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TLC Monthly Webinar for Tutor Coordinators

TLC Monthly Webinar for Tutor Coordinators

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TLC Monthly Webinar for Tutor Coordinators

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  1. TLC Monthly Webinar for Tutor Coordinators January 21, 2014 10:00am – 11:00am Tutor Retention and Motivation

  2. Agenda • Review of use of webinar platform • Updates • Tutor Retention and Motivation • Sharing • Next webinar • February 18, 2013, 10:00 – 11:00 am • Tutor Recruitment and Selection

  3. Navigation of GoToMeeting

  4. Updates for Tutor Coordinators

  5. Updates • Tutor conference, March 16, 2014 • 65 registered • Please continue to promote with tutors • Tutor coordinators can now register Registration link paacesite.org > Upcoming Events and Conferences > Read More

  6. Tutor retention and motivation

  7. Retention and motivationhand-in-hand

  8. “I believe that a large contributor to our tutor retention has been our community building activities, from a tutor email list to coffee and snacks at the class space to our twice yearly celebrations for all students and tutors in the program. The end of year celebration includes small but appreciated tutor thank you gifts, but more importantly it includes recognitions of student gains for every adult learner and this most of all gives the tutors a sense that what they have done is noticed and valued.”

  9. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Have a “Senior Advisor” tutor

  10. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Have a “Senior Advisor” tutor • Send thank you notes (weekly) • Say ”Thank you” and tell the tutors that their time and work is appreciated

  11. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Have a “Senior Advisor” tutor • Send thank you notes (weekly) • Birthday, holiday cards • handwritten 'anniversary' card, commemorating their service with our agency. • I've had tutors tell me my messy handwriting is more appreciated than the very professional certificates we also send out for anniversaries!

  12. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Have a “Senior Advisor” tutor • Send thank you notes (weekly) • Birthday, holiday cards • Offer trainings every 2 weeks

  13. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Have a “Senior Advisor” tutor • Send thank you notes (weekly) • Birthday, holiday cards • Offer trainings every 2 weeks • FEED them

  14. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Have a “Senior Advisor” tutor • Send thank you notes (weekly) • Birthday, holiday cards • Offer trainings every 2 weeks • FEED them • Have formal recognition ~ 2/yr

  15. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Have a “Senior Advisor” tutor • Send thank you notes (weekly) • Birthday, holiday cards • Offer trainings every 2 weeks • FEED them • Have formal recognition ~ 2/yr • Informal tutor get-togethers

  16. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Have a “Senior Advisor” tutor • Send thank you notes (weekly) • Birthday, holiday cards • Offer trainings every 2 weeks • FEED them • Have formal recognition ~ 2/yr • Informal tutor get-togethers • Tutor “reunions”

  17. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Have a “Senior Advisor” tutor • Send thank you notes (weekly) • Birthday, holiday cards • Offer trainings every 2 weeks • FEED them • Have formal recognition ~ 2/yr • Informal tutor get-togethers • Tutor “reunions” • Have staff person to organize/manage this! (That’s the only job (s)he has!)

  18. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Have a “Senior Advisor” tutor • Send thank you notes (weekly) • Birthday, holiday cards • Offer trainings every 2 weeks • FEED them • Have formal recognition ~ 2/yr • Informal tutor get-togethers • Tutor “reunions” • Give reminder calls for events, professional development, etc. • Personalize my involvement with my tutors as much as possible ~ RELATIONSHIP!

  19. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Have a “Senior Advisor” tutor • Send thank you notes (weekly) • Birthday, holiday cards • Offer trainings every 2 weeks • FEED them • Have formal recognition ~ 2/yr • Informal tutor get-togethers • Tutor “reunions” • Give reminder calls for events, professional development, etc. • Give shirts w/program logo

  20. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers Retention • Many appreciate the variety of tasks that we ask them to complete: • Working individually with a student. • Administrative work organizing our materials and books. • Working with our case managers to help a student fill out job applications or finding resources, like assistance with housing, clothing, food, or furniture. • Doing research for other resources for class such as good websites to practice computer skills. • Checklist of availability/interests.

