Download
ch 12 coloring outside the lines n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
CH 12 COLORING OUTSIDE THE LINES PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
CH 12 COLORING OUTSIDE THE LINES

CH 12 COLORING OUTSIDE THE LINES

75 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

CH 12 COLORING OUTSIDE THE LINES

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. CH 12 COLORING OUTSIDE THE LINES

  2. I. INNOVATION MEANS TAKING RISKS • A. Add Color • Silicon Graphics wanted computer that looked high-end • IDEO added color: purple, green, red, blue • 10 years before iMac’s colorful monitors in 1998 • B. Sticking with Status Quo loses in Long Run • Seems safer • But after awhile can’t compete with other firms • C. Web is full of Examples • Hotmail: gambled that freee-mail could sell • Amazon: selling books • iWon.com: give away moneyin short run • Web customers: risked using credit cards online

  3. II. FAIL YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS • A. Fail Often to Succeed Sooner • Embrace a culture of mini-failures • Heart of prototyping • Charles Schwab – many failures – “noble failures’ • Pocketerm: handheld stock-quote device • Schwabline: paper copies of people’s portfolios • Schwab Quotes: real-time quotes available for customers • Created accessory for Apple, then Apple made it free • Failed: too expensive, glitches, cumbersome • Failures kept Schwab on cutting edge • Failures teach • B. Never Ignore Worst Case Scenario • IDEO created accessory for Apple computer • Then Apple developed one and shipped it free

  4. C. Don’t Fall in Love with Your Product • IDEO used famous Italian designer for new phone • The design won awards, appeared in movies • Was on cover of European design mags • Entered permanent collection of Museum of Modern Art • But made production errors • Used unproven manufacturer in Hong Kong • Used exclusive distribution agreement • phone cost $150 – big financial failure • D. Learn to Juggle • Practice with beanbags – small price for failure • Balls roll under couch • Rocks hurt your feet when fall • Practice prototyping lots of small projects

  5. III. GROWN MEN AFRAID OF A LITTLE MOUSE • A. IDEO tried to introduce infra-redmouse in 1980s • Corporation liked it at first • Then rejected it out of fear • “I’ll be know for the rest of my career with the company as the guy with that stupid cordless mouse.” • B. Infra-red Mouse became Industry Standard Later • IV. MAKING NEW RIDES • A. Fear Doesn’t get You Down the Mountain • Thinking about what you might lose • Makes it impossible to take a leap

  6. B. Snowboarding • Called a fad • Time magazine: America’s “Worst New Sport” • Ski resorts banned it • C. It was Time to Break the Rules • Skiing was slowing down, ticket prices rising, dated • Jake Burton Carpenter – evangelist for snowboarding • Researched and built boards in his garage • Went to Austria • Popularized sport • Answered 1-800 calls 24/7 • Campaigned to get ski resorts to acceptsnowboarding • Now leading manufacturer of snowboards • Millions enjoy snowboarding

  7. D. Schwinn Blew Opportunity • Wrote mountain biking off as fad • Early mountain bikers had modified Schwinns • Others developed the fat-wheeled, comfortable bikes • Now very popular: 70% sold in US are mountain bikes • “Innovate or Die” • V. SPIRITED SKIES • A. Southwest Launched • Business plan on cocktail napkin • Use humor in operations and with customers • Personal touches with employees: birthday cards • Only rule is no rules • SW is tops in safety, price, on-time, baggage handling • Teamwork is high

  8. VI. BEING BIG AND ACTING SMALL • A. Be Opportunistic, Flexible • Large corporation can create small firm • Can be formal or informal • Small department or division or new firm • Agile, risk-taking, adopts new ideas • B. Use Assets of Corporation toTake Risks • Gilette: spent $200 M creating 2-blade Sensor • Immediately began work on 3-blade razor • Spent $750 M on it, now has 70% of market • VII. BREAKING WORK RULES • A. Rules Leads to Bureaucracy • B. Bette Nesmith: bad typist created Liquid Paper

  9. VIII. LINUX BREAKING THE RULES • A. Linus Torvalds Created Free Operating System • Young student in early 1990s • Couldn’t afford operating system so he created his own • Broke many rules • Made it ‘open source’ software • Freely available so many could use it and contribute to it • Today 15 million users • IX. GIVE AND RECEIVE • A. Websites offer Something Free • Search engines, greeting cards, e-mail, reviews, articles • Still make money • B. One Thing Leads to Another • Onsale website, like Sotheby’s failed, but led to eBay

  10. X. COLORING OUTSIDE THE LINES • A. Subtle Mind-set • Doing things like you are supposed to does not lead to something new • Doing something different can • IDEO brought in toy division to developad for mattresses • Developed talking pillow • Big success • B. Strip Process/product to Basics • Vary mix • Don’t fall in love with a tool • Innovation team may use videos, art board, prototype • Laptop, hand drawing, going off-site

  11. XI. 7 Rule Breaking Companies • A. Igloo • Developed room for 6-pack in small, dorm room fridge • Space Mate • B. Shoebox Greetings • Need to produce 20 new ideas a day • No rules about office dress, décor • Wander the halls, brainstorm wherever • Get movie passes in afternoon • Writers can take creative lessons – art, ceramics • C. Sephora • Reinvented how high-end cosmetics are sold • Perfumes are along the wall, with customers • Many samples

  12. D. Target • Has become a design leader: Michael Graves and others • Broke out of the idea of a discount store • E. Swatch • Halved # of working parts in watch • Interchangeable faces • Led design and fashion craze • F. E-Schwab • Launched online brokerage with low commission rates • Regular brokers complained • Schwab lowered all commission rates • G. Rubbermaid • Goal: introduce 300 new items every year • 1/3 are entirely new, from the ground up

  13. XII. NOT TOO FAR OUT • A. Gordon McKenzie “Orbiting the Giant Hairball” • Messy hairball: firm’s rules, regulations, policies • Mind-numbing • Can get tangled up in it and never make anything new • If spin out from it, go into space, can’t help anybody • But if orbit the hairball • Can influence the organization • Without being snagged into the morass