claude Oestges (Louvain University) Robert W. Heath (University of Texas at Austin) Mark Webster (Intersil) John Terry (Nokia) List of Participants (to be updated with new participants ) Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  3. HTSG WLAN Channel Modeling Goals • To develop a set of channel models backwards compatible with existing 802.11 channel models developed by Medbo and Schramm. • Channel models can be used to evaluate new WLAN proposals based on multiple antenna technologies. • The work has been going on since September 2002, planning for September 2003 completion. • Channel model approach was presented during the March 2003 meeting 11-03-161r0(a) Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  4. We are going to provide: • Multiple antenna models – cluster approach (compatible with single antenna models): • Path loss and shadow fading • Channel time variation (Doppler) • K-factor • Delay spread • Antenna correlation (angle of arrival, cluster definition, etc.) • Different antenna polarization (XPD) • For 2.4 and 5 GHz frequency bands • 100 MHz bandwidth (10 ns tap resolution of delay line model) • Simulation guidelines (link level and PHY rate vs. range) • Matlab code for generation of channel realizations Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  5. Maybe provided: • Interference model (coordinate with usage models group) • Adjacent-channel interference • Co-channel interference • Microwave, Bluetooth, radar, etc. • For bandwidths wider than 100 MHz Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  6. Deliverables - Actions • Delivery by September 2003 • Conference calls every two weeks (or as required) • Reports at every session • Reflector email may be set up Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  7. Brief Channel Models Summary Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  8. Channel Model-A Example • Three clusters can be clearly identified. Cluster 1 Cluster 2 dB Cluster 3 Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  9. Spatial Representation of 3 Clusters Cluster 1 Cluster 2 R1 R2 LOS Tx Antennas Rx Antennas R3 Cluster 3 Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  10. Modeling Approach • Only time domain information from SISO models can be determined (delay of each delay within each cluster and corresponding power using extrapolation methods). • In addition, for the multiple antenna clustering approach the following parameters have to be determined: • Power azimuth spectrum (PAS) shape of each cluster and tap • Cluster angle-of-arrival (AoA), mean • Cluster angular spread (AS) at the receiver • Cluster Angle-of-departure (AoD), mean • Cluster AS at the transmitter • Tap AS • Tap AoA • Tap AoD Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  11. Cluster and Tap PAS Shape • Cluster and tap PAS follow Laplacian distribution. Example of Laplacian AoA (AoD) distribution, cluster, AS = 30o Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  12. Cluster AoA and AoD • It was found in [3,4] that the relative cluster mean AoAs have a random uniform distribution over all angles. Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  13. Cluster AS • We use the following findings to determine cluster AS: • In [3] the mean cluster AS values were found to be 21o and 25o for two buildings measured. In [4] the mean AS value was found to be 37o. To be consistent with these findings, we select the mean cluster AS values for models A-E in the 20o to 40o range. • For outdoor environments, it was found that the cluster rms delay spread (DS) is highly correlated (0.7 correlation coefficient) with the AS [9]. It was also found that the cluster rms delay spread and AS can be modeled as correlated log-normal random variables. We apply this finding to our modeling approach. Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  14. Models Summary (current models in bold, old in gray) Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  15. Path Loss Two-Slope Model: LOS slope of 2 (free space) up to the inflection point and NLOS slope of 3.5 greater than the inflection point. The inflection point is the average distance from the transmitter to the first obstruction for each of the environments. Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..

  16. References [1] J. Medbo and P. Schramm, “Channel models for HIPERLAN/2,” ETSI/BRAN document no. 3ERI085B. [2] A.A.M. Saleh and R.A. Valenzuela, “A statistical model for indoor multipath propagation,” IEEE J. Select. Areas Commun., vol. 5, 1987, pp. 128-137.  [3] Q.H. Spencer, et. al., “Modeling the statistical time and angle of arrival characteristics of an indoor environment,” IEEE J. Select. Areas Commun., vol. 18, no. 3, March 2000, pp. 347-360. [4] R.J-M. Cramer, R.A. Scholtz, and M.Z. Win, “Evaluation of an ultra-wide-band propagation channel,” IEEE Trans. Antennas Propagat., vol. 50, no.5, May 2002, pp. 561-570.  [5] A.S.Y. Poon and M. Ho, “Indoor multiple-antenna channel characterization from 2 to 8 GHz,” submitted to ICC 2003 Conference. [6] G. German, Q. Spencer, L. Swindlehurst, and R. Valenzuela, “Wireless indoor channel modeling: Statistical agreement of ray tracing simulations and channel sounding measurements,” in proc. IEEE Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Proc. Conf., vol. 4, 2001, pp. 2501-2504. [7] J-G. Wang, A.S. Mohan, and T.A. Aubrey,” Angles-of-arrival of multipath signals in indoor environments,” in proc. IEEE Veh. Technol. Conf., 1996, pp. 155-159. [8] Chia-Chin Chong, David I. Laurenson and Stephen McLaughlin, “Statistical Characterization of the 5.2 GHz Wideband Directional Indoor Propagation Channels with Clustering and Correlation Properties,” in proc. IEEE Veh. Technol. Conf., vol. 1, Sept. 2002, pp. 629-633. [9] K.I. Pedersen, P.E. Mogensen, and B.H. Fleury, “A stochastic model of the temporal and azimuthal dispersion seen at the base station in outdoor propagation environments,” IEEE Trans. Veh. Technol., vol. 49, no. 2, March 2000, pp. 437-447. [10] L. Schumacher, Namur University, Belgium, (laurent.schumacher@ieee.org). Vinko Ereg, Zyray Wireless; et al..