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MAINTENANCE OF COMPLEX EQUIPMENT: ISSUES AND CHALLENGES PowerPoint Presentation
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MAINTENANCE OF COMPLEX EQUIPMENT: ISSUES AND CHALLENGES

MAINTENANCE OF COMPLEX EQUIPMENT: ISSUES AND CHALLENGES

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MAINTENANCE OF COMPLEX EQUIPMENT: ISSUES AND CHALLENGES

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  1. MAINTENANCE OF COMPLEX EQUIPMENT: ISSUES AND CHALLENGES Professor Pra Murthy The University of Queensland Brisbane, Australia

  2. NEED FOR EQUIPMENT • Businesses use a variety of equipment to produce output and services • Equipment unreliable – failure due to failure of one or more components • Most equipment are complex systems (a truck has more than 15,000 components, an aircraft has 4.5 million components)

  3. CONSEQUENCE OF FAILURE • Failure of equipment results in reduction in availability • This in turn results in loss of revenue • Aircraft (747): 1 million dollars per day • Other indirect costs: Delays to production, Loss of good will, Dissatisfied customers etc

  4. EQUIPMENT FAILURE • Equipment failures depend on inherent reliability which is determined by the decisions made during design and manufacture • Equipment degrade with age and usage • The rate of degradation depends on usage intensity, operating environment, and maintenance actions

  5. RELIABILITY THEORY • Reliability theory deals with the study of equipment degradation and failures • It includes Reliability Science, Reliability Engineering, Reliability Management and Reliability Mathematics • Maintenance is also part of reliability theory – needed for coping with unreliability

  6. MAINTENANCE • Maintenance are actions (or activities) needed to (i) control equipment degradation and failures and (ii) to restore a failed equipment to operational state. • The former is termed Preventive Maintenance (PM) and the latter as Corrective Maintenance (CM)

  7. APPROACHES TO MAINTENANCE • Changed significantly over the last fifty years. • Pre 1950: Maintenance was regarded simply as an unavoidable cost • Post 1950: Scientific approach to maintenance (mainly OR models - dealing with operational and economic issues)

  8. APPROACHES TO MAINTENANCE • Post 1970: Maintenance management - Integral to business performance - Part of strategic management - More integrated and pro-active approach - Many approaches (e.g., TPM, RCM, Tero-technology, ILS) have evolved

  9. IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY • Systems are getting more complex • Maintenance requires specialist skills and equipment • It is not often not economical for businesses to carry out in-house maintenance. • Out-sourcing of maintenance is an option

  10. IMPLICATIONS • Maintenance needs to be managed from an overall business viewpoint • Several options 1.Own and maintain equipment 2. Own but out-source maintenance (Service contract) 3.Lease of equipment (Lease contract)

  11. Strategic Maintenance Management

  12. STRATEGIC MAINTENANCE

  13. CHALLENGE • Need to model the different elements (technical, commercial, operational) • Need to understand the underlying degradation processes involved (Reliability science) • Adequate data to build and validate models

  14. CASE: DRAGLINE

  15. CASE: DRAGLINE • Cost: 100 million dollars • Moving surface dirt to expose coal in open cut mining • Runs 24 hours per day and 365 days per year • Revenue loss of 1 million dollar for every day out of action

  16. CASE: DRAGLINE • Commercial considerations dictate an increase in output • Idea: Increase bucket size (100 tons to 140?) • Greater load on components • Implications for reliability and maintenance

  17. LOAD DEGRADATION DUTY CYCLE MAINTENANCE FAILURE AVAILABILITY YIELD

  18. MODELLING • Modelling system in terms of its major components [Decomposition] • Modelling degradation of each component • Modelling effect of bucket load on component and system performance • Involves reliability science, engineering and mathematics

  19. SYSTEM DECOMPOSITION • Hierarchy: Systems, sub-systems, assemblies, sub-assemblies and so on down to part and material level • Complexity versus tractability • Data available determines the appropriate level to model -- Need adequate data for model building

  20. SYSTEM DECOMPOSITION • The dragline was decomposed into 7 major systems • Some of them were further sub-divided resulting in 25 components • Decision influenced by the data available for modelling

  21. SYSTEM DECOMPOSITION

  22. MODELLING • Component Failures • System Failures • Effect of Load on Failures • Maintenance Actions • Availability • Yield