  21. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers Retention • Many appreciate the variety of tasks that we ask them to complete: • Working individually with a student. • Administrative work organizing our materials and books. • Working with our case managers to help a student fill out job applications or finding resources, like assistance with housing, clothing, food, or furniture. • Doing research for other resources for class such as good websites to practice computer skills. • Checklist of availability/interests. • Tutor coordinator is available to answer questions and sometimes be a mediator between teacher and tutor • Be available with suggestions of techniques that can be tried when working with learners

  22. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers Retention • Many appreciate the variety of tasks that we ask them to complete: • Working individually with a student. • Administrative work organizing our materials and books. • Working with our case managers to help a student fill out job applications or finding resources, like assistance with housing, clothing, food, or furniture. • Doing research for other resources for class such as good websites to practice computer skills. • Checklist of availability/interests. • Tutor coordinator is available to answer questions and sometimes be a mediator between teacher and tutor • Be available with suggestions of techniques that can be tried when working with learners • Retention seems to be best when the reward suits the recipient’s personality and need for recognition. • For instance, most volunteer tutors are satisfied with recognition in the quarterly newsletter or at the Celebration Event (via certificate). • Some are just embarrassed at any such attention and are satisfied with a phone call or email from their coordinator.

  23. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Provide resources and support

  24. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Provide resources and support • Show and celebrate successes – w/assessments

  25. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Provide resources and support • Show and celebrate successes – w/assessments • Learner input – meet their needs

  26. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Provide resources and support • Show and celebrate successes – w/assessments • Learner input – meet their needs • Revisit goals

  27. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Provide resources and support • Show and celebrate successes – w/assessments • Learner input – meet their needs • Revisit goals • Celebrate success

  28. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Treat each volunteer professionally and with respect.

  29. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Treat each volunteer professionally and with respect. • Provide training, workshops, in-services.

  30. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Treat each volunteer professionally and with respect. • Provide training, workshops, in-services. • Be specific about responsibilities.

  31. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Treat each volunteer professionally and with respect. • Provide training, workshops, in-services. • Be specific about responsibilities. • Explain their support system.

  32. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Treat each volunteer professionally and with respect. • Provide training, workshops, in-services. • Be specific about responsibilities. • Explain their support system. • Listen to volunteers’ questions.

  33. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Treat each volunteer professionally and with respect. • Provide training, workshops, in-services. • Be specific about responsibilities. • Explain their support system. • Listen to volunteers’ questions. • Provide networking time.

  34. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Treat each volunteer professionally and with respect. • Provide training, workshops, in-services. • Be specific about responsibilities. • Explain their support system. • Listen to volunteers’ questions. • Provide networking time. • Provide access to the appropriate materials they might need.

  35. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Treat each volunteer professionally and with respect. • Provide training, workshops, in-services. • Be specific about responsibilities. • Explain their support system. • Listen to volunteers’ questions. • Provide networking time. • Provide access to the appropriate materials they might need • Meet with volunteers on a regular basis.

  36. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Treat each volunteer professionally and with respect. • Provide training, workshops, in-services. • Be specific about responsibilities. • Explain their support system. • Listen to volunteers’ questions. • Provide networking time. • Provide access to the appropriate materials they might need. • Meet with volunteers on a regular basis. • Have an end of the year recognition activity.

  37. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Treat each volunteer professionally and with respect. • Provide training, workshops, in-services. • Be specific about responsibilities. • Explain their support system. • Listen to volunteers’ questions. • Provide networking time. • Provide access to the appropriate materials they might need • Meet with volunteers on a regular basis. • Have an end of the year recognition activity. • Include volunteers in holiday activities.

  38. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Treat each volunteer professionally and with respect. • Provide training, workshops, in-services. • Be specific about responsibilities. • Explain their support system. • Listen to volunteers’ questions. • Provide networking time. • Provide access to the appropriate materials they might need. • Meet with volunteers on a regular basis. • Have an end of the year recognition activity. • Include volunteers in holiday activities. • Nurture all volunteers and recognize their achievements.

