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  1. YOUR TITLE GOES HERE Date: Author: Advisor: Acknowledgements Capstone Talk PHYS 4300

  2. Outline • Motivation • Background • e.g. Maxwell’s Equations • e.g. Relativistic Corrections • Viewgraph Formatting • Power Point Tricks • Backgrounds, and Font, Size, Color, & Style • Bulleted/enumerated lists and hierarchy • Images, Graphs, Schematics, and Cartoons • The Perfect Viewgraph • Conclusions • Appendix: Prof. John Wilkin’s Rules for Physics Talks

  3. Motivation Make it simple and interesting -lose them here and they are gone for good. • General Motivation • save the known world • Specific • Graphics are important here

  4. Background Know your audience! use this to get them up to speed. • Maxwell’s Equations • Use equation editor for simple equation or import as objects from pdf etc. or cut and paste using <Print Screen> • Relativistic Corrections

  5. Viewgraph Formatting • Font: • Size - depends on room • Color - depends on background • Style - font, italics, bold, shadow,underlineetc. • Backgrounds – keep them simple • Bulleted/enumerated lists and hierarchy • Images, Graphs, Schematics, and Cartoons • The Perfect Viewgraph

  6. Background 1: Good

  7. Background 2: Bad

  8. Background 2: Ugly

  9. Viewgraph Formatting: Font Size • Depends on room and on font Can you read me now? (36) Can you read me now? (32) Can you read me now? (28) Can you read me now? (24) Can you read me now? (20) Can you read me now? (18) Can you read me now? (16) Can you read me now? (14) Can you read me now? (12) Can you read me now? (10)

  10. Colors Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Can you read me Now? Readability depends heavily on the actual output device used.

  11. ON VIEWGRAPH FONTS[TNR 40] Tools for Clarity [TNR 28] • Hierarchy is crucial. [TNR 24] • Group ideas logically, but be consistent. [TNR 20] • This adds needed order to a viewgraph. [TNR 16] • But too much “hierarchy” is confusing. [TNR 14] • For example, can youread this? [TNR 14, 12, 10] • Colour too is useful. [TNR 24] • Be consistent within and between viewgraphs. [TNR 20] • But to not be frivolous. [TNR 16] • Over use of colour is distracting. [TNR 14] • And somecolours really do notwork well. [TNR 14] • Other tricks include distinctive fonts and highlighting. [TNR 24] • Italics,bold,underlined, shadow and combinations? Be consistent [TNR 20] • And do not over use. [TNR 16] For this can be very distracting [Arial16], To say the least [Alg..D 16] Too muchof thisis bad.

  12. ON VIEWGRAPH FONTS[TNR 40] Tools for Clarity [TNR 28] • Hierarchy is crucial. [TNR 24] • Group ideas logically, but be consistent. [TNR 20] • This adds needed order to a viewgraph. [TNR 16] • But too much “hierarchy” is confusing. [TNR 14] • For example, can youread this? [TNR 14, 12, 10] • Colour too is useful. [TNR 24] • Be consistent within and between viewgraphs. [TNR 20] • But to not be frivolous. [TNR 16] • Over use of colour is distracting. [TNR 14] • And somecolours really do notwork well. [TNR 14] • Other tricks include distinctive fonts and highlighting. [TNR 24] • Italics,bold,underlined, shadow and combinations? Be consistent [TNR 20] • And do not over use. [TNR 16] For this can be very distracting [Arial16], To say the least [Alg..D 16] Too muchof thisis bad.

  13. Demonstration PowerPoint • Use the predefined blank.pot • Bulleted items are formatted correctly • you must use the Title and Text layout to get this bullet layout • Addition bulleted text boxes should be a copy of this • Go no deeper than this (and this is too deep) • Keep text above 16 points (18 preferred) if you want the audience to be able to read the text • Group graphical objects together as it makes it easier to modify the layout • Use multiple groupings • text and arrow • text and scale bar • Etc. • Then group the groups to have a composite drawing • Name your PowerPoint Well: DescriptiveTitle-YearMonthDate.ppt • i.e. DemonstrationPowerPoint-20050610.ppt

  14. Power Point Tricks • Use Master Page – it does save time! • I like Font size to be defined by me, and the text box to fit around it. • <Right Click> <Format Place Holder..> <Text Box> <Resize Autoshape ..> • Tricks to minimize white space. • Use “<View> <Ruler>” to minimize bullet-text separation • Use “<Format> <Line Spacing> - minimum settings of 0.85 line and 0.15 before/after works. • Maximize figure size. <Copy> <Paste Special, as Picture png> Very useful. • If bulleted item is > 2 lines you are probably being too verbose. • For graphs, when you create the plots using whatever software package, use sensible colors (e.g. Bl R G B, and stay consistent!), thick enough lines, and large enough fonts. • Fonts: be sensible Arial is clean and Times New Roman dense. • Graphics need a title and caption! • Stealing graphics on the web: <Print Screen>, <Paste> and crop! But you must cite – best cite below the figure.

