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Math CAMPPP 2012

Math CAMPPP 2012

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Math CAMPPP 2012

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  1. Math CAMPPP 2012 Supporting Students with Learning Disabilities in Mathematics Connie Quadrini, YCDSB Geraldine Murphy, YCDSB Ruth Beatty, Lakehead University 1

  2. Myth or Truth? • Students with learning disabilities have average intelligence. http://www.adnetonline.org/.cWtools/download.php/mnF=LD%20Myths%20Facts.pdf,mnOD=LD%20Resources,mnOD=Learning%20Disabilities,mnOD=Topics,mnOD=Information,mnOD=HTML,mnOD=My%20Documents,dc=adnet,dc=mennonite,dc=net

  3. Myth or Truth? • Students with learning disabilities are lazy. http://www.adnetonline.org/.cWtools/download.php/mnF=LD%20Myths%20Facts.pdf,mnOD=LD%20Resources,mnOD=Learning%20Disabilities,mnOD=Topics,mnOD=Information,mnOD=HTML,mnOD=My%20Documents,dc=adnet,dc=mennonite,dc=net

  4. Myth or Truth? • With effort, most students can out-grow their learning disabilities. http://www.adnetonline.org/.cWtools/download.php/mnF=LD%20Myths%20Facts.pdf,mnOD=LD%20Resources,mnOD=Learning%20Disabilities,mnOD=Topics,mnOD=Information,mnOD=HTML,mnOD=My%20Documents,dc=adnet,dc=mennonite,dc=net

  5. Myth or Truth? • Accommodations listed in individual education plans give students with learning disabilities an unfair advantage [in mathematics]. http://www.adnetonline.org/.cWtools/download.php/mnF=LD%20Myths%20Facts.pdf,mnOD=LD%20Resources,mnOD=Learning%20Disabilities,mnOD=Topics,mnOD=Information,mnOD=HTML,mnOD=My%20Documents,dc=adnet,dc=mennonite,dc=net

  6. Education for All Our Mission Our commitment is to every student. This means …. [ensuring] that we develop strategies to help every student learn, no matter their personal circumstances. (Reach Every Student: Energizing Ontario Education, 2008)

  7. Human Rights Code The Human Rights Code provides for the right to equal treatmentwith respect to services, without discrimination on the basis of a number of grounds, including disability. Education is considered to be a service under the code, and service providers have an obligation to accommodate a person’sneeds…persons with disabilities should be considered, assessed, and accommodated on an individual basis.

  8. Goals for Today • increase empathy for students with learning disabilities by developing an understanding of the cognitive processes + executive functioning • explore the impact of these processes on the teaching and learning of mathematics • select instructional and assessment strategies to increase success for students with learning disabilities

  9. Understanding the Profile of Exceptional Learners 9 The Cognitive Processes + Executive Functioning

  10. Information In Information Out The Cognitive Processes and Learning • Information: • Storage • Processing • Retrieval

  11. Cognitive Ability is Measured in 4 Domains Verbal Comprehension Perceptual Reasoning Memory Processing Speed + Executive Functioning Cognitive Processes

  12. Normal Distribution Curve

  13. S2 AVERAGE S1

  14. LD AVERAGE LD

  15. Profile: Student with a Learning Disability • Over-all average to above average intelligence, i.e. the potential to learn • May have difficulty with input or output • May have difficulty with information processing, storage or retrieval • Academic Achievement may not be reflective of ability

  16. AVERAGE MID 5 1 0

  17. Profile: Student with a Mild Intellectual Disability • Overall Cognitive ability from 1st to 5th % ile • Delays in all areas of cognitive development • Delays in adaptive skills • Difficulty understanding abstract concepts • Potential for academic learning, independent social adjustment and economic self-support

  18. AVERAGE ‘SL’ 5 1 0

  19. Profile: Student with Below Average Cognitive Ability (‘Slower Learner’) • People who learn at a slower rate are cognitively functioning between the 6th and 24th percentiles • People who function within the range of slower learners have average to low-average adaptive skills

  20. Simulations 20 Understanding the Cognitive Processes + Executive Functioning through a Mathematical Lens

  21. VERBAL COMPREHENSION

  22. Imagine the student reading this… Usually, we tend to associate increasing rates with graphs that become “steeper”. This is correct when the function is increasing itself and the slopes are positive. However, when the function is decreasing and the slopes are negative, the increase of the steepness of the graph means that the magnitude of the slope increases, thus, the number becomes “more negative” and the actual value of the slope is decreasing. TIPS4RM, Calculus and Vectors: MCV4U - Unit 4: Rate of Change Problems, Page 13

