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Revolutionising the Lifecycle of Pharmaceuticals

Revolutionising the Lifecycle of Pharmaceuticals

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Revolutionising the Lifecycle of Pharmaceuticals

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  1. Revolutionising the Lifecycle of Pharmaceuticals Eyeforpharma RWD conference June 5, 2013

  2. Topics • Introduction to CASMI • Current lifecycle and its issues • Forces shaping the future • Adaptive licensing and its consequences • Real world data and its role • Speculations about where we are headed • Lessons for today

  3. Topics • Introduction to CASMI • Current lifecycle and its issues • Forces shaping the future • Adaptive licensing and its consequences • Real world data and its role • Speculations about where we are headed • Lessons for today

  4. = Centre for the Advancement of Sustainable Medical Innovation = www.casmi.org.uk

  5. The Innovation Gap progress Bioscience – understanding human biology and disease = potential patient benefit The Innovation Gap Actual patient benefit time

  6. The danger of doing nothing progress Bioscience – understanding human biology and disease = potential patient benefit - First ever industry reduction in R&D spend - $4bn drop in overall US spending in 2011 Actual patient benefit time

  7. What’s distinctive about CASMI? • Providing independent thought leadership, convening power - and so acting as a catalyst for change • Embedded in UCL and Oxford, but networked with other European and international centres • Interdisciplinary – Medical, Bioscience, Law, Ethics, Business, Economics, Statistics etc • Convening all stakeholders: academia, industry, patient groups, regulators, policymakers, investors Centre for the Advancement of Sustainable Medical Innovation

  8. A Global Solution requires a Global Network EFPIA IMI Other European centres

  9. Three core “gaps in translation” persist across the value chain Gap 2: Failure to gain approval after costly development Gap 1: Failure to turn early stage research into potential products Gap 3: Failure to achieve widespread use and patient adherence to treatment

  10. Topics • Introduction to CASMI • Current lifecycle and its issues • Forces shaping the future • Adaptive licensing and its consequences • Speculations about where we are headed

  11. PV & RM Access I II IIIa Review HTA IIIb IV FIM PoC Ph III entry P&R Launch Regul. Subm. & approval • Key characteristics of current model • Inflexible processes and method • Expensive and increasing data demands • Lack of early alignment between key parties: • Segmented input & decision making • Accessneeds not designed in • Patient perspective not fully addressed External activities Sponsor activities Current development path

  12. Topics • Introduction to CASMI • Current lifecycle and its issues • Forces shaping the future • Adaptive licensing and its consequences • Real world data and its role • Speculations about where we are headed • Lessons for today

  13. Forces shaping the future of biopharma

  14. Topics • Introduction to CASMI • Current lifecycle and its issues • Forces shaping the future • Adaptive licensing and its consequences • Real world data and its role • Speculations about where we are headed • Lessons for today

  15. Potential New Flexible Blueprint Phase IV PhV & B/R Preclinical Regulatory Review Phase I Phase 2 Phase 3 Access Reviews Patient Use Exploratory R&D Confirmatory trials Basic division between exploratory and confirmatory trials, rather than Phases I-IV Reference: Athenaeum Group

  16. Potential New Flexible Blueprint PhV & B/R Regulatory Review Review & design Access Reviews Patient Use Exploratory R&D Confirmatory trials Collaborative design step before the most expensive confirmatory trials are commissioned

  17. Potential New Flexible Blueprint PhV & B/R Regulatory Review Review & design Access Reviews Submit & Confirm approval Patient Use Exploratory R&D Confirmatory trials Initial access Ability/need to customise the model for different benefit/risk/uncertainty profiles

  18. Potential New Flexible Blueprint PhV & B/R Review & design Access Reviews Submit & Confirm approval Patient Use Exploratory R&D Confirmatory trials Initial access Early access on condition of data collection Ability to allow early, controlled patient access, if justified by interim findings in confirmatory trials

  19. Potential New Flexible Blueprint PhV & B/R Review & design Submit & Confirm approval Exploratory R&D Confirmatory trials Effectiveness/comparative studies Initial access Early access on condition of data collection Subject to requirements for pharmacovigilance and pharmaceconomic analyses before full ‘green light’ for wide access and longer term reimbursement policy

