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Bible 10

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Bible 10

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  1. Bible 10 March 10: Parables

  2. Outline Help Schedule Sign-up • Tuesday and Wednesday at lunch or after school.

  3. Discussing the intangible… Love? • What is love? • Why are there so many songs, stories, and poems about love? • Can love be fully understood or communicated without song/story/poetry? • What is a metaphor? • What is a simile? • Why are metaphors and similes so important in understanding the Divine?

  4. Two Reasons for Parables: • To discuss the Divine or the intangible. • To disarm know-it-alls • Think about Messianic Expectation and what most Jews thought. • What would people think if Jesus said, “I am the Messiah, the Kingdom of God is here.” • “The Kingdom of God is like a mustard seed” would throw them all off. The Kingdom is like that…

  5. Matthew 13:31-32 31 He told them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed, which a man took and planted in his field. 32 Though it is the smallest of all seeds, yet when it grows, it is the largest of garden plants and becomes a tree, so that the birds come and perch in its branches.” • What historical/agricultural background ought we know? • What does the parable mean? • What does that mean about the Kingdom of God?

  6. Homework: • Work on outlines • Read Mark 4:1-20 • What historical/agricultural background ought we know? • What does the parable mean? • What does that mean about the Kingdom of God? • Study Luke 15 for Block Day Scripture Quiz

  7. Bible 10 Parables of the Kingdom March 11, 2014

  8. Take out homework • In Small Groups (3-4 people), re-read Mark 4:1-20 and discuss answers from last night’s homework.

  9. Agricultural background • The path • The rocky soil • The weeds • The good soil

  10. Who are the characters in the story?

  11. Mark 4:9-13 Hear = Heed = Listen = Pay Attention 9 Then Jesus said, “Whoever has ears to hear, let them hear.” 10 When he was alone, the Twelve and the others around him asked him about the parables. 11 He told them, “The secret of the kingdom of God has been given to you. But to those on the outside everything is said in parables 12 so that, “‘they may be ever seeing but never perceiving,    and ever hearing but never understanding;otherwise they might turn and be forgiven!’[a]” 13 Then Jesus said to them, “Don’t you understand this parable? How then will you understand any parable?  Isaiah 6: Isaiah’s commission

  12. Matthew 13:44-46 44 “The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field. When a man found it, he hid it again, and then in his joy went and sold all he had and bought that field. 45 “Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant looking for fine pearls. 46 When he found one of great value, he went away and sold everything he had and bought it. In your table groups: What does this tell us about the Kingdom of God? What does this parable mean?

  13. Homework: • Finish Exegesis Outlines by Friday • Study Luke 15 for Scripture Quiz • Don’t forget Lunch Appointments • Today: Lunch 12:55-1:05 – Matthew 8:18-27 • Today: Lunch 1:05-1:15 – Luke 18:18-30 • Today: After School 3:05-3:30 – Mark 8:27-38 • Wednesday: Lunch 12:55-1:05 – Matthew 4:1-11 • Wednesday: Lunch 1:05-1:15 - ______ • Wednesday: Lunch 1:15-1:25 - ______ • Wednesday: After School 3:05-3:30 - ______

  14. Bible 10 Parables of the Kingdom March 12-13, 2014

  15. Scripture Quiz: Luke 15 • In Jesus’ first illustration, how many sheep do you have in your possession before one is lost? • In Jesus’ second illustration, how many silver coins do you have in your possession before one is lost? • In both the Parable of the Lost Sheep and the Lost Coin, why is there rejoicing in heaven? • What did the younger son request from his father? • What did he do with what he received from his father? • What type of animal did the lost son feed for work? • When the lost son reflected on home, who in his Father’s house has food to spare? • What did the father do when he first saw his son? • What did the older brother hear when he approached the house from the field? • What was the older brother’s emotional response to the festivities?