  23. How do you feel… Make a shape using 3 DAGOblocks. Point to one of your blocks. What fraction of the shape is this block? Nelson Mathematics 2, Chapter 12, Chapter Interview, Interview Questions / Prompts Make a shape using 3 identical blocks. Point to one of your blocks. What fraction of the shape is this block? Nelson Mathematics 2, Chapter 12, Chapter Interview, Interview Questions / Prompts I compared the distance to the time using a rate. I wrote a proportion with a missing term for the distance travelled in 1 hr. The scale factor is 3 because 3 ÷ 3 = 1. So, I divided 240 by 3 to get the missing term. Nelson Mathematics 7, p. 47 I compared the distance to the time using a BLOB. I wrote a BLAH with a missing BLAK for the distance travelled in 1 hr. The BLIK is 3 because 3 ÷ 3 = 1. So, I divided 240 by 3 to get the missing BLEB. Nelson Mathematics 7, p. 47

  24. Verbal Comprehension Verbal comprehension involves: • the ability to take in and comprehend verbal material presented orally and in writing • formulating ideas in thinking and expressing them orally and in writing YCDSB Supporting Students with Learning Disabilities in Mathematics (2012)

  25. PERCEPTUAL REASONING

  26. What We See… Math CLIPS, Exploring Part / Whole Relationships, CLIP 5: Representing Improper Fractions as Mixed Numbers , 5.2 Leftovers, Scene 5

  27. What a Student Might See… Dre6 tha mhc1a5 iutc tha qiaoe5

  28. b d p q h n u m w c o e a 6 9 3 8 2 5 1 l 6 b 2 Z 5 S

  29. Thraa 5tnbaut5 aeoh raoaivab e wabinw-5i2ab qi22e. Lnka eta Zl3 cf hi5 qi22e. Ji11 eta VZ cf har qi22e. 5e6e eta ZlS cf har qi22e. Mhc eta wcra qi22e? A student with weakness in Perceptual Reasoning might experience this . . . . And we think we have asked them to read this . . . . . Three students each received a medium-sized pizza. Luke ate 5/8 of his pizza. Jill ate 1/2 of her pizza. Saba ate 2/5 of her pizza. Who ate more pizza?

  30. From Part to Whole If this figure represents , draw the whole.

  31. Visualizing the Whole

  32. Perceptual Reasoning Perceptual reasoning involves: • the ability understand visual-spatial information, such as part-whole relations, patterns and sequences • the ability to generate visual representations in the mind, problem-solve and present ideas in a visual format YCDSB Supporting Students with Learning Disabilities in Mathematics (2012)

  33. MEMORY

  34. What’s My Fraction?

  35. Introducing Cuisenaire Rods

  36. Represent the following fractions. • If the orange rod has a value of 1 whole, what fraction would you use to describe the… • white rod • purple rod • brown rod

  37. Types of Memory • Verbal • Visual • Short Term • Long Term • Working

  38. Memory Memory: • involves working memory, short-term and long-term memory • working memory is the ability to hold information in the mind for processing / manipulating YCDSB Supporting Students with Learning Disabilities in Mathematics (2012)

  39. PROCESSING SPEED / VISUAL MOTOR INTEGRATION

  40. How many plums? Young Mathematicians at Work: Constructing Multiplication and Division, Fosnot & Dolk (2001)

  41. Different Representations What is the same / different about these representations? Images drawn from Math CLIPS, Exploring Part / Whole Relationships, CLIP 2: Forming and Naming Equivalent Fractions, Activity 2.1: Recognizing Equivalent Fractions, Scene 2

  42. Processing Speed / Visual-Motor Integration Processing Speed and Visual Motor Integration involves: • Processing speed is the ability to perform simple visual tasks quickly and accurately. It may apply to processing of other types of information • Visual motor integration is the ability to coordinate visual input and physical movement to movements to produce written work accurately YCDSB Supporting Students with Learning Disabilities in Mathematics (2012)

  43. EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONING

  44. Representing Fractions • Use the adding machine tape provided to create a number line. Label the following fractions on your number line:

  45. Executive Functioning Executive Functioning involves • mental processes that draw on past experiences in order to successfully complete a task • planning, organizing, strategizing, focusing attention, self-monitoring, self-regulating, and managing time and space YCDSB Supporting Students with Learning Disabilities in Mathematics (2012)

  46. Middle Years Collaborative Inquiry Research Project 47 YCDSB in Partnership with Lakehead University and Trent University

  47. Research Questions How does understanding of content knowledge [for teaching] mathematics, and how students with learning disabilities learn this content, support teachers of mathematics in planning for instruction and assessment? What is the effect of these understandings on practice and related student achievement in mathematics?

  48. Process and Timelines

  49. Supporting Students with Learning Disabilities in Mathematics A YCDSB Resource I E P Individual Education Plan Inclusion Engagement Performance

  50. Supporting Students with Learning Disabilities in Mathematics Front Matter of Document • Our Context • What We Know • What We Believe • The Intended Use of the Resource Breakthrough by Fullan, Hill, Crevola (2006)