Download
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Purpose PowerPoint Presentation

Purpose

90 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Purpose

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Purpose The purpose of this project is to further enhance key KTS practices currently being implemented across NSW and ensure that outcomes for families are effective and consistent across the sector. The three topic areas this project focuses on includes: • Chapter 16A information exchange • Engaging clients and their families • Collaborative practice and integrated case management

  2. Ground rules for safe training • Learning not disclosure • Respect not blame • Acknowledge ‘grey’ areas • Confidentiality

  3. Keep Them Safe Change Management Project “Train the Trainer Project” Topic 1: Information Exchange

  4. Learning Outcomes At the end of these sessions participants should be able to: • Identify the policy and procedures involved in chapter 16A information exchange • Apply the relevant policy and procedures to various case examples, suitable to different contexts and challenges that arise in practice across the NGO and Government sector • Increase confidence in initiating and responding to information exchange requests • Develop appropriate strategies and procedures for responding to information exchange in the organisational context

  5. Issues explored in this topic: • Background to topic: Information Exchange • Issue 1: What the legislation tells us • Issue 2: Who, what and when to exchange • Issue 3: Requesting information • Issue 4: Agreeing/ responding to an information request • Issue 5: Providing information • Issue 6: Declining a request & challenging a decline • Issue 7: Gaining consent & when not to • Issue 8: Confidentiality, identity of reporter and record keeping

  6. Getting started on Information Exchange

  7. Background to topic: Information exchange

  8. Issue 1: What the legislation tells us

  9. Issue 2: Who, what and when

  10. Issue 2: Who, what and when

  11. Issue 2: Who, what and when

  12. Case Studies – Group 1 • Case Study 1 - Serena (Child care centre, primary school, health centre) • Case Study 2 - John (Private catholic school and police or Police CWU, Community Services) • Case Study 3 – The Jones Family (Community Services, baby health centre, child care centre, school and Salvation Army Family Centre) • Case Study 4 - Daniel (Juvenile Justice, high school, primary school, family support service) • Case Study 5 – Karen Walker (Health service, community centre) • Case Study 6 - Matthew Vinson (Primary school, health service)

  13. Information exchange & the case study activities

  14. Issue 3: Requesting information Issue 4: Agreeing/ responding to an information request Issue 5: Providing information

  15. Case Studies – Group 2 • Case Study 7 - Kelly (Police, women’s refuge, Community Services) • Case Study 8 – Anna Curran (Aboriginal Intensive Family Support Service (IFBS), primary school, health service) • Case Study 9 - Aiden & Alexis (ADHC, mental health services, child care centre) • Case Study 10 – Malcolm Bedford (Primary school, family support service, Community Services) • Case Study 11 – Janice (Housing NSW, Family and Community Services CWU, Community Services, GP, preschool, mental health services, family support services)

  16. Issue 6: Declining a request & challenging a decline

  17. Issue 7: Gaining consent & when not to • Consent is not necessary for exchange of information under Chapter 16A and there are some specific occasions when it should not be sought. However, as it is a principle of the Act that a child or young person should be given an opportunity to express views on personal matters, consent should be sought where possible. • Best practice recommends that consent is sought from parents and/or carers before information relating to them, is exchanged. • For many services working on a voluntary basis with families the decision to act without the family’s consent may be significant to the continuing relationship.

  18. Information exchange Unborn children

  19. Issue 8: Confidentiality, identity of reporter and record keeping

  20. Case Studies – Group 3 • Case Study 12 – Jim Matthews (Community Services, health counselling service, Health NSW) • Case Study 13 – The Wright Family (ADHC, family support service, primary school) • Case Study 14 - Marisa (Catholic/Independent high school, family support service) • Case Study 15 – Harry and Violet Smith (Housing NSW, Family and Community Services CWU, family support service, Department of Education & Communities CWU, primary school)

  21. Practice tool

  22. Information exchange Concluding the session/s • What are some of key messages you will take from this session? 2. What is one strategy that you will take away and implement in your workplace?

  23. Positive outcomes for children and families are achieved through development of a relationship with the family that recognises their strengths and their needs. Principle 4, Special Inquiry into Child Protection Intervention

  24. Learning Outcomes • Identify different pathways to engagement for vulnerable children, young people and families • Increase worker confidence in addressing conversations with families including difficult conversations about concerns • Develop strategies that encourage families to engage in service provision to address concerns

  25. Engaging families Issue 1: Engaging families Issue 2: Crisis as a pathway to engagement Issue 3: Building trust with people on the edges Issue 4: Promoting buy in Issue 5:On the receiving end Issue 6: Cold calling Issue 7: Difficult conversations

  26. Issue 1:Engaging families Key messages: • Engagement: Relationship and direction • Engagement as a process • Reframing resistance and hostility

  27. Effective engagement Features of a trusting relationship include: • Someone who listens • Respect • Being non-judgmental • Being trustworthy Shared direction means: • Both practitioner and family members share the same understanding of the goals and tasks to be achieved.

  28. Effective engagement Getting to know you Growing Graduating

  29. How would this exercise apply to: • Schools • Emergency relief program • Juvenile Justice • Methadone clinic

  30. Issue 2: Crisis as a pathway to engagement Key Messages: • Crisis as an opportunity

  31. Crisis as a pathway to engagement

  32. Developing case studies • Start with family members • Background • Complication – related to learning task • General agency locations • Avoid real family examples • Descriptions not labels for behaviour • Proof read

  33. Issue 3: Building trust with people at the edges Key points: • Go where families are • Non-stigmatising services • Empowering strategies • Develop relationships

  34. Issue 4: Promoting Buy In Key point: • Relationships alone are not enough • What would be helpful?

  35. Issue 5: On the receiving end Key point: • Reflecting on personal experience

  36. Issue 6: Cold calling Key point: • Applying the relationship/being helpful framework to cold calling

  37. Issue 7: Difficult conversations Key points: • What’s the message? • Urgency • Where to start?

  38. Difficult conversations

  39. Starting difficult conversations

  40. Learning Outcomes • Identify the key elements of case management and the role of case management in supporting families • Identify various the roles and responsibilities and the approaches that both government and non government services may take to address the needs of families and develop a collaborative approach • Develop, or enhance, interagency networks to support collaborative case management practice

  41. Collaborative practice and case management Issue 1: Starting with the child Issue 2: Understanding case management Issue 3: Prioritising case management Issue 4: Keeping the team connected Issue 5: Collaboration and integrated case management in practice Issue 6: Building collaborative networks

  42. Issue 1: Starting with the child Key messages: • Start with the child • Help families access help through referral

  43. Issue 2: Understanding case management Key messages: • Elements of case management • Who is responsible?

  44. Increasing risk DOCUMENT AND CONTINUE RELATIONSHIP CONSULT YOUR REFERRAL NETWORK CONSULT WITH A PROFESSIONAL Do what you’d usually do Look for relevant referrals • Seek guidance • Relevant referrals • Info exchange • Option to report

  45. NO ROSH but family open to/may benefit from services Contact Family referral service if available Discuss actions with supervisor or colleague And/ or report to the Helpline. Refer or seek further information

  46. ROSH Threshold not met. Still have professional concerns? Discuss actions with supervisor or colleague And/ or report to the Helpline. Refer or seek further information