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Compare and contrast CBDs and edge cities PowerPoint Presentation
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Compare and contrast CBDs and edge cities

Compare and contrast CBDs and edge cities

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Compare and contrast CBDs and edge cities

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  1. Compare and contrast CBDs and edge cities

  2. Explain the difference between sprawl and smart growth.

  3. Explain the difference between gentrification and urban revitalization

  4. Sketch the following models: Burgess Harris and Ullman Hoyt Latin America

  5. People to know: • Carl Sauer • Thomas Malthus • Rostow • Wallerstein • Von Thunen • Weber • Christaller • Burgess • Hoyt • Chauncy Harris and Edward Ullman

  6. Summarize each of the following. Sketch the urban models • Thomas Malthus • Rostow • Wallerstein • Von Thunen • Weber • Christaller • Burgess • Hoyt • Chauncy Harris and Edward Ullman

  7. Sketch and label their idea. • Thomas Malthus • Rostow • Wallerstein • Von Thunen • Weber • Christaller • Burgess • Hoyt • Chauncy Harris and Edward Ullman

  8. People to know: • Carl Sauer Culture • Thomas Malthus Population • Rostow Development • Wallerstein Development • Von Thunen Agriculture • Weber Industrial • Christaller Urban • Burgess Urban • Hoyt Urban • Chauncy Harris and Edward Ullman Urban

  9. People to know: • Carl Sauer: cultural landscape • Thomas Malthus: population growth faster than food supply would mean disaster • Rostow: stage of economic development • Wallerstein: core-periphery model • Von Thunen: location theory for agriculture • Weber: location theory for industry/manufacturing • Christaller : central place theory • Burgess: Concentric urban model • Hoyt: Sector: urban model • Chauncy Harris and Edward Ullman : multiple nuclei urban model

  10. People to know: • cultural landscape • population growth faster than food supply would mean disaster • stage of economic development • core-periphery model • location theory for agriculture • location theory for industry/manufacturing • central place theory • Concentric urban model • Sector: urban model • multiple nuclei urban model

  11. Carl Sauer: cultural landscape

  12. Thomas Malthus: population growth faster than food supply

  13. Rostow: stage of economic development US economist Walter Rostow, argued that countries would progress through five stages

  14. Progressive stages of economic growth. Rostow Model

  15. Strength of the Modernization model: Over the long term, all countries are capable of development. It has proved to works for some countries: Singapore, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan (Asian Dragons) the American South, Czech Republic, Ireland

  16. Rostow’s model did not account for regional constraints

  17. Wallerstein: core-periphery model Immanuel Wallerstein, a leading advocate of the approach characterizes the world system as a set of mechanisms which redistributes resources from the periphery to the core.

  18. Dependency School of Thought/Model (1970s).Sees low development levels as being a result of the LDCs economic dependency on the MDCs.

  19. Dependency real world strategies. Invest and improve human welfare (education, health, food, water, and shelter needs). redistribute capital in more even manner (socialism) a bottom-up strategy

  20. import substitution: an LDC tries to develop its own industries instead of importing manufactured goods from the MDCs

  21. nationalization: To convert from private to governmental ownership and control (natural resources)

  22. high import tariffs (to protect infant home-grown industries) • Self sufficiency (economic independence)

  23. Von Thunen’s Agricultural ModelA land use model used to explain the importance of proximity to the market in the choice of crops on commercial farms(this created a concentric pattern: circles sharing the same centers)

  24. Because farmers must pay to transport their produce to the market, and these costs are directly proportional to distance, the profit for each product declines as a straight line with increasing distance from the market

  25. Weber’s least cost theoryaccounted for the location of a manufacturing plant in terms of the owner’s desire to minimize three categories of costs. 1. Transportation 2. Labor 3. Agglomeration

  26. Do Activity

  27. Weber's model attempts to explain industrial location.

  28. B. Transporting raw materials costs less than finished product (maybe finished product delicate/more packaging)‏

  29. C. Transporting raw materials costs more than finished product (loss in bulk)‏

  30. Christaller : central place theory

  31. FR Define and describe the major principles of Walter Christaller’s central place theory. central place: a settlement in which certain types of goods and services are available to consumers.

  32. Walter Christaller formulated theCentral place theory: A theory that explains the distribution of services, based on the fact that settlements serve as centers of market areas for services.

  33. larger settlements are fewer and farther apart than smaller settlements

  34. larger settlements provide services for a larger number of people who are willing to travel farther.

  35. towns and cities (central places) tend to be arranged in clear, orderly hierarchies

  36. Under ideal circumstances (on flat plains, with good transportation in every direction),with hexagonal-shaped market areas of different sizes arranged around different-sized places

  37. FR Draw a diagram to help illustrate the central place theory.Extra material in notes to help understand for the FR Note: look at the 4 different size of market areas

  38. Burgess: Concentric urban model

  39. Hoyt: Sector: urban model

  40. Harris Ullman : multiple nuclei urban model

  41. sketch

  42. CARL Sauer: Cultural Landscape

  43. Malthus: Malnutrition

  44. Malthus: too many mouths to feed