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Discovering Nottingham

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Discovering Nottingham

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  1. Discovering Nottingham Rebranding, Regeneration and Renewal P.S.Fox. MMX The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  2. Introduction • These photographs were taken as part of the Rebranding Nottingham Fieldwork visit on Thursday 8th April 2010 to illustrate the changes that have been constant in the development of Nottingham in its growth as a city. • Some photographs and materials have been added to provide an additional information and background. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  3. Location and site The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  4. South Prospect of Nottingham about 1750 looking towards Castle and St Mary’s Hill across the Meadows and the River Leen. This prospect illustrates the site of the city, north of the River Trent on two small hills; Castle Hill and St. Mary’s Hill. Source: Nottingham City Library The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  5. John Speed’s map of part of Nottingham 1610 This map shows Nottingham as ‘the garden city’. The central square is marked as G . Notice the orchards and the parks. The River Leen is shown in the southern part of the map. Source: Nottingham County Library The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  6. Nottingham from the south 1750 Nottingham 1750 looking from the South towards St Mary’s Church. The age when Nottingham was seen as a ‘garden city’ Source: Nottingham City Library The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  7. Map Pre 1790 Gardens and open spaces Castle now Duke of Newcastle's Mansion Lace Market – Plumtre House Gardens No Canals or Railways – pre 1839 The enclosure of Nottingham was later than many other cities [1845] which had two main consequences – overcrowding and the development of industry in surrounding settlements. Source: Nottingham City Library The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  8. Salmon’s Map 1861 This map shows some of the industrialisation and overcrowding that took place in Victorian Nottingham. The largest church shown – to the right [East] is St Mary’s – in the Lace Market. The Market Square is in the top left [North West] of the map. Source: Nottingham County Library The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  9. Nottingham Gateway The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  10. Nottingham Railway Station Opened in 1904 as a replacement for two previous stations by the Midland Railway. The railway was opened to Nottingham on 30th May 1839, the line to Lincoln 4th August 1846. The area between the Railway Station and the city centre called ‘The Gateway’ is due to be redeveloped – the Broad Marsh Shopping centre is to be expanded. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  11. The Tram Viaduct looking towards the Lace Market The Nottingham Tram system used some of the route of the old railway route to the old Victoria Station – an example of reuse. The tram is to be extended to the west and south. ‘Transport 2000’ resulted in the limitation of traffic in the centre of the city. Nottingham is soon to introduce car parking charges for workers within the city too. The Chapel in the background is High Pavement Chapel built on the site of a previous chapel started in 1691. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  12. Nottingham Canal – looking east The Nottingham Canal, opened in 1792 to allow coal owners to trans-ship coal to Nottingham form the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire Coalfields was lined with factories and wharves. Now on the right is Capital One part of which occupies the old Boots print works which was opened in 1952 on a bombed out site. On the left is new offices and businesses not yet opened. [2010] Location : Bridge over Nottingham Canal adjacent Capital One HQ The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  13. Capital One Headquarters Building Reflecting the development on the North side of the canal. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  14. High and Middle Pavement New buildings and refurbishment The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  15. Nottingham Contemporary This art gallery, on High Pavement was opened in 2009 to provide an additional attraction to this area and to the city for tourists. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  16. Nottingham Contemporary Art Gallery The Gallery features and outside piazza and a café. This area had been derelict for many years before this was constructed on this site. An example of the reuse of a derelict site. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  17. Drury Hill – 1960 one of the many slum areas of Nottingham in Victorian times – Drury Hill was demolished to make way for the Broad Marsh Shopping Centre – 1965. Source: Nottingham City Library The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  18. Weekday Cross This was the trading centre of the old Saxon settlement on the main route into Nottingham from the Trent Bridge and the south. Now this is the entrance to the Lace Market area for tourists. The area was restored by the Nottingham Civic Society in 1993. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  19. Middle Pavement These high class Georgian Houses, owned in their time by the rich gentry have been repurposed into up-market high class ‘niche’ shops and services. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  20. Middle Pavement Paul Smith’s Shop – Willoughby House 1738 -1743 This high quality Georgian House was built for Rothwell Willoughby one of Nottingham’s first bankers. In 2004 it was refurbished for Paul Smith – a local fashion designer and now acts as a shop. An example preservation and reuse. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  21. Pitcher and Piano This Chapel has had many uses over the past decade – from Chapel to lace museum. It is now a bar. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  22. Shire Hall, High Pavement This building , constructed in 1770-1772 and refurbished many times acted as the Crown court, Jail and place of execution. In recent years it has become the ‘Galleries of Justice’ one of the only judicial museums in the country – with court rooms and cells on view. It is thought that an original Saxon Hall occupied this site in 1375. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  23. St Mary’s Church, Lace Market This is one of the oldest churches in Nottingham at the centre of the Saxon community and reputedly now one of the largest Parish churches in the country. Probably started as a Saxon minster in the 12 or 13th century but restored and enlarged in 1846-50. Built with money from the town guilds. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  24. St Mary’s Church The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  25. St Mary’s Church The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  26. Original doorway in the church wall on High Pavement The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  27. National Ice Stadium Built on the site of a 1930s ice stadium on the kudos of the performance of Torvill and Dean. Half funded by the National Lottery Fund. Opened in 2000 at a cost of £40 million it seats 7000. It has no car parking facilities because the City Council were keen that it should be accessed by Public Transport! The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  28. The Lace Market Redevelopment of a Victorian Area – improving what there is The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  29. The Lace Market – Broadway Built in the mid nineteenth century to be the centre for lace marketing [not manufacture] The area became very run down in the 1960s and was made into a Conservation area and later transformed into apartments, clubs, bars and small businesses. This was funded by the Historic Buildings Council and a development company. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  30. Broadway – Lace Market The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  31. Stoney Street As part of the refurbishment of this area a multi-story car park was constructed which is illustrated here but designed to be ‘in keeping’ with the other buildings in the area. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  32. The Adams Building – Lace Market Built 1854-1855 and redeveloped between 1996- 1998 with funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund and The European Development Fund and English Partnerships – cost £16.5 million. The building designed by the Nottingham architect T.C. Hine is now part of New College Nottingham. An example of refurbishment and reuse. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  33. The Adams Building The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  34. Hockley Hockley is a small niche shopping and entertainment area mainly developed in recent years on the popularity of Nottingham as a student city. This shop was one of the first used by the Boots Company – when it was built it was one of the most advanced in terms of design in the country. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  35. The Victoria Shopping Centre City shopping attraction and rehousing The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  36. Victoria Centre The Victoria Centre was one of the first large indoor shopping centres built in Britain – 1965 – 1972. It was build on the site of the Victoria Railway Station complex – the clock tower remains. A high rise block of council flats towers over the centre – to provide accommodation for some of the people displaced by the redevelopment of the slum areas of Nottingham The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  37. The Entertainment and Education Quarter Theatre, Concert Hall, Cinema Complex, Nottingham Trent University The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  38. Nottingham Theatre Quarter Multiplex Cinema Village 2001 built on the site of the Nottingham Evening Post – printing plant. Now a 16 screen cinema complex with clubs and bars. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  39. Cinema and entertainment complex The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  40. Theatre Royal and Concert Hall Complex The Theatre Royal was built when the city was enclosed after 1845 north of Backside. The theatre was opened in 1865 and was bought and restored by the city council in 1969. This was one of Britain's first theatre restoration projects and has been followed by many others. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  41. Theatre Royal Nottingham 1860 – 1865. The redevelopment of the Theatre Royal in the 1970s formed the basis for the development of a entertainment complex in this area of the city. The Theatre Royal is an example of building which was remodelled and extended to meet modern requirements without compromising the original interiors. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  42. Theatre Royal The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  43. Tram route – Market Street This street, Market Street, was cut through some of the worst slum housing areas in Nottingham in 1865 when the theatre was built at its Northern end. Market Street links the Market Square to parliament Street. It is now traffic free – with exception of trams and buses. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  44. Old Victorian Area The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  45. Hurt’s Yard – Burgess Plots This is one of the few alleyways still left which shows the pattern of building in Victorian Nottingham – this alley runs from Parliament Street [called Back Side] to the Market Square. This area, once one of the most overcrowded in Nottingham has undergone considerable re-development with the exception of this example. Many of the shops here are closed and boarded up but ripe for development in a Dickensian theme. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  46. Hurt’s Yard The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  47. Long Row and Market Square Improve and reuse The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  48. Long Row Long Row was one of Nottingham's most important streets. Originally colonnaded this is where almost every conceivable type of service could be found twenty four hours a day. Most of the shops extend into caves below. Competition from the two large shopping centres – Broad Marsh and the Victoria Centre has resulted in this area becoming to some extent eclipsed although the Market Square still proves to the be the main focus of the city. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  49. King and Queen Street King and Queen Street extend from the Market Square to Parliament Street in 1891-1892. The statue of Brian Clough is a recent addition to this area celebrating his links with the city. The building in the background is the Prudential Assurance building – 1893-1898, restored 1991 The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX

  50. Queen’s Chambers – Long Row This important building was designed by the local architect – Watson Fothergill who designed and built many Nottingham buildings – especially in ‘The Park’. This Tudorbethan Gothic building was opened in 1897. It has had a variety of uses. The Geographical Association P. S. Fox. MMX