  16. The Parable of the Two Sons 28 “What do you think? There was a man who had two sons. He went to the first and said, ‘Son, go and work today in the vineyard.’ 29 “‘I will not,’ he answered, but later he changed his mind and went. 30 “Then the father went to the other son and said the same thing. He answered, ‘I will, sir,’ but he did not go. 31 “Which of the two did what his father wanted?” “The first,” they answered. Jesus said to them, “Truly I tell you, the tax collectors and the prostitutes are entering the kingdom of God ahead of you. 32 For John came to you to show you the way of righteousness, and you did not believe him, but the tax collectors and the prostitutes did. And even after you saw this, you did not repent and believe him. What does this tell us about the Kingdom of God? What does the parable mean?

  17. Parable of the Wheat and Tares: Mt 13:24-30 • What is a tare? • What does this teach us about the Kingdom? • Who will sort out the wheat and the tares? • This is a crossover Kingdom/Grace/ Judgment Parable

  18. Retell the Parable • Good and Bad Fish: Mat 13:47-50 • Parable of the yeast and growing Seed: Mat 13:33, Mark 4:26-29 • Parable of the workers: Mat 20:1-16 • [Parable of the Sower]: Mark 4:1-20 • Research the background and potential meaning of the text. • Rewrite your parable into modern language/parallels and creatively retell it to the class (skit, poem, mime, etc.)

  19. Bible 10 How To Write An Exegetical Paper & Questions March 14, 2014 Pass in your outlines

  20. Exegesis: Textual Background • Skim the entire book (Matthew, Mark, Luke, John) • Read the headings, skim Jesus’ words, read occasional topic sentences • This will help you get a general feel for the book • Look up a structural outline of your Gospel • For example: http://www.biblestudytools.com/mark/ • Figure out where your text fits into the structure • Carefully read immediate context • AT LEAST 2 chapters before and after your text • Read chapters in the same section of your text • Write notes of what happens in each section

  21. Exegesis: Cultural/Historical Background • Read your passage carefully and highlight, underline, or write down words, phrases, sayings, quotes, or anything that you think might be significant or difficult to understand. • Look those terms or phrases up in a Bible Dictionary • For example: http://www.biblestudytools.com/dictionary/ • Look up your passage in my Green Book • IVP Bible Background Commentary by Craig Keener • Take note of background information you missed

  22. Extraction Section • In the extraction section, you will be: • Retelling everything that happens in your text to the smallest detail. • Incorporating the information that you gleaned from Background research. • For a guide to formatting check out the paper on my blog: http://exegesissaves.wordpress.com/2014/03/14/exegesis-paper-example-of-formatting/

  23. Saint Patrick& Parables of Grace March 17, 2014

  24. Saint Patrick… • Who is this guy? • Why do people wear green and get drunk in his name on March 17th?

  25. Threaded Discussion 13a,b,c • SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS! Choose one of the Threaded Discussion #13(a,b,c) Subjects to post on. Each of the three is a different parable from Matthew 25.  You must post in one, and make 1 comment in each of the others. (So if you post in this one you must post in 13b and 13c.)

  26. Lost Sheep – Luke 15 • 99:1 – Normal:Lost Ratio • The shepherd SEEKS OUT the lost sheep. • Other Rabbis emphasized forgiveness for the repentant, but definitely not a God that seeks out those who have gone astray. • Who celebrates when the shepherd returns with his sheep? • HIS FRIENDS celebrate… what does that say about the Pharisees and judgmental people?

  27. Lost Coin – Luke 15 • 9:1 – Normal:Lost Ratio • The woman SEEKS OUT the lost coin. • 10 Silver Coins… probably dowry money. • This would be the only money that would be “hers”. • Why is she sweeping and carrying around a lantern? • Pre-electricity, few windows, bad flooring. • Archaeologists find many objects (pottery or coins) in the cracks of old stone or masonry flooring. • HER FRIENDS celebrate… what does that say about the Pharisees and judgmental people?

