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Figure 35.0 The effect of submersion in water on leaf development in Cabomba PowerPoint Presentation
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Figure 35.0 The effect of submersion in water on leaf development in Cabomba

Figure 35.0 The effect of submersion in water on leaf development in Cabomba

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Figure 35.0 The effect of submersion in water on leaf development in Cabomba

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  1. Figure 35.0 The effect of submersion in water on leaf development in Cabomba

  2. Figure 35.0x The effect of wind on plant form in fir trees

  3. Figure 35.2 Morphology of a flowering plant: an overview

  4. Figure 35.1 A comparison of monocots and dicots

  5. Figure 35.3 Radish root hairs

  6. Figure 35.4 Modified shoots: Stolons, strawberry (top left); rhizomes, iris (top right); tubers, potato (bottom left); bulb, onion (bottom right)

  7. Figure 35.5 Simple versus compound leaves

  8. Figure 35.6 Modified leaves: Tendrils, pea plant (top left); spines, cacti (top right); succulent (bottom left); brightly-colored leaves, poinsettia (bottom right)

  9. Figure 35.6x Lithops, a stone-mimicking plant from South African deserts

  10. Figure 35.7 The three tissue systems

  11. Figure 35.8 Water-conducting cells of xylem

  12. Figure 35.9 Food-conducting cells of the phloem

  13. Figure 35.10 Review of general plant cell structure

  14. Figure 35.11 The three major categories of plant cells

  15. Figure 35.12 Locations of major meristems: an overview of plant growth

  16. Figure 35.13 Morphology of a winter twig

  17. Figure 36.18 Tapping phloem sap with the help of an aphid

  18. Figure 35.14 Primary growth of a root

  19. Figure 35.15 Organization of primary tissues in young roots

  20. Figure 35.16 The formation of lateral roots

  21. Figure 35.17 The terminal bud and primary growth of a shoot

  22. Figure 35.18 Organization of primary tissues in young stems

  23. Figure 35.19 Leaf anatomy

  24. Figure 35.20 Production of secondary xylem and phloem by the vascular cambium

  25. Figure 35.21 Secondary growth of a stem (Layer 1)

  26. Figure 35.21 Secondary growth of a stem (Layer 2)

  27. Figure 35.21 Secondary growth of a stem (Layer 3)

  28. Figure 35.22 Anatomy of a three-year-old stem

  29. Figure 35.22x Secondary growth of a stem

  30. Figure 35.23 Anatomy of a tree trunk

  31. Figure 35.24 A summary of primary and secondary growth in a woody stem

  32. Figure 36.0 Eucalyptus trees

  33. Figure 36.0x Trees

  34. Figure 36.1 An overview of transport in whole plants (Layer 1)

  35. Figure 36.1 An overview of transport in whole plants (Layer 2)

  36. Figure 36.1 An overview of transport in whole plants (Layer 3)

  37. Figure 36.1 An overview of transport in whole plants (Layer 4)

  38. Figure 36.2 A chemiosmotic model of solute transport in plant cells

  39. Figure 36.3 Water potential and water movement: a mechanical model

  40. Figure 36.4 Water relations of plant cells

  41. Figure 36.5 A watered tomato plant regains its turgor

  42. Figure 36.6 Compartments of plant cells and tissues and routes for lateral transport

  43. Figure 36.7 Lateral transport of minerals and water in roots

  44. Figure 36.8 Mycorrhizae, symbiotic associations of fungi and roots

  45. Figure 36.9 Guttation

  46. Figure 36.12x Stomata on the underside of a leaf

  47. Figure 35.19 Leaf anatomy

  48. Figure 36.10 The generation of transpirational pull in a leaf

  49. Figure 36.11 Ascent of water in a tree

  50. Figure 36.12 An open (left) and closed (right) stoma of a spider plant (Chlorophytum colosum) leaf