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Analysis the Behaviour of Concrete by Partial Replacement of Cement by Rice Husk Ash and Fly Ash PowerPoint Presentation
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Analysis the Behaviour of Concrete by Partial Replacement of Cement by Rice Husk Ash and Fly Ash

Analysis the Behaviour of Concrete by Partial Replacement of Cement by Rice Husk Ash and Fly Ash

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Analysis the Behaviour of Concrete by Partial Replacement of Cement by Rice Husk Ash and Fly Ash

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  1. International Journal of Trend in Scientific Research and Development (IJTSRD) Volume 3 Issue 5, August 2019 Available Online: www.ijtsrd.com e-ISSN: 2456 – 6470 Analysis the Behaviour of Concrete by Partial Replacement of Cement by Rice Husk Ash and Fly Ash Sandeep Tak1, Rajdeep Singh2, Ashish Verma2 1Student, 2Assistant Professor 1,2BRCM College of Engineering and Technology, Bahal, Bhiwani, Haryana, India How to cite this paper: Sandeep Tak | Rajdeep Singh | Ashish Verma "Analysis the Behaviour of Concrete by Partial Replacement of Cement by Rice Husk Ash and Fly Ash" Published in International Journal of Trend in Scientific Research and Development (ijtsrd), ISSN: 2456- 6470, Volume-3 | Issue-5, August 2019, https://doi.org/10.31142/ijtsrd25302 Copyright © 2019 by author(s) and International Journal of Trend in Scientific Research and Development Journal. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by /4.0) Second, the principal binder of concrete is actually Portland cement, the generation of that is actually a significant contributor to greenhouse 1gas emissions which are actually implicated in climatic change as well as climate change. Thirdly, a number of concrete structures suffer with lack of durability which might consume the natural resources. And so, obtaining an answer to substitute an useful recycled merchandise for part of the cement appears to be appealing for renewable Concrete it's essentially a blend of 2 components: Aggregates and Paste (or maybe binder). The paste comprises cement, additional cementing or perhaps additional cementitious substances &water. It binds the aggregates (sand and crushed stone) or maybe stones right into a rock like mass. The objective is actually filling up the voids and come with a strong and dense components. The good aggregates fill up the voids created by the coarse aggregates; and cement fills up the voids of the fine aggregates. Cheaper the voids more could be the strength of concrete. The chemical response of the cementitious substances &water, is actually known as hydration. It's the task by that paste hardens as well as binds the aggregates. The excessive modulus of rigidity as well as elasticity of concrete compared to various other road making items offers a concrete pavement with a good amount of flexural or maybe beam strength. This particular property results to a broader distribution of externally used wheel loads. This in turn limits the pressures put on to the sub grade. The main ABSTRACT Rice Husk Ash (RHA) is actually a byproduct of the industry specially agricultural that contains higher quantity of silicon dioxide (SiO2). With this analysis, for the very first time of the Middle East, in order to supply regular RHA, a specific furnace was designed as well as constructed. Afterwards, Efforts were made to figure out the optimum temperature as well as time period of burning up. Results indicate that temperature of 6500 centigrade as well as sixty minutes burning period are actually the very best combination. Subsequently different experiments had been carried away to establish attributes of concretes integrating the best possible RHA. These tests include compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, modules of elasticity, fast chloride as well as water permeability permeability check. Results indicate that concrete including RHA had greater compressive strength, splitting tensile strength as well as modulus of elasticity from different ages in contrast to that of the management concrete. Additionally, results indicate which RHA as an artificial pozzolanic content has improved the durability of RHA concretes as well as reduced the chloride diffusion. INTRODUCTION The utilization of agricultural and industrial waste components are required by renewable development of concrete industry and the cement. With current, for a wide range of motives, the concrete structure industry isn't lasting. First of all, enormous numbers of virgin components which could stay for coming decades are consumed by it. IJTSRD25302 pp.434-437, BY 4.0) component of the ton carrying capability of a concrete pavement is as a result supplied by the concrete coating on it's own. The thickness of its is largely based on 1the flexural 1strength of the concrete and by the magnitude of the wheel or maybe axle a lot. Sub-bases don't make a major structural contribution to Concrete. EXPERIMENTAL WORK COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH General In most structural applications, concrete is employed primarily to resist compressive stresses. When a plain concrete member is subjected to compression, the failure of the member takes place, in its vertical plane along the diagonal. The vertical crack occurs due to lateral tensile strains. A flow in the concrete, which is in the form of micro crack along the vertical axis of the member will take place on the application of axial compression load and propagate further due to the lateral tensile strains. Test Procedure and Results Test specimens of size 150mm x 150mm x 150mm were prepared for testing the compressive strength. In this study, the mix was done manually. The cement and fine aggregate were first mixed dry to uniform colour and then coarse aggregate was added and mixed with the mixture of cement and fine aggregates. Water was then added and the whole mass mixed. The interior surface of the moulds and the base @ IJTSRD | Unique Paper ID – IJTSRD25302 | Volume – 3 | Issue – 5 | July - August 2019 Page 434