  23. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE • Three 8-hour shifts per day • Minor PM: 8 hour duration after 20 shifts of operation (once every 3 weeks) • Major PM: Shutdown PM (6 weeks) every 5 years. Cost 50 million dollars and system as good as new after a shutdown PM

  24. Cycle Minor Failures Failure Rate r(x)  Shutdown PM Time (usage clock) 

  25. 1 Bucket load V1 0.95 Bucket load V0 Reliability T1 T0 P.M. Interval (T)

  26. COMPONENT FAILURES • Black box approach • Weibull Distribution • Two parameter Weibull distribution • Scale () and shape () parameters • Effect of bucket load (Accelerated Life) • No effect on shape parameter • Scale parameter is affected

  27. EFFECT OF LOAD • V0 - Base dragline load (bucket + rigging + dirt) • V - Dragline load • Linking failure distribution to load (ATF Model)

  28. FAILURE DATA • Taken from FMMS maintenance database • From end of Major (shutdown) PM in March/April 1996 to operations till July 1998 • Estimation of parameters using maximum likelihood method and least squares method

  29. DRAG GENERATOR

  30. YIELD vs BUCKET LOAD

  31. SENSITIVITY STUDY ()

  32. CONCLUSIONS • Study revealed increase in output yield with increase in bucket size • Maximum yield corresponds to v  1.3 (dragline load = 182 tonnes or payload of 116 tonnes) as opposed to current payload of 74 tonnes • Shutdown interval will need to be reduced from 43680 usage hours (5 years) to 25000 usage hours (3 years)

  33. CASE: RAIL TRACK • Increase in traffic (goods and passenger) • How to cope? Several options -- More frequent operations; More wagons; Greater axle load; Faster speeds etc • Implications: More load on the track and faster degradation • What should be the optimal strategy?

  34. CASE: RAIL TRACK • Need to integrate operation (commercial decision) with maintenance (technical decision) • Increase load? Short term gain but long term loss! • Upgrade track? Costly • Design better rolling stock?

  35. OTHER CASES • Networks: Water pipe, Gas pipe, Oil pipe, Road • Power plant: Overload to meet increased demand • Manufacturing: Higher production rate to meet increased demand

  36. Out-Sourcing of Maintenance

  37. IMPORTANT FEATURES • Two different parties - Agent (providing the maintenance service) - Customer (owner of the system and recipient of the maintenance service) • Different objectives or goals • Decision problems for both parties

  38. OUT-SOURCING

  39. GAME THEORETIC APPROACH • Agent offers several options (A1, A2, ..Ak) • The customer chooses the optimal option • The parameters (decision variables) of each option to be selected optimally by the service agent • The service agent needs to take into account the optimal response of customer

  40. SERVICE AGENT PERSPECTIVE • Structure (terms and pricing of contract) • Effect of equipment age, usage intensity and operating environment • Customers differing in their attitude to risk • Owner not operating as per contract • Dispute resolution

  41. OWNER PERSPECTIVE • Choosing the best option • Uncertainty about service agent’s capability • Service agent not executing tasks as per contract • Dispute resolution

  42. OUT-SOURCING • Can be viewed as a Principal-Agent problem • Owner (Principal) and Maintenance service provider (Agent) • Raises several new issues (see next slide) • Scope for lot of new research

  43. PRINCIPAL-AGENT PROBLEM

  44. Maintenance of Leased Equipment

  45. REASONS FOR LEASING • The rapid technological changes makes equipment obsolete in a short period. • Also the cost of owning and maintaining an equipment is increasing due to increased sophistication with each new generation. • Hence, leasing is a better option.

  46. TERMINOLOGY • Lessor: Owns and leases the equipment • Lessee: Leases the equipment for a specified period (L) • Equipment: Unreliable and prone to failure over the lease period • Contract: Which defines the conditions for lease

  47. EQUIPMENT LESSOR LESSEE CONTRACT MAIN ELEMENTS

  48. AN IMPORTANT FEATURE The advantage of leasing is that the lessor provides the maintenance. As such, the equipment (a physical item) is bundled with maintenance (a service) and offered as a package to the lessee. This raises several new issues for both the lessor and the lessee.

  49. LEASE CONTRACT • There are three main issues in a lease contract. • Issue 1: This deals with the contract terms and conditions -- the period of the lease, the performance requirements that the leased equipment should meet and the actions and the obligations of each party (lessor and lessee).