Staffing Analysis for Jails, Prisons and Community Corrections C-1F - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Staffing Analysis for Jails, Prisons and Community Corrections C-1F

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  1. Staffing Analysis for Jails, Prisons and Community CorrectionsC-1F ACA Winter Conference 2012 Karen Daniels, Oregon Youth Authority Arthur Thompson, AIA Rod Miller, CRS

  2. Please sign up or leave your card to receive an email link to the handbook, toolkit and more This powerpoint and everything we discuss will be available via the download

  3. Staffing “Analysis?” • Done a staffing analysis before? • What are you looking for when you examine staffing and/or conduct a staffing analysis? • What questions would you like to have us address today?

  4. The whole enchilada? • Most folks will not go through the whole process… • …or in order • Figure out what you are looking for • Use elements and tools to get there

  5. That said… • The NIC jail staffing analysis process, done in full, has been developed to provide practitioners with maximum benefits without having to hire outside help • Has been used, in whole or in part, in many different settings– prisons, jails, community corrections, police, fire departments, nursing homes • Any entity that encounters relieved posts or positions will find the process helpful

  6. Jail Staffing Analysis, 3rd Edition • Authors: • Rod C. Miller • John E. Wetzel • Contributors: • James M. Hart • Donald L. Leach II • David M. Parish • Arthur P. Thompson, AIA • Richard E. Wener, PhD • Many more practitioners have added to the process and the tools NSA Articles 2nd Edition

  7. Appendices Appendix A: Project Manager’s Guide Appendix B: The Myth of Staffing Ratios Appendix C: More on Net Annual Work Hours (NAWH) Appendix D: Staffing and the Courts Appendix E: Standards Appendix F: Using the Staffing Analysis Methodology to Analyze Overtime- A Case Study Appendix G: Increasing Staff Efficiency by Managing Inmate Behavior Appendix H: Evaluation Checklist Appendix I: Forms Appendix J: More on Scheduling and Scheduling Tools Appendix K: Research on the Effects of Shift Work

  8. Tools • “Autopost” Forms (in Excel) • Stand Alone Computer Program • Sample Staffing Analysis Reports • And More…

  9. Doesn’t Anyone Understand? What do “they” need to understand? Who are “they”? What information do we need to “paint the picture”? Do you know what is needed?

  10. What is a Comprehensive Staffing Analysis? • Wide ranging examination • Operational philosophy • Facility design • Classification of inmates • Rated capacity versus actual numbers • A step by step process • Data based • Everything is on the table for review and improvement

  11. What is a Staffing Analysis? • Interactive/Inclusive • Diagnostic Tool • Analysis versus documentation • Gets everyone to understand your operation • Educational tool for funding source • A chance to revisit all facets of your operations

  12. Isn’t There an Easier Way to Do This? • You have seen the allegedly easy ways to determine staffing needs (ratios) • One size does not fit all • It’s either a comprehensive process such as this one, or oversimplified and inadequate tools such as ratios • Easier yes, but not adequate and often wrong

  13. The NIC Process • Participation • Accuracy • Creativity • Responsibility • Credibility

  14. Two imperatives We have learned in the 20+ years since the NIC process was introduced that: • Nothing is too small to consider • Everything goes somewhere

  15. EXPLORING THE NINE STEPS (3rd Edition) • Comprehensive 9-step staffing analysis process breaks the work into manageable tasks: • 1. Describe the setting • 2. Chart activities • 3. Develop a coverage plan • 4. Evaluate the coverage plan • 5. Develop schedules and calculate efficiency • 6. Calculate Net Annual Work Hours (NAWH) • 7. Prepare a budget • 8. Write the report • 9. Implement and monitor

  16. 9 STEPS • 1. Describe the setting • 2. Chart activities • 3. Develop a coverage • plan • 4. Evaluate the coverage • plan • 5. Develop schedules and • calculate efficiency • 6. Calculate Net Annual • Work Hours (NAWH) • 7. Prepare a budget • 8. Write the report • 9. Implement and monitor

  17. OVERTIME Overtime is usually a symptom There are usually multiple causes Predicting overtime Managing overtime

  18. OVERTIME Can we operate our facilities without overtime? Is all overtime “bad?” It is important to find a balance point between regular hours and overtime

  19. Understanding • The Causes of • Overtime: • Use the • “Budgeting” • Flowchart

  20. Causes: The Context Changes in inmate population Higher classified inmates in less secure areas Changes in facility Changes in employees/staff More junior staff Changes in standards/caselaw Consent decree

  21. Causes: Coverage needs Changes noted in “context” Increase “details” taking staff from posts and demanding overtime Increase need for shakedowns because of contraband issues Increase in number of inmates in the hospital

