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Implementing SNAP-Ed 2.0: Translating Obesity Prevention Research into Practice

Implementing SNAP-Ed 2.0: Translating Obesity Prevention Research into Practice

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Implementing SNAP-Ed 2.0: Translating Obesity Prevention Research into Practice

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  1. Implementing SNAP-Ed 2.0: Translating Obesity Prevention Research into Practice Andy Riesenberg, MSPH Food Security and Obesity Prevention Team Leader Food And Nutrition Service – Western Regional Office

  2. Purpose SNAP-Ed 2.0. Evidence-based programs for nutrition education and obesity prevention. Regional examples. Evaluation outcomes.

  3. SNAP-Ed 2.0

  4. Key Elements

  5. Evidence-Based Programs

  6. Childhood Obesity Prevention Programs: Comparative Effectiveness Source: Childhood Obesity Prevention Programs: Comparative Effectiveness Review and Meta-Analysis, June 2013. Available at www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/child-obesity-prevention.cfm.

  7. Discussion Question What is the difference between evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence? Why are both important?

  8. Socio-Ecological Model

  9. Source: Institute of Medicine

  10. Ten Essential Public Health Services

  11. Implementing Environmental Approach

  12. WRO Public Health Strategies

  13. WRO Public Health Strategies

  14. Public Health Strategies

  15. Opportunities:Public Health Partnerships

  16. SWRO Examples: Richard Burley • Multi-Level: Active Life • Collaboration: SAFB • Evidence based: UNM, Chili Plus • Innovation: OSU, Farm To you

  17. MPRO Examples: Star Morrison Community Based Strategies (INEP) Community Based Social Marketing (“Pick a better snack”) Community Partnerships (School Health Wellness Coalitions, Family Gardening, Two-Buck Lunch) Public Health Programs Intergenerational Poverty Task Force

  18. SERO Examples: Veronica Bryant School Health and Wellness Committees Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care (NAP SACC) Cooking Matters – retail grocery stores Farmer’s Markets’ – marketing campaigns Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) – nutrition education and BMI measurements

  19. Influencing, but Not Implementing Environmental Changes Retail Stores (Example) Allowable Costs Point-of-purchase marketing In-store nutrition displays Recipe cards/leave-behinds NERI Cooking demos/taste tests Store tours Technical assistance to retailers Unallowable costs • Refrigeration units • Beautification/Upkeep • Painting • Shelving • Flooring • Televisions • Manufacturers coupons • Retailer incentives

  20. Non-allowable Policy Activities

  21. Discussion Question # 2 What is an appropriate balance between nutrition education and environmental supports?

  22. Turning Reach into Impact

  23. WRO SNAP-Ed Evaluation Outcomes Framework

  24. SNAP-Ed Evaluation Questions

  25. Evaluation Framework Logic Model

  26. Discussion Question # 3 What does success in SNAP-Ed look like? How should we measure it?

  27. Wrap-up SNAP-Ed 2.0 emphasizes nutrition education and obesity prevention and offers more flexibility for targeting and programming. SNAP-Ed activities must be grounded in the best available evidence for preventing overweight and obesity in the low-income population. Outcomes should demonstrate behavioral changes for SNAP-Ed audiences. FNS is here to help.

  28. Q&A THANK YOU Andrew, Star, Richard, Veronica, and… Nancy, Martha, Sally