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Inhibitory and Excitatory Signals

Inhibitory and Excitatory Signals

Inhibitory and Excitatory Signals . Excitatory Potentials. Excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) occurs when membrane potential goes toward threshold (becomes more depolarized). ACh and Glutamate gated ion channels are excitatory.

By zuzana
(798 views)

The Dopamine Transporter (DAT) is responsible for re-uptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft

The Dopamine Transporter (DAT) is responsible for re-uptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft

Oligomerization of the Dopamine Transporter: cocaine-analog-induced conformational changes at a homodimer interface Jonathan A. Javitch, MD,PhD Columbia University. The Dopamine Transporter (DAT) is responsible for re-uptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. Amph.

By badu
(279 views)

Nucleotide Metabolism

Nucleotide Metabolism

Nucleotide Metabolism. Pathways in nucleotide metabolism. De novo and salvage pathways Nucleic acid degradation and the importance of nucleotide salvage PRPP. Biosynthetic Routes: De novo and salvage pathways.

By ivan
(993 views)

Academic Half-Day The Chemical Basis for Neuronal Communication

Academic Half-Day The Chemical Basis for Neuronal Communication

Academic Half-Day The Chemical Basis for Neuronal Communication. Marie-Pierre Thibeault-Eybalin, R4 November 5 th , 2008. Introduction. 100 billion (10 11 ) neurons in the brain Up to 100,000 terminal contacts / neuron 10 16 connections between neurons / brain Connections = Synapses

By lequoia
(207 views)

DAT

DAT

PKC phosphorylates the transporter. DAG and AA both stimulate the activity of Protein Kinase C (PKC). PLA2 produces arachidonic acid. PLC produces IP3 and DAG. High intracellular pH stimulates Phospholipase A2 action. Transporter of the amphetamine and Na+ lead to an AMPH and Na+ build up.

By september
(150 views)

Genomics, Bioinformatics & Medicine http://biochem158.stanford.edu/

Genomics, Bioinformatics & Medicine http://biochem158.stanford.edu/

Genomics, Bioinformatics & Medicine http://biochem158.stanford.edu/. Gene Expression http://biochem158.stanford.edu/Gene%20Expression.html. Doug Brutlag Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry & Medicine Stanford University School of Medicine. Leveraging Genomic Information. Novel Diagnostics

By gaenor
(259 views)

MAP kinase Pathways in Yeast

MAP kinase Pathways in Yeast

MAP kinase Pathways in Yeast. How are signals specified between pathways that share Common components? MAP = mitogen activated protein kinase. FGP ? Cdc42/Ste20 Ste11 Ste7 Kss1 Ste12/ Tec1. PRP Ste2/3/4/18 Cdc42/Ste20 Ste11 Ste7 Fus3 Ste12. Ste5. Two MAP kinase pathways.

By ken
(142 views)

Chapter 11 Cell Communication

Chapter 11 Cell Communication

Chapter 11 Cell Communication. Question?. How do cells communicate? By “cellular” phones. But seriously, cells do need to communicate for many reasons. Why do cells communicate?. Regulation - cells need to control cellular processes.

By bennett
(3 views)

Cell Communication

Cell Communication

Cell Communication. Chapter 7. 7.1 Cell Communication: An Overview. Cells communicate with one another through Direct channels of communication Specific contact between cells Intercellular chemical messengers. Apoptosis. Fig. 7-1, p. 140. Intercellular Chemical Messengers.

By jerrod
(112 views)

Review: Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, entropy Work and energy storage/utilization in biological systems

Review: Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, entropy Work and energy storage/utilization in biological systems

Review: Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, entropy Work and energy storage/utilization in biological systems Types of chemical bonding (covalent, H-bonding, electrostatic, Van der Waal’s) The hydrophobic effect Protein microenvironments Properties of water, acid-base equilibria.

By Patman
(258 views)

Protein Degradation and Regulation Ubiquitin/Proteasome Pathway Guo Peng, Luo Tong and Yang Kong 2002.12.16

Protein Degradation and Regulation Ubiquitin/Proteasome Pathway Guo Peng, Luo Tong and Yang Kong 2002.12.16

Protein Degradation and Regulation Ubiquitin/Proteasome Pathway Guo Peng, Luo Tong and Yang Kong 2002.12.16. I. Introduction. This pathway is the major non-lysosomal process responsible for the breakdown of most short and long-lived proteins in mammalian cells.

By tivona
(239 views)

Cellular Communication

Cellular Communication

Cellular Communication. Chemical messages which elicit a response in cells serve as a form of communication between cells Found in all cells S imilar in widely different organisms (such as humans and yeast) leads one to believe that this evolved very early in the history of life

By trudy
(124 views)

ATP Powered Pumps

ATP Powered Pumps

ATP Powered Pumps. By Adam Attebery. Introduction . General information about ATP activated pumps Four different classes of ATP activated transmembrane proteins Function and examples of each Mechanism of each. ATP Powered Pumps .

By benjamin
(787 views)

FIGURE 11.1. The glucose carrier switches easily between two shapes.

FIGURE 11.1. The glucose carrier switches easily between two shapes.

FIGURE 11.1. The glucose carrier switches easily between two shapes. UNFIGURE 11.1. .

By dianthe
(124 views)

Photosynthesis

Photosynthesis

Photosynthesis. Plants making their own food. Role of Photosynthesis. Plants use it to make food Animals get their food from plants It produces oxygen which is needed in respiration to release energy It is responsible for forming fossil fuels It removes carbon dioxide from the air.

By gitano
(223 views)

What does a cell need? Building blocks 	biological molecules, ions, metals, water, etc. Catalysts (enzymes) 	reactions h

What does a cell need? Building blocks biological molecules, ions, metals, water, etc. Catalysts (enzymes) reactions h

What does a cell need? Building blocks biological molecules, ions, metals, water, etc. Catalysts (enzymes) reactions happen rapidly enough to sustain life Information nucleic acids Energy. What do we need energy for? synthesis mechanical work active transport

By eben
(110 views)

General Shape of a Smooth Muscle Cell

General Shape of a Smooth Muscle Cell

General Shape of a Smooth Muscle Cell. Smooth Muscle Motor Units?. Contraction Patterns in Smooth Muscles. Phasic (quick, SkMus-like) and tonic contractions. EC Coupling in Smooth Muscle. Thin and Thick Filament Arrangements in Smooth Muscle. Caldesmon. Caldesmon In Relaxed Fibers.

By adli
(266 views)

a look into Cellular Respiration

a look into Cellular Respiration

a look into Cellular Respiration. All organisms need a s ource of energy and a source of Carbon!. What is a heterotroph ?. An organism that needs to CONSUME something for food/energy. What substance is required for cellular respiration to occur?. Glucose. Where does glucose come from?.

By roxy
(64 views)

Growth Factors and Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

Growth Factors and Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

Growth Factors and Receptor Tyrosine Kinases. RTK’s--How do they work? EGFR signaling and ras MAP k inase cascades PI3K, PKB, PLC g PTPs (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases). Epidermal growth factor. Neurotrophic growth factor (NGF) isolated from mouse

By saxton
(152 views)

Enzyme Regulation

Enzyme Regulation

Enzyme Regulation. C483 Spring 2013. Questions. 1. Which statement is false about allosteric regulation? A) It is usually the mode of regulation for the last step in reaction pathways since this step produces the final product.

By walt
(306 views)

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