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Common Core: Leading the Change in Special Education

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Common Core: Leading the Change in Special Education

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  1. Common Core: Leading the Change in Special Education Connecting the work across the state....

  2. Objectives: • Understand the shifts needed to support Common Core Implementation • Discover resources available to support this work • Walk away with tools and processes needed to lead this change

  3. For our time together... • Take responsibility for your own learning • Support the learning of your colleagues • If you need to take a call or have a side conversation, please step out • If you have a question, ask

  4. Connector • Grab a couple sticky-notes • Individual Reflection – one idea on each sticky-note “What are your fears and hopes about the Common Core?”

  5. Connector • Collegial Conversations – • Find Themes, patterns, shared ideas • Share to Whole

  6. CCSS States and the Assessment Consortia Balance Assessment Consortiumd Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) 9.50

  7. Common Core States and Assessments

  8. Key Players in CCSS Creation • National Governor’s Association (NGA): policy organization representing all U.S. states, territories and commonwealths • Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO): leads collective state action in areas of Educator Workforce; Information Systems and Research; Next Generation Learners; and Standards, Assessment, and Accountability. • Achieve: a bi-partisan non-profit created by governors & business leaders in support of standards-based education reform

  9. Timeline of the Common Core

  10. Timeline of the Common Core

  11. Timeline of the Common Core

  12. Used with permission Office of Standards and Assessment MDE

  13. Upcoming Opportunities

  14. Conceptual Model Accessibility tools available to all Students as per principles of universal design (e.g., writing tools, zoom, mark for review, breaks, customized English glossaries). Accessibility tools available to students but must be arranged or activated prior to assessment through an Individual Student Assessment Accessibility Profile (e.g., color contract, color overlay). Smarter Balanced’s digital delivery system includes n array of embedded accessibility features designed to preserve intended constructs Local schools & teachers provide accommodations, supports, assistive technologies & physical arrangements designed to preserve intended constructs. Accommodations documented (e.g., braille, ASL, translation option). A very small percentage of students participate in alternate assessments aligned to the Common Core State Standards

  15. Embedded Universal Tools • Available to all students unless an educator feels they are distracting, in which case they can be turned off. Examples: • Digital notepad, English glossary, expandable pages, highlighter, mark for review, spell check, strikethrough, and zoom.

  16. Non-embedded Universal Tools • Provided locally and outside of the computer test administration system. Examples: • Breaks, English dictionary, scratch paper, thesaurus

  17. Designated Supports • Available for use by ANY STUDENT for whom the need has been indicated by an educator (or team of educators with the parent). • Student input is also recommended. • Included for federal accountability purposes. • Need to be identified prior to assessment administration and entered into the Test Information Distribution Engine (TIDE). • Use of the Individual Student Assessment Accessibility Profile (ISAAP) is a process that may be used for decision making.

  18. Embedded Designated Supports • Color contrast- attention difficulties, visual impairments, print disabilities • Text-to-speech- struggling readers, reading related disabilities, or students that are blind • Translated test directions- students with limited English language skills • Turn off any universal tools

  19. Non-embedded Designated Supports • Color overlays- students with attention difficulties, students with visual impairments or other print disabilities • Magnification- Students used to viewing enlarged text or graphics • Read aloud- Readers should be provided to students on an individual basis- not to a group of students • Scribe • Separate Setting

  20. Smarter Balanced Accommodations • Changes in procedures or materials that increase equitable access during the Smarter Balanced Assessment. • Documented need on an IEP or 504 plan • Physical injury is an exception • Entered ahead of time • Parents should be notified

  21. Embedded Accommodations • ASL- A human signer and the signed test content are viewed on the same screen • Braille • Closed captionoing • Text-to-speech for ELA reading passages • This accommodation is appropriate for a very small number of students 1-2% • Only available in grades 6-8 and 11

  22. Non-embedded Accommodations • Abacus • Alternate response options • Adapted keyboards, stickykeys, adaptive mouse • Calculator • When a special calculator is needed such as a braille or talking calculator • Read Aloud (ELA passages 6-8 and 11) • Scribe (for ELA writing) • Print on demand

  23. Conceptual Model Accessibility tools available to all Students as per principles of universal design (e.g., writing tools, zoom, mark for review, breaks, customized English glossaries). Accessibility tools available to students but must be arranged or activated prior to assessment through an Individual Student Assessment Accessibility Profile (e.g., color contract, color overlay). Smarter Balanced’s digital delivery system includes n array of embedded accessibility features designed to preserve intended constructs Local schools & teachers provide accommodations, supports, assistive technologies & physical arrangements designed to preserve intended constructs. Accommodations documented (e.g., braille, ASL, translation option). A very small percentage of students participate in alternate assessments aligned to the Common Core State Standards

  24. Accommodations & Modifications… • Essential Questions: • What environmental demands or teacher-initiated expectations will create barriers for the student to learn and/or demonstrate what she knows and is able to do? • What instructional and/or environmental factors within the control of the classroom teacher can be altered to eliminate or minimize barriers to participation? • Is this accommodation appropriate for instruction, assessment, or both? • Is this accommodation intended to be temporary or long term? • Is this accommodation feasible and appropriate for setting?

  25. Complexity

  26. Complexity • Create – a definition • Create – a summary • Create – a hypothesis • Create – an analysis

  27. When thinking of the tasks & lessons designed for your students, what level of DOK is most used?

  28. When thinking of the tasks & lessons designed for your students, what level of DOK is most used? Polleverywhere.com

  29. Accommodations & Modifications… • Essential Questions: • What environmental demands or teacher-initiated expectations will create barriers for the student to learn and/or demonstrate what she knows and is able to do? • What instructional and/or environmental factors within the control of the classroom teacher can be altered to eliminate or minimize barriers to participation? • Is this accommodation appropriate for instruction, assessment, or both? • Is this accommodation intended to be temporary or long term? • Is this accommodation feasible and appropriate for setting? • LRP Conference 10/30/12 by Carol Kosnitksy

  30. Present Level • Essential Questions: • What skills, knowledge, and behaviors does the student currently demonstrate? • How does this compare with the expectations for the student’s enrolled grade level? • What are the missing skills (gap) between the student’s current skills and knowledge and the grade expectations? • How does the student’s disability affect involvement and progress in the general curriculum? Added after the MAASE presentation by request. LRP Conference 10/30/12 by Carol Kosnitksy

  31. Present Level • Essential Questions continued: • Is this skill or behavior necessary to move towards the vision? • Will the student’s needs be addressed through specially designed instruction and/or accommodations? • Has the student been taught content aligned with standards, and how ahs the student responded? • What have we learned from previous IEP data? Added after the MAASE presentation by request. LRP Conference 10/30/12 by Carol Kosnitksy

  32. Goals • Essential Questions: • What skills, knowledge and behaviors must this student acquire to access the general education curriculum? • What growth and progress can be reasonably expected of this student in the coming year? • Will the expected growth and rate of progress narrow the achievement gap for this student? Added after the MAASE presentation by request. LRP Conference 10/30/12 by Carol Kosnitksy

  33. Break! timer 1.30

  34. What can IEP teams do to now to support student success on the Common Core? Todaysmeet.com/MAASE Sign in as name & district Artifact for the day

  35. SBAC Practice Test Beginning with the end in mind

  36. Performance Tasks