Download
honors chemistry unit 7 stoichiometry n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Honors Chemistry Unit 7 – Stoichiometry PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Honors Chemistry Unit 7 – Stoichiometry

Honors Chemistry Unit 7 – Stoichiometry

240 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Honors Chemistry Unit 7 – Stoichiometry

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Honors ChemistryUnit 7 – Stoichiometry Lesson 1 – Stoichiometry Book Section: 9-1, 9-2 Objective: SWBAT solve reaction stoichiometry problems involving moles and mass. Agenda: Exam Review, Lesson, Practice, HW

  2. Unit 7 – Stoichiometry • Lesson 1 – Stoichiometry • Lesson 2 - Percent Yield • Lesson 3 – Limiting Reagents • Lesson 4 – Molarity • Lesson 5 – Solution Stoichiometry • Lesson 6 – Titrations • Labs: Quantitative Study of Chemical Reactions, Stoichiometry

  3. Stoichiometry • Comes from the Greek “stoicheion”, meaning element, and “metron,” meaning measure. • Stoichiometry is essentially, the mathematical study of chemical reactions. • This topic combines mole relationships with chemical reactions.

  4. Stoichiometry • N2 + 3H2 2NH3 • The coefficients of a chemical reaction tells you the molar ratio, or stoichiometric coefficients, to be used to convert between different chemicals. • For example, every one mole of nitrogen gas requires three moles of hydrogen gas to react completely.

  5. Making Pancakes? • 1 cup flour • 2 tablespoons sugar • 1 teaspoon salt • 1 egg • 1 cup milk • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil • 2 tablespoons baking powder • Makes 12 pancakes

  6. Making Pancakes? If we want to double our recipe, we need to double our ingredients. In a chemical reaction, if we want to double our products, we have to double our reactants. • 1 cup flour • 2 tablespoons sugar • 1 teaspoon salt • 1 egg • 1 cup milk • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil • 2 tablespoons baking powder • Makes 12 pancakes

  7. Stoichiometric Setup • A  2B • In order to convert between grams of A and grams of B, you have to use molar masses and the molar ratio as conversion factors. • If you are not given a reaction, you must generate it yourself! • grams A  moles A  moles B  grams B (molar mass A) (molar ratio) (molar mass B)

  8. Sample Problem • What number of moles of O2 are needed to produce 14.2 grams of P4O10 from P? (molar mass of P4O10 = 284 g/mol)

  9. Sample Problem • What number of moles of O2 are needed to produce 14.2 grams of P4O10 from P? (molar mass of P4O10 = 284 g/mol) • 0.250 mol

  10. HW: #1-6 • This Week & After Break: • Thursday: Stoichiometry Practice (9-1, 9-2), Sing/Doub Replacement Due • Mon. 1/3: Percent Yield (9-3) • Tuesday: Quantitative Study of Chemical Reactions • Wednesday: Quantitative Study of Chemical Reactions • Thursday: Limiting Reagents (9-3) • Friday: Stoichiometry Lab