  28. Rembrandt • Simple observation of the painting?

  29. The Lost Son – Luke 15 • 1:1 – Normal:Lost Ratio • Asking for inheritance early means: • “Dad, I wish you were dead.” • A 1st century Jew would think the Father in the story was a lax pampering parent. • Inheritance norms: • Elder 2/3 • Younger 1/3 • Assets cannot be sold before parent’s death • In the far country: • Squanders (a sin to moralists) his wealth. • Famine strikes  A common disaster • The son finds himself envying pigs • A typical Jewish story would end here.

  30. The Lost Son – Luke 15 • The son reflects on the well being of his father’s “hired men” • These could either be servants or slaves. • Either way… Dad is rich. • “I have sinned against you and heaven (i.e. God)…” – the son rehearses his speech. • Before he can finish his speech… • Father runs  this violates elderly Jewish patriarchal dignity • Father’s robe = Best robe • A ring on his finger = signet ring • Sandals on his feet = a sign of wealth • Translation: I will not accept you back as a servant… I will only accept you back as a son.

  31. The Lost Son – Luke 15 • The climactic issue of the parable is 15:24-32… why is Jesus telling this parable? • The elder brother = the Pharisees • V29 – “Look…” not “Father” or “Sir” shows the older son’s disdain for the old man. • “Everything I have is yours…” Who does the rest of the inheritance belong to? • The older brother’s response is not stated, It’s open ended for the Pharisees to ponder their response. • What is your response? Will you rejoice with the Father? Or be bitter and miss the celebration?

  32. Homework • Threaded Discussion by tonight at 9pm for Extra Credit.

  33. Parables of Grace March 18, 2014

  34. The Lost Son – Luke 15 • The son reflects on the well being of his father’s “hired men” • These could either be servants or slaves. • Either way… Dad is rich. • “I have sinned against you and heaven (i.e. God)…” – the son rehearses his speech. • Before he can finish his speech… • Father runs  this violates elderly Jewish patriarchal dignity • Father’s robe = Best robe • A ring on his finger = signet ring • Sandals on his feet = a sign of wealth • Translation: I will not accept you back as a servant… I will only accept you back as a son.

  35. The Lost Son – Luke 15 • The climactic issue of the parable is 15:24-32… why is Jesus telling this parable? • The elder brother = the Pharisees • V29 – “Look…” not “Father” or “Sir” shows the older son’s disdain for the old man. • “Everything I have is yours…” Who does the rest of the inheritance belong to? • The older brother’s response is not stated, It’s open ended for the Pharisees to ponder their response. • What is your response? Will you rejoice with the Father? Or be bitter and miss the celebration?

  36. The Lost Son – Luke 15 • In Small Groups: • To which of the characters in the story do you most relate? Why?

  37. Matthew 18:21-35 • Who instigates this parable? • What question instigates the parable? • 1 Talent = 75 pounds of gold • 1 ounce of gold = $1360 • 16 ounces per pound • 10k talents = $1,020,000,000 • 1 Denarius (silver coin) ~ $20 • 100 X $20 = $2,000 • What is Jesus’ answer to Peter’s question?

  38. Matthew 18:21-35 • How do we apply this parable to our situation? • Is this something that we literally apply? • If we don’t forgive… what happens to us? • Living “by the books” vs. Trinitarian

  39. Parables of Judgment Virgins, Talents, Sheep and Goats March 18, 2014

  40. Matthew 18:21-35 • How do we apply this parable to our situation? • Is this something that we literally apply? • If we don’t forgive… what happens to us? • Living “by the books” vs. Trinitarian

  41. Ten “Virgins/Maidens/Girls” - Background • Ancient wedding practices • Who walks down the “aisle”? • Who are these girls? • “In my father’s house…”

  42. Ten “Virgins/Maidens/Girls” – The Sin • The Age of the virgins? • Probably junior high age… pre-13-year-old girls. • The sin of the foolish maidens? • They were irresponsible • They fell asleep

  43. Ten “Virgins/Maidens/Girls” • Would you expect junior high girls to be responsible and stay up all night waiting with perseverance? • What is the moral of the story? • The proclivities of your age are no excuse…

  44. Robert Farrar Capon: “Watch therefore,” Jesus says at the end of the parable, “for you know neither the day nor the hour.” When all is said and done – when we have scared ourselves silly with now-or-never urgency of faith and the once-and-always finality of judgment – we need to take a deep breath and let it out with a laugh. Be cause what we are watching for is a party. And that party is not just down the street making up its mind when to come to us. It is already hiding in our basement, banging on our steam pipes, and laughing its way up our cellar stairs. The unknown day and hour of its finally bursting into the kitchen and roistering its way through the whole house is not dreadful; it is all part of the divine lark of grace. God is not our mother-in-law, coming to see whether her wedding present china has been chipped. He is a funny Old Uncle with a salami under one arm and a bottle of wine under the other. We do indeed need to watch for him; but only because it would be such a pity to miss all the fun.

  45. Parable of the talents • How many pounds is a talent? • A talent of gold is $1.6 million • What did the two faithful servants do with the money? • What did the foolish servant do with the money? • What was his sin? • Faith = Risk

  46. Parable of the talents Up comes the weasel himself: “Oh Sir,” he says (I conflate the accounts), “Here is your coin, which I have kept bright and shiny in a handkerchief in my bureau drawer. Because, you see, I was afraid. I know you. You are a hard man. I know you grab everything, even if it doesn’t belong to you. So I thought to myself, ‘Watch your step, Arthur; if he keeps track of every penny everywhere like that, even when it’s not his, just think how mad he could get if you should happen to lose something that was his.’ And so, Sir, here I am and here’s your money, in full and on time. Tell me I’m a good boy.”

  47. Parable of the talents “As a matter of fact, Arthur, you haven’t even got that, because you know what I’m going to do? I’m going to take what I gave you and just for fun I’m going to give it to that guy over there who already has more than he knows what to do with. And you know why I’m going to do that? Firstof all, to remind everybody that when I give you a gift [grace, forgiveness] I expect you to do business with it, to keep it moving, not to just keep it to yourself in some damned napkin. But Second, I’m going to give him your gift to show everybody that I never really cared about results anyway. Don’t you see, Arthur? It’s all a game. All that matters is that you play at all, not that you play well or badly. You could have earned a million with the money I gave you, or you could have earned two cents. You could even have blown it on the horses for all I care: at least that way you would have been a gambler after my own heart.

  48. Parable of the talents “No!” roars the nobleman, twice as angry as anything Arthur ever imagined. “I will judge you out of your own mouth. You are not a good boy. You are not even a good weasel. If you knew I was such a tough customer, why didn’t you at least put my money into a savings account? What? You thought I’d be mad at a measly 4 ½ percent? You think I’m not madder at zero percent? But you know something? That’s not really what I’m mad about. Look, Arthur. I invited you into a fiduciary relationship with me… I didn’t ask you to make money… I asked you to do business. I wouldn’t mind if you took some risks with my gift of a lifetime. But what did you do? You decided you had to be more afraid of me than of the risks. You decided. You played it safe because of some imaginary fear. And so now, instead of having gotten yourself a nice new life as a mayor of at least a small city, you have only the crummy little excuse for a life you started with.

  49. Sheep and Goats • Who are the sheep? • Who are the goats? • How does a person measure which they are? • Which are you? • How does this connect with risk and proclivities of your age group? • The parable of the “sinless” man

  50. The Gracious Judgment “It is a judgment, in other words, utterly in line with the principle of inclusion before exclusion… it is a gracious, loving acceptance mourning the rejection of acceptance. Jesus has already included both the [condemned] city and the rich young man within the grace of his saving death: except for their own self-estrangement, both are loved and both are uncondemned. It is only their rejection of his acceptance… that puts them in darkness rather than light.” -Robert Farrar Capon