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Disaggregate to Appreciate

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Disaggregate to Appreciate

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  1. 2012 TAIR Conference Corpus Christi, TX Disaggregate to Appreciate Making SENSE of Texas’ Entering Community College Students

  2. Center for Community College Student Engagement • Research and service center at The University of Texas at Austin, Community College Leadership Program • Currently serve 826 community and technical colleges across the United States, Canada, Bermuda, Nova Scotia, the Northern Marianas, and the Marshall Islands • Provide national and college-level data on student engagement (approx. 1.7 million respondents), faculty engagement, and promising high-impact institutional practices

  3. Center for Community College Student Engagement • Survey of Entering Student Engagement (SENSE); • administered during the fall term, 4th and 5th weeks of class • gathers information on entering students’ earliest experiences at the college from the time they decide to enroll through their first three weeks in class Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (CCFSSE) Community College Institutional Survey (CCIS)

  4. Making SENSE of Entering Community College Students What are entering community college students saying about their experiences three weeks in? Are all student subgroups saying the same thing? How do we know? What are the implications for institutional policy and practice?

  5. Goals of disaggregation Demonstrate how breaking data down into subgroups yields more in depth information than just relying on benchmark scores to paint a picture Show and discuss how student characteristics intersect with institutional policies and practices

  6. Benchmarks: Effective Practice with Entering Students Early Connections Academic and Social Support Network Clear Academic Plan and Pathway SENSE Benchmarks: groupings of conceptually related items High Expectations and Aspirations Effective Track to College Readiness Engaged Learning

  7. Effective Practice with Entering Students The first time I came to the college I felt welcome (Early Connections) An advisor helped me to set academic goals and to create a plan for achieving them (Clear Academic Plan and Pathway) All instructors clearly explained course grading policies (Academic and Social Support Network) Item-level data Iam prepared academically to succeed in college (High Expectations and Aspirations) Before I could register for classes I was required to take a placement test (Effective Track to College Readiness) Discuss an assignment or grade with an instructor (Engaged Learning)

  8. A Closer Look Less Than Full-time & Full-time Traditional Aged & Non-Traditional Aged Male & Female Dissect the data for a clearer picture First-Generation & Not First-Generation Developmental & Non-Developmental

  9. A Closer Look Less Than Full-time & Full-time Traditional Aged & Non-Traditional Aged Male & Female Dissect the data for a clearer picture First-Generation & Not First-Generation Developmental & Non-Developmental

  10. Student Profile: A Look at Texas Students

  11. Texas vs. the Cohort: Enrollment Status Compared to the SENSE Cohort, more Texas students are enrolled less than full-time Source: 2010 SENSECohort

  12. Texas vs. the Cohort: Race/Ethnicity Compared to the SENSE Cohort, more Texas students are Hispanic Source: 2010 SENSECohort

  13. Texas vs. the Cohort: Developmental Education Of Texas’ Developmental students: • 50% are in one type • 32% are in two types • 18% are in three types Math is the most common type of Developmental course in which entering students are enrolled • 82% of Texas students • 77% of Cohort Source: 2010 SENSECohort

  14. Data Digging:A Closer Look at a Student Subgroup

  15. Disaggregation Example: Developmental vs. Non-Developmental • Statistically significant and interesting results on survey items from Texas respondents • Alpha level of 0.001 • Cohen’s D effect size of 0.20 or greater • Ability for SENSE colleges to run similar breakouts via the SENSE online reporting system or using their raw data file

  16. Developmental vs. Non-Developmental: Goals for Attending College More students enrolled in Developmental courses have the goal of obtaining an associate degree or certificate More students notenrolled in Developmental courses have the goal of transferring to a 4-year Source: 2010 SENSECohort

  17. Goal Setting and Academic Planning With differing goals between subgroups of entering students, how do colleges ensure students are starting off on the right track with goal setting and academic planning? Academic advising is key to student success.