  20. Key elements of the concept EMA, based on rapporteur evaluation of submission • Stakeholders: • Sponsor • Regulator • HTA • Patient org Patients treated; sponsor reimbursed Outcome, safety data collection via reliable network * MAPPs = Medicines Adaptive Pathways for Patients

  21. Do you have a potential pilot? - draft pilot selection criteria • A robust case for accelerated process – including unmet clinical need. • Strong efficacy signal from initial trials; positive benefit/risk profile likely • Sufficient numbers of patients that can be recruited. • Appropriate data collection mechanisms: robust trial networks in the specific disease area with clinicians that are interested in participating in research • Existing patient support mechanisms • Could be either a new NCE/NBE or one approved in another indication

  22. Topics • Introduction to CASMI • Current lifecycle and its issues • Forces shaping the future • Adaptive licensing and its consequences • Real world data and its role • Speculations about where we are headed • Lessons for today

  23. RCTs • May be unnecessary, inappropriate, inadequate, or impractical • Efficacy versus effectiveness • Population: may not be available for sub-populations and vulnerable populations • Interventions: may not be able to assign high-risk interventions randomly • Comparators: may not represent standard care • Outcomes: may report intermediate outcomes rather than main health outcomes of interest • Timing: may be too short in duration • Setting: may not represent typical practice • Expense and bureaucracy

  24. Hierarchies of evidence should be replaced by accepting—indeed embracing—a diversity of approaches. This is not a plea to abandon RCTs and replace them with observational studies. Nor is it a claim that the bayesian approaches to the design and analysis of experimental and non-experimental data should supplant all other statistical methods. Rather, it is a plea to investigators to continue to develop and improve their methods; to decision makers to avoid adopting entrenched positions about the nature of evidence; and for both to accept that the interpretation of evidence requires judgment.

  25. Efficacy patient benefit and harm in experimental and closely monitored research studies, normally RCTs. major advantages in minimising bias generalisability questionable restricted entry criteria unrepresentative settings Effectiveness patient benefit and harm when the technology is actually applied in everyday practice. pragmatic clinical trials adverse event reporting clinical audit Efficacyveffectiveness

  26. Groundbreaking RWD Study Launched in Salford The Salford Lung Study is a unique collaboration between GSK, North West e-Health (NWeH), The University of Manchester, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, NHS Salford, local GPs and local community pharmacists.  Around 4,000 patients with COPD and 5,000 patients with asthma from Salford, Greater Manchester, will be enrolled in the year-long study.   It is the first time a large, ‘real-world’ study has been performed on a pre-licence medicine, across a large population within one geographical setting. It will utilise Salford’s e-Health records infrastructure – a clinical information system providing a single, integrated electronic patient record across both primary and secondary care.

  27. Topics • Introduction to CASMI • Current lifecycle and its issues • Forces shaping the future • Adaptive licensing and its consequences • Real world data and its role • Speculations about where we are headed • Lessons for today

  28. Consequences of these developments ….? Sharper definition of patient populations Increasing pressure on budgets and prices CPRD and related e-health develop- ments Increasing focus on outcomes

  29. Topics • Introduction to CASMI • Current lifecycle and its issues • Forces shaping the future • Adaptive licensing and its consequences • Real world data and its role • Speculations about where we are headed • Lessons for today

  30. Topics • Introduction to CASMI • Current lifecycle and its issues • Forces shaping the future • Adaptive licensing and its consequences • Real world data and its role • Speculations about where we are headed • Lessons for today

  31. Lessons for today • Ensure you’re well networked into industry bodies (like ABPI) • Have a medical information lead on board in your company • Ensure cross-functional dialogue • Consider AL/MAPPs for early stage projects (Phase 1 onwards) • Monitor RWD developments (like GSK’sSalford project and IMI’s GetReal) and their findings • Find one or more centres (HERCs?) focused on relevant therapeutic areas • Consider creating a collaborative project to monitor and evaluate your product’s outcomes