  22. Causes: NAWH Vacancies Turnover Training FMLA, Military Length of time to hire/fill a vacancy Late “clock outs”

  23. Causes: Scheduling/Scheduling Factor Inherent inefficiency in schedule Schedule not responsive to coverage needs Managers not controlling the schedule “We’ve always done it that way” Collective bargaining agreements New schedules implemented Changing from 8’s to 12’s Coverage needs change, but schedules fail to follow

  24. EXPLORING THE NINE STEPS (3rd Edition) • Comprehensive 9-step staffing analysis process breaks the work into manageable tasks: • 1. Describe the setting • 2. Chart activities • 3. Develop a coverage plan • 4. Evaluate the coverage plan • 5. Develop schedules and calculate efficiency • 6. Calculate Net Annual Work Hours (NAWH) • 7. Prepare a budget • 8. Write the report • 9. Implement and monitor

  25. In the Field- Karen Daniels How the staffing analysis process has been used in: • Jails • Prisons • Juvenile system

  26. Step 1. The Setting • Staffing is a means to an end • It provides the means by which you implement your policies and practices within the physical setting • Staffing analysis process helps you identify the characteristics of the setting and later to systematically evaluate how well your coverage plan “fits”

  27. Facilities Technology Operations Inmates Employees Caselaw, statutes, standards Other So, has anything changed with your jails in the past 3 to 5 years?

  28. If any or many of these elements have changes in the past few years..… Does is followthat you should be critically and thoroughly review how you…. Recruit Select Train Deploy Schedule Direct Supervise EMPLOYEES?

  29. Step 1: Describe The Setting This step examines and records key features and characteristics of the jail setting, including— Facility rated capacity. Average daily population for the past several years. Number of admissions and releases. Mission statement. Facility design (floor plan). Organizational chart, span of control, management philosophy……

  30. Describe…… Current staffing plan, schedule, shift rosters. Current staff work-hour information. Length of stay. Inmate profiles (age, race, sex, residence, charge, status—pretrial, presentencing, sentenced, hold). Type of charges (traffic, misdemeanor, felony; violent, nonviolent). Number and types of classifications and housing separations.

  31. Design Decisions impact Staffing Operational Principals Security Control Configuration Security Systems and Technology Housing and the delivery of services Inmate Programs Visitation Medical Food Laundry and Commissary Intake and Release Single Story vs Multi Story

  32. Design Decisions impact StaffingOperational Principals Direct Supervision Indirect Supervision Supervision v.s observation Facility size Inmate Classifications Existing Configuration Facility age Local Standards

  33. Design Decisions impact StaffingSecurity Control Configuration Number and location of control rooms Secondary duties of control staff Sightlines Housing Control Stations open/enclosed Split level control room locations

  34. Design Decisions impact StaffingSecurity Systems and Technology CCTV Swipe or proximity card readers Hand held devices

  35. Design Decisions impact StaffingHousing Size of unit Type of supervision Sub units for classifications Shape of Unit Adjacent housing Units to reduce staff after lock down Impact of double bunking Type of sleeping single, double, dorm Housing for special needs Work force or pre-release housing

  36. Design Decisions impact StaffingHousing Size of unit

  37. Design Decisions impact StaffingHousing Sub Units for Classifications

  38. Design Decisions impact StaffingHousing Adjacent Housing Units to reduce staffing after lock down

  39. Design Decisions impact StaffingHousing Type of sleeping: single double dorm

  40. Design Decisions impact StaffingDelivery of Services: Inmate Programs

  41. Design Decisions impact StaffingDelivery of Services: Inmate Programs

  42. Design Decisions impact StaffingDelivery of Services Delivery of services and programs on the housing unit Centralized delivery of programs and services Sightlines to enable inmate movement

  43. Design Decisions impact StaffingDelivery of Services: Visitation Centralized vs Decentralized Contact/non contact/video visitation

  44. Design Decisions impact StaffingDelivery of Services: Medical Services Medication Dispensing: Nurses dispense at the housing unit or the inmates come to the clinic Triage on the unit or in a central clinic Video medicine to reduce transport to outside facilities for specialties. Infirmary beds in the facility and the ability to provide medical isolation

  45. Design Decisions impact StaffingDelivery of Services: Food Service Laundry and Commissary Type of distribution and supervision Laundries in the housing units Contract services

  46. Design Decisions impact StaffingIntake/Release Shared Spaces with intake release and transport. Secure Holding cells v.s. open waiting Release to public lobby Separate Release Bonding access Access to Medical

  47. Design Decisions impact StaffingSingle v.s. Multistory Design Can impact inmate movement Can impact staff movement Can complicate visitation Sight lines can be impacted Long horizontal movements of staff can require more staff Vertical organization may require more control points Careful design can avoid additional staff