  2. International Journal of Trend in Scientific Research and Development (IJTSRD) @ www.ijtsrd.com eISSN: 2456-6470 plate were highly oiled before concrete was placed. After this the specimens were removed from the moulds and placed in clean fresh water at for 28 days curing. For testing in compression, no cushioning material was placed between Table 4.1 Compressive strength of 4.5 MPa flexure design (w/c = 0.4) 7days Load (KN)Average (KN)fc (MPa)Load (KN)Average (KN)fc (MPa) 863.7 889.9 825.6 809.9 861.4 873.6 791.7 729.2 799.1 638.1 660.8 672.3 496.3 541.6 488.1 477.8 432.8 411.2 347.7 371.4 384.6 10% F.A 10%R.H.A. (FR11) 499.1 20% F.A. 10% R.H.A (FR21) 371.1 10% F.A 20% R.H.A. (FR12) 376.3 the specimen and the plates of the machine. The load was applied axially without shock till the specimen was crushed. Test results of compressive strength test at the age of 28 days 28days w/c = 0.4 1170 1246 1027 1132 1075 1097 1034 1058 956.3 926.5 931.9 950 731.8 713 758.3 621.2 655.9 661.3 560.1 549.7 617.9 689.6 765.7 728.5 563.8 657.3 639.8 596.2 572.3 579.2 Controlled (FR00) 859.73 38.21 1147.66 51.01 10% F.A. (FR10) 848.33 37.70 1101.33 48.94 20% F.A. (FR20) 773.333 34.3703 1016.1 45.16 30% F.A. (FR30) 657.066 29.2029 936.133 41.6059 10% R.H.A. (FR01) 508.67 22.60 734.36 32.63 20% R.H.A (FR02) 440.6 19.5822 646.133 28.7170 30% R.H.A. (FR03) 367.9 16.3511 575.9 25.5955 468.7 450.9 472.9 21.0177 727.933 32.3525 357.2 381.3 369.87 16.43 620.3 27.5688 343.6 358.1 359.33 15.97 582.56 25.89 Table 4.2 Compressive strength of 5.0 MPa flexure design (W/C = 0.35) 7days Load (KN) Average (KN) fc (MPa) Load (KN) Average (KN) fc (MPa) 907.2 980.5 873.8 822.5 851.9 878.4 760.7 788.9 825.4 767.4 730.2 705.8 563.1 552.1 516.4 468.4 482.8 509.3 450.3 469.2 387.1 28days W/C=0.35 1246 1289 1304 1058 1221 1081 1056 1108 1086 1051 976.7 862.2 737.1 762.8 775.8 687.3 699.3 751.3 630.1 610.4 572 Controlled (FROO) 920.5 40.911 1279.66 56.874 10% F.A. (FR10) 850.933 37.819 1120 49.78 20% F.A. (FR20) 791.666 35.185 1083.33 48.148 30% F.A. (FR30) 734.466 32.642 963.3 42.813 10% R.H.A. (FR01) 543.86 24.17 758.56 33.71 20% R.H.A. (FR02) 486.833 21.637 712.633 31.672 30% R.H.A. (FR03) 435.533 19.357 604.166 26.851 @ IJTSRD | Unique Paper ID – IJTSRD25302 | Volume – 3 | Issue – 5 | July - August 2019 Page 435

  3. International Journal of Trend in Scientific Research and Development (IJTSRD) @ www.ijtsrd.com eISSN: 2456-6470 10% F.A 10%R.H.A. (FR11) 20% F.A. 10% R.H.A (FR21) 10% F.A 20% R.H.A. (FR12) 521.3 511.6 580.4 456.2 453 501.2 387.3 403.1 443.3 801 813.6 745.3 754.2 699.3 721 696.1 686.3 674.1 537.766 23.900 786.633 34.961 470.133 20.8948 724.833 32.214 411.233 18.277 685.5 30.47 Table 4.3 Compressive strength OF 5.5 MPa flexure design (W/C = 0.3) 7days Load (KN)Average (KN)fc (MPa)Load (KN)Average (KN)fc (MPa) 1053 1069 1021 963.1 988.2 912 1027 1009 963.4 748.1 766.5 700.1 644.4 569.3 591.3 542.4 506 531.8 513.5 476.8 450.3 10% F.A 10%R.H.A. (FR11) 693.3 20% F.A. 10% R.H.A (FR21) 601.1 10% F.A 20% R.H.A. (FR12) 487 28days W/C = 0.3 1380 1416 1368 1349 1037 1212 1208 1143 1230 1017 967.2 1135 1024 986.4 796.6 744.9 701.5 730.7 588.7 593.4 647.3 1021 1014 981.8 873. 893. 909. 836.4 800.2 792.5 Controlled (FR00) 1047.66 46.5629 1388 61.6888 10% F.A. (FR10) 954.433 42.4192 1199.33 53.3037 20% F.A. (FR20) 999.8 44.4355 1193.66 53.0518 30% F.A. (FR30) 738.233 32.8103 1039.73 46.2103 10% R.H.A. (FR01) 601.67 26.74 995.67 44.25 20% R.H.A. (FR02) 526.73 23.61 725.7 32.2533 30% R.H.A. (FR03) 480.2 21.3422 609.8 27.1022 664.9 700.3 686.166 30.4963 1005.6 44.6933 563.6 589.5 584.733 25.9881 892.16 39.6518 511.1 503.7 500.6 22.2488 809.7 35.98 @ IJTSRD | Unique Paper ID – IJTSRD25302 | Volume – 3 | Issue – 5 | July - August 2019 Page 436