  39. Volunteer RetentionSuggestions from Peers • Treat each volunteer professionally and with respect. • Provide training, workshops, in-services. • Be specific about responsibilities. • Explain their support system. • Listen to volunteers’ questions. • Provide networking time. • Provide access to the appropriate materials they might need. • Meet with volunteers on a regular basis. • Have an end of the year recognition activity. • Include volunteers in holiday activities. • Nurture all volunteers and recognize their achievements. • Never miss a chance to offer praise or thanks.

  40. Charity Village https://charityvillage.com/Content.aspx?topic=how_to_get_the_best_from_your_volunteer_work_force How to Get the Best from Your Volunteer Work Force

  41. How to Get the Best from Your Volunteer Work Force • Assign someone, either staff or volunteer, whose sole responsibility is making certain volunteers are properly and quickly thanked when the activity is over, or on a regular basis (less frequently than once per quarter).

  42. How to Get the Best from Your Volunteer Work Force • Assign someone, either staff or volunteer, whose sole responsibility is making certain volunteers are properly and quickly thanked when the activity is over, or on a regular basis (less frequently than once per quarter). • Make volunteers believe that your campaign is their campaign.

  43. How to Get the Best from Your Volunteer Work Force • Assign someone, either staff or volunteer, whose sole responsibility is making certain volunteers are properly and quickly thanked when the activity is over, or on a regular basis (less frequently than once per quarter). • Make volunteers believe that your campaign is their campaign. • Avoid comparing volunteers or teams with each other. Compare the results of volunteer effort against targets, not other volunteers.

  44. How to Get the Best from Your Volunteer Work Force • Assign someone, either staff or volunteer, whose sole responsibility is making certain volunteers are properly and quickly thanked when the activity is over, or on a regular basis (less frequently than once per quarter). • Make volunteers believe that your campaign is their campaign. • Avoid comparing volunteers or teams with each other. Compare the results of volunteer effort against targets, not other volunteers. • Be available, or see that someone is available, to give immediate attention to volunteer queries.

  45. How to Get the Best from Your Volunteer Work Force • Assign someone, either staff or volunteer, whose sole responsibility is making certain volunteers are properly and quickly thanked when the activity is over, or on a regular basis (less frequently than once per quarter). • Make volunteers believe that your campaign is their campaign. • Avoid comparing volunteers or teams with each other. Compare the results of volunteer effort against targets, not other volunteers. • Be available, or see that someone is available, to give immediate attention to volunteer queries. • Assign volunteers to work in areas in which they will look good.

  46. How to Get the Best from Your Volunteer Work Force • Assign someone, either staff or volunteer, whose sole responsibility is making certain volunteers are properly and quickly thanked when the activity is over, or on a regular basis (less frequently than once per quarter). • Make volunteers believe that your campaign is their campaign. • Avoid comparing volunteers or teams with each other. Compare the results of volunteer effort against targets, not other volunteers. • Be available, or see that someone is available, to give immediate attention to volunteer queries. • Assign volunteers to work in areas in which they will look good. • Organize volunteer events carefully. Be prepared prior to the arrival of the volunteers.

  47. How to Get the Best from Your Volunteer Work Force • Assign someone, either staff or volunteer, whose sole responsibility is making certain volunteers are properly and quickly thanked when the activity is over, or on a regular basis (less frequently than once per quarter). • Make volunteers believe that your campaign is their campaign. • Avoid comparing volunteers or teams with each other. Compare the results of volunteer effort against targets, not other volunteers. • Be available, or see that someone is available, to give immediate attention to volunteer queries. • Assign volunteers to work in areas in which they will look good. • Organize volunteer events carefully. Be prepared prior to the arrival of the volunteers. • All brainstorming and planning should be finished, and you should be ready to assign specific tasks. A well-organized program is more likely to attract repeat support.

  48. Tutor Motivation (and/or Retention…)

  49. From Veteran TCs to New TCs, 2012 • Build relationships with tutors and with community.

  50. From Veteran TCs to New TCs, 2012 • Build relationships with tutors and with community. • Let volunteers know requirements right away- and ask “Can you do this?”