  15. H  He He  C C  Ne Ne  O, Mg O  Si Si  Fe Death of a Star • Nuclear fusion in star’s core • Occurs in phases • Massive stars ( > 8 Msun) burn to Fe peak elements • Fe core collapses • Energetic explosion • Supernova • Remnant is neutron star or black hole

  16. Death of a Star • Nuclear fusion in star’s core • Occurs in phases • Massive stars ( M > 8 Msun) burn to Fe peak elements • Fe core collapses • Energetic explosion • Supernova • Remnant is neutron star or black hole

  17. Aug. 21 — -10 days (before max light) • Again, higher metallicity makes better 6200Å feature • Quality of fit roughly the same for both models

  18. Aug. 21 — -10 days (before max light) • Again, higher metallicity makes better 6200Å feature • Quality of fit roughly the same for both models

  19. Mass Spectrometry • We use Isotopic Mass Spectrometry to detect isotopologues (or isotopomers) in a given gas sample • In Mass Spectrometry, a sample is prepared, injected, and borne via an inert carrier gas (He) through a catalyticoven into an ionization source, where the gas particles are ionized via electron impact • These ions are then accelerated through a high voltage static potential, into a magnetic field, which bends the ions into a circular path by mass • A series of sequential Faraday cup detectors then detect the ionized particles, thus detecting the isotopologues • For our experiment, we used a Thermo ScientificDelta V Isotope Mass Spectrometer, outputting all ion currents into the Isodat Acquisition program

  20. What is Mass Spectrometry? • Mass spectrometry takes an ionized sample and differentially separates it by mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) • Developed by JJ Thompson in 1897 • 1906 Nobel Prize • Three common elements to all modern mass spectrometers • Ionization Source (converts sample particles) • Mass analyzer: Deflects charged particles according to Lorentz Force Law and Newton’s Second Law: (m/z)*a=E+(v x B) • Ion currents detected • Limitation: Some compounds have same mass

  21. What is Mass Spectrometry? Detector Single slit or array Mass Analyzer Sector Magnet (uniform B) • Mass spectrometry (MS) takes an ionized sample and separates it by mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) • e.g. z=1 for singly ionized species, m is mass of ion in atomic mass units AMU. • Brief history • Pioneered by J.J. Thomson in the early 1900s • First “full” MS demonstrated by William Aston (1922 Nobel Prize) • First “modern” MS demonstrated by A.J. Dempster (circa 1920) • Three elements in modern Mass Specs • Ionization Source –ionize gas molecules and accelerates ions • Mass analyzer: Deflects charged particles according to Lorentz Force Law • Detector • Limitation: Some ions have same mass e.g. CO+ (m=12+16=28) AMU and N2+ (M=2*14=28). B Ions deflected in arc radius R Solving for v in (1), inserting into (2) and rearranging, + Ion Source Accelerate through V

  22. What is Mass Spectrometry? Mass Spec. Equ’n Solving for v in (1), inserting into (2), and re-arranging: + Detector Single slit or array Mass Analyzer Sector Magnet (uniform B) B • Mass spectrometry (MS) takes an ionized sample and separates it by mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) • e.g. z=1 for singly ionized species, m is mass of ion in atomic mass units AMU. • Brief history • Pioneered by J.J. Thomson in the early 1900s • First “full” MS demonstrated by William Aston (1922 Nobel Prize) • First “modern” [added sector magnet] MS demonstrated by A.J. Dempster (circa 1920) • Three elements in modern Mass Specs • Ionization Source –ionize gas molecules and accelerates ions • Mass analyzer: Deflects charged particles according to Lorentz Force Law • Detector: Detects ion currents • Limitation: Some ions have same mass • e.g. CO+ (m=12+16=28) AMU and N2+ (M=2*14=28). v Ion Source Accelerate through V • Schematic of Mass Spec. • R of ion trajectories only dependent on (m/z) for given V and B • Typically set V and scan B to scan through (m/z)

  23. SWNT Thin Films • Combine electrical and optical properties • Potential Applications • Transparent Electrodes • LCDs • Touch Screens

  24. Single-Wall Nanotube Thin Films Carbon Nanotubes on Glass 500 nm • Combine electrical and optical properties • Potential Applications • Transparent Electrodes • LCDs and Touch Screens Transmission vs. l for SWNTs Deposited from Various Solutions Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) image of SWNTs deposited on to glass

  25. 15 nm Molecular Beam Epitaxy(MBE): Self Assembly Picture of MBE/STM in situ STM of Dots

  26. Ordered Oxalic Near-Ordered Sulfuric Anodized Aluminum Oxide Masks • Tunable diameters: 20 to 500 nm • Ordered micron-sized domains

  27. Conclusions • Often a summary and conclusions Future • What will be done on the project after you leave/graduate

  28. Prof. John Wilkin’s Rules for Physics Talks • Rules for preparing talk/viewgraphs • Decide on take-home message.What do you want listeners to carry away? Design talk to that aim. • Pick figures and illustrations that deliver take-home message. • On each viewgraph, put • Title that summarize subject of viewgraph. • Carefully formulated argument. • Conclusion of argument at bottom of viewgraph. • Practice for: • Length. Shorter is better. • Connectivity. Cleanly segue from one viewgraph to the next. • Clarity . Formulate your ideas accurately and concisely. Segue • To move smoothly and unhesitatingly from one state, condition, situation, or element to another. "Daylight segued into dusk" - Susan Dworski. How do the world's most celebrated adolescents [sc. the Rolling Stones] segue into middle age? http://www.physics.ohio-state.edu/~wilkins/writing/