  4. International Journal of Trend in Scientific Research and Development (IJTSRD) @ www.ijtsrd.com eISSN: 2456-6470 Fig 4.1 28-day compressive strengths for all water cement ratios REFERENCES [1]Atiş, C. D., Kilic, A., &Sevim, U. K. (2004) "Strength and shrinkage properties of mortar containing a nonstandard high-calcium fly ash". Cementand Concrete Research, 34(1), 99-102. [9]Demirboğa, R., Türkmen, İ., & Burhan Karakoç, M. (2007) "Thermo-mechanical properties of concrete containing high-volume mineral admixtures", Building and Environment, 42(1), 49- 354. [10]Ellis, WE Jr, Rigs, E.H., Butler, W.B. (1991)"Comparative results of utilization of fly ash, silica fume and GGBS in reducing the chloride permeability of concrete". In: Proceedings of the 2nd CANMET/ACI International Conference on Durability of Concrete, Montreal, Canada. ACI SP 126(1), 443–457 [2]Brown, J.H. (1982) "The strength and workability of concrete with PFA substitution", In: Proceedings International Symposium on the Use of PFA in Concrete, pp. 151–161. [3]Bui, D. D., Hu, J., & Stroeven, P. (2005) "Particle size effect on the strength of rice husk ash blended gap- graded Portland cement concrete", Cement and Concrete Composites, 27(3), 357- 366. [11]Ganesan, K., Rajagopal, K., &Thangavel, K. (2008) "Rice husk ash blended cement: assessment of optimal level of replacement for strength and permeability properties of concrete", Construction and Building Materials, 22(8), 1675-1683. Gebler, S. H., &Klieger, P. (1983) "Effect offly ash on the air-void stability of concrete (No. RD085. 01T)", PortlandCement Association. [4]Bui, D.D., Hu, J. and Stroeven, P. (2005) “Particle Size Effect On The Strength Of Rice Husk Ash Blended Gap- Graded Portland Cement Concrete”, Cement & Concrete Composites 27, pp357– 366. [5]Carette, "Characterization of Canadian fly ashes and their performance in concrete", Division Report, MRP/MSL, 84-137. G. G., &Malhotra, V. M. (1984) [12]Givi, A.N., Rashid, S.A., Aziz, F.N.A. and Salleh, M.A.M. (2010) “Assessment of the effects of rice husk ash particle size on strength, water permeability and workability of binary blended concrete”, Construction and Building Materials 24 pp. 2145–2150. [6]Chalee, Siripanichgorn, A., &Jaturapitakkul, C. (2007)"Effect of W/C ratio on covering depth of fly ash concrete in marine environment", Construction and Building Materials, 21(5), 965-971. W., Teekavanit, M., Kiattikomol, K., [13]Habeeb, G.A. and Mahmud, H.B. (2010) “Study on Properties of Rice Husk Ash and Its Use as Cement Replacement Material”, Materials Research 13 pp. 185- 190. [7]Compton, F. R., &Macinnis, C. (1952)"Field trial of fly ash concrete", Ontario Hydro Research News, 18-21. [14]Haque, M.N., Langan, B.W., Ward, M.A. (1988) "High fly ash concretes. ACI Mater.8(1), 54–60 [8]Della, V. P., Kühn, I., &Hotza, D. (2002)"Rice husk ash as an alternate source for active silica production", Materials Letters, 57(4), 818-821. [15]Ho, D. W. S., & Lewis, R. K. (1983)", Carbonation of concrete incorporating fly ash or a chemical admixture. ACI Special Publication, 79. @ IJTSRD | Unique Paper ID – IJTSRD25302 | Volume – 3 | Issue – 5 | July - August 2019 Page 437