Download
science chapter 8 weather n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Science ~ chapter 8 weather PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Science ~ chapter 8 weather

Science ~ chapter 8 weather

109 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Science ~ chapter 8 weather

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Science ~ chapter 8weather Miss Nelson

  2. Section 1 Water in the Atmosphere

  3. Anticipatory set What happens to the mirror in your bathroom when you take a hot shower?

  4. Anticipatory set What happens to the mirror in your bathroom when you take a hot shower? Warm, moist air from the shower comes in contact with cool surface of the mirror. The air cools and can hold less water vapor. As a result, water vapor condenses on the mirror. Clouds form in the same way!

  5. standards S 6.4.e – Students know differences in pressure, heat, air movement, and humidity result in change in weather

  6. The big idea What is humidity and how is it measured? How do clouds form? What are the three main types of clouds?

  7. Key terms • Water cycle – the continual movement of water among Earth’s atmosphere, oceans, and land through evaporation, condensation, and precipitation • Evaporation – the process by which water molecules in liquid water escape into the air as water vapor • Humidity – the amount of water vapor in a given volume of air • Relative humidity - the percentage of water vapor in the air compressed to the maximum amount of water vapor that air can contain at a given temperature • Psychrometer – an instrument used to measure relative humidity, consisting of a wet-bulb thermometer and a dry-bulb thermometer

  8. Key terms • Condensation – the process by which molecules of water vapor in the air become liquid water • Dew point – the temperature at which condensation begins • Cirrus – wispy, feathery clouds made mostly of ice crystals that form at high levels • Cumulus – fluffy, white clouds, usually with flat bottoms that look like rounded piles of cotton • Stratus – clouds that form in flat layers and often cover much of the sky

  9. The Water cycle View the diagram on page 301 of your textbook Read Water in the Atmosphere on page 300 of your textbook

  10. humidity Humidity is a measure of the amount of water vapor in the air Air’s ability to hold water vapor depends on its temperature Warm air = more water vapor than cool air

  11. Relative humidity • Weather reports usually refer to the water vapor in the air as relative humidity • Relative humidity is the percentage of water vapor that is actually in the air compared to the maximum amount of water vapor the air can hold at a particular temperature • Air with a relative humidity of 100 percent is said to be saturated

  12. Measuring relative humidity Relative humidity can be measured with an instrument called a psychrometer

  13. humidity Read Humidity on pages 301-302 of your textbook

  14. How clouds form Clouds form when water vapor in the air condenses to form liquid water or ice crystals Process is called condensation

  15. How clouds form Two conditions are required for condensation: • Cooling of the air • Presence of particles in the air

  16. The role of cooling • As air cools, the amount of water vapor it can hold decreases • The water vapor condenