Download
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Pores PowerPoint Presentation

Pores

138 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Pores

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. “Volcano Eruptions” from Electromigration G. S. Cargill III, Lehigh Univ., and A. M. Maniatty, RPI – MET DMR-0312189 Pores Electromigration is atom movement caused by flow of an electrical current, a reliability problem in metal conductor lines of integrated circuits since the 1960's. Atoms moving with the electron flow cause voids and swelling (hillocks). Anode End Cathode End Cathode Voids Hillocks We have discovered and analyzed another, unusual mode of electromigration damage in copper conductor lines, causing failure by volcano-like eruptions of molten copper in some cases, as shown, and reversible near-failure / recovery phenomena, involving local melting and resolidification in other cases. Volcano Eruption

  2. “Volcano Eruptions” from Electromigration G. S. Cargill III, Lehigh Univ., and A. M. Maniatty, RPI – MET DMR-0312189 Broader Impacts: Simulation work has been carried out at Rensselaer by graduate students Chia-Ju Yang and Linda Ge. Dr. Yang finished his PhD in August 2004 and is currently employed at CCI America, Inc. Nicole Bieber, a high school student, visited Maniatty’s group in Summer 2005. Top, Linda Ge and Dr. Maniatty. Bottom, Chia-Ju Yang and Nicole Bieber. Dr. Cargill (far right) with Lehigh University students (from left) Hongquing Zhang, Jen Deng, Laura Moyer, and Gan Wang. Experiments were carried out by Lehigh graduate students Hongqing Zhang and Gan Wang, who presented papers at the Spring MRS meeting. Laura Moyer completed her PhD and is now employed by Alcoa Inc. During summer and fall 2006, Mr. Zhang has gained industrial research experience as an intern at the IBM Watson Research Center. Jen Deng continued as a part-time undergraduate work study student. During summer 2006, two other undergraduate students, Kylan McQuaig and Tom Nizolek, and a graduate student visitor from Japan, Toshikazu Irisawa, also worked in our research group.