  18. Academic Advising Video Removed

  19. Developmental / Non-Developmental: Academic Advising Fewer Developmental students report knowing about academic advising compared to Non-Developmental students. However, Developmental and Non-Developmental students report the same on useof academic advising. Only 53% use academic planning/advising services Source: 2010 SENSECohort

  20. Developmental / Non-Developmental: Academic Advising Academic advising for entering students not enrolled in developmental coursework who plan to transfer to a 4-year institution Academic advising for entering students enrolled in developmental coursework who seek to earn a credential vs. Should these conversations be the same?

  21. Implications for Institutional Policy and Practice Is your college setting priorities that align with the needs of your entering students? Consider Academic Advising… • Is it required for all entering students? • Are goal setting and planning a part of the conversation? • Do all advisors talk with students about outside commitments and how those commitments may impact the number of classes the student can successfully complete in the given term?

  22. Developmental vs. Non-Developmental: Orientation and The First Class Day Developmental and Non-Developmental students in Texas are similar on: • Participating in orientation before classes (49%) • Agreeing that all instructors clearly explained course syllabi (91%) Source: 2010 SENSECohort

  23. Developmental vs. Non-Developmental: First Three Weeks of Class • After just three weeks of class, many students report coming to class without completing readings or assignments. • But, fewer developmental students report doing so. Source: 2010 SENSECohort

  24. Implications for Institutional Policy and Practice Is your college setting priorities that align with the needs of your entering students? Consider Coming to Class Unprepared… • Does the college provide guidelines to all instructors on what policies should be outlined in their syllabi? • Are class attendance policies clearly stated in each instructor’s syllabi? • Do students understand the consequences for choosing to attend class unprepared or choosing to skip class? • Are student- and instructor-initiated drop policies clearly explained to all students and instructors?

  25. Developmental vs. Non-Developmental: Knowledge and Use of Skills Labs More Developmental students report knowing about skills labs and use them more often Source: 2010 SENSECohort

  26. Developmental vs. Non-Developmental: Knowledge and Use of Computer Labs More developmental students report using computer labs. Source: 2010 SENSECohort

  27. Implications for Institutional Policy and Practice Is your college setting priorities that align with the needs of your entering students? Consider Use of Skills and Computer Labs... • Are they built into the course? • Are labs open and available to all students? • Are all students consistently encouraged to use these services, or is only a targeted group of students encouraged?

  28. Your College’s SENSE Data Looking at your college’s data using this same method of disaggregation could help inform other aspects of the students’ experiences during the first three weeks in college. This is how you do it…

  29. SENSE Institutional Reports:Custom Reporting

  30. SENSE Online Reporting System www.ccsse.org/sense/members/archive.cfm

  31. Using your SENSE Data File: Further Analysis

  32. SENSE Data File When do you get it? Provided via online reporting system when results are released What’s in it? The data file contains responses from all students at the college who completed SENSE, with the exception of invalid surveys and those completed by students under the age of 18. What is NOT in it? Texas state law prohibits the sharing of student identifiers via the web; therefore, the data file accessible via the online reporting system does NOT include student IDs. Why would I want to have student IDs?

  33. Student Identifiers—Make Request Having students IDs in the data file will enable the college to match engagement data to outcome data by respondent—a key element of tracking the link between students’ engagement behaviors and institutional policies and practices. The goal is not to track an individual student but rather to track a subgroup of students (e.g., engagement levels and learning outcomes of developmental students). Contact your SENSE Liaison to request your SENSE data file with student IDs.

  34. Using the Raw Data File • Using Statistical Software • Using Excel

  35. Making SENSE of Your College’s Entering Community College Students Dig deep. What are your college’s entering students saying about their earliest experiences? Challenge your assumptions.

  36. Contact Information: April Juárez Program Coordinator, Student Success BY THE NUMBERS Initiative 512-232-3744 juarez@ccsse.org Janelle Guillory Research Associate 512-232-6453 guillory@cccse.org