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Mystery Founder

Mystery Founder

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Mystery Founder

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  1. Mystery Founder ?

  2. Mystery Founder ¡spɹɐʍʞɔɐq ƃuıoƃ ǝɹɐ ǝʍ ʞǝǝʍ sıɥʇ

  3. Mystery Founder

  4. Mystery Founder He has rarely worked for anyone else and never looked for a job.

  5. Mystery Founder “I wouldn’t know how”

  6. Mystery Founder “I don’t even have a business card”

  7. Mystery Founder Our guy DID go to College!

  8. Mystery Founder However, He took seven years to complete college.

  9. Mystery Founder He tried two other schools before graduating from Boston University with a degree in psychology in 1971.

  10. Mystery Founder He raised money from family and friends to start CAP (originally Child at Play) Toys.

  11. Mystery Founder “I figured I’d never run out of ideas.” Plus, he could test his notions on his kids and their friends.

  12. Mystery Founder “There were times when I embarrassed my kids — I’d pull out a toy and show it to their friends at the ball field or something.”

  13. Mystery Founder CAP nearly closed its first year when its first product — a blooming doll in a flowerpot — flopped. That underscored for our guy - what he says is the key to entrepreneurship — finding a way to survive. “If I wrote a book, that’s what it would be called "Finding a Way".

  14. Mystery Founder CAP nearly closed its first year when its first product — a blooming doll in a flowerpot — flopped.

  15. Mystery Founder Their risk paid off. By his second year, he had a hit toy.

  16. Mystery Founder That underscored for our guy - what he says is the key to entrepreneurship — finding a way to survive. “If I wrote a book, that’s what it would be called "Finding a Way".

  17. Mystery Founder CAP’s Arcade Basketball hoop hung from the back of a door and kept score.

  18. Mystery Founder Then another hit - CAP developed the Stretch Armstrong doll – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTYEslLMZjE

  19. Mystery Founder Oh yea – then the big win……

  20. Mystery Founder Candy

  21. Mystery Founder Yes, candy

  22. Mystery Founder A lollipop.

  23. Mystery Founder A lollipop. NO!

  24. Mystery Founder

  25. Mystery Founder More important, the Spin Pop, a lollipop with a battery-operated handle that twirled the candy in the eater’s mouth.

  26. Mystery Founder Payday!

  27. Mystery Founder Osher sold CAP to Hasbro in 1997 for $120 million.

  28. Mystery Founder Mainly, he says, the big toy company wanted the candy division, which by then had sales of $70 million a year.

  29. Mystery Founder Hasbro had to have the SpinPop.

  30. Mystery Founder He took a year and a half off and then persuaded a group of designers he’d worked with on the Spin Pop to join him in a new venture. He wasn’t sure what exactly they would make, only that it had to appeal to the mass market.

  31. Mystery Founder Our guy sensed an untapped market.

  32. Mystery Founder What did our guy make that really made him a lot of money?

  33. Mystery Founder

  34. Mystery Founder

  35. Mystery Founder Electric toothbrushes had been around for years but, at about $80 to $120 each, they were too expensive for many buyers.

  36. Mystery Founder Plus, our guy and his partners knew that they could employ the same sort of technology they had used on the Spin Pop.

  37. Mystery Founder Doing something new from something he had done before seemed like a great (EASY) idea.

  38. Mystery Founder “Our advantage was that we were trying to design up from 80 cents, while everybody else was trying to design down from $79.”

  39. Mystery Founder To succeed, the product could cost only a few dollars more than a conventional toothbrush and had to have a long-lasting battery. And its packaging had to have the Try Me feature. That amounted to free advertising and could win over skeptics.

  40. Mystery Founder In 1999, our guy and his partners formed a company called Dr. Johns Products and, later that year, rolled out the brushes in a chain of Midwestern stores called Meijers.

  41. Mystery Founder Meanwhile, Colgate was kicking Crest’s butt.

  42. Mystery Founder They formulated an exit strategy – Sell to P&G (Crest).

  43. Mystery Founder Crest was the market champ since the 1960’s. Colgate edged out Crest with the launch of Total Colgate was also pushing the Whitening.

  44. Mystery Founder P&G – Crest was in trouble and they needed help. They would really hungry to win back this toothpaste market.

  45. Mystery Founder Colgate was up to 29.6% versus Crest’s 25.6%

  46. Mystery Founder P&G quickly caught on. Procter & Gamble, based in his hometown, soon came calling.

  47. Mystery Founder P&G quickly caught on. Procter & Gamble, based in his hometown, soon came calling.

  48. Mystery Founder The deal our guy and his associates struck allowed them to join the company for a year to ensure that their invention was properly launched.

  49. Mystery Founder Its packaging had to have the Try Me feature. That amounted to free advertising and could win over skeptics.

  50. Mystery Founder Its packaging had to have the Try Me feature. That amounted to free advertising and could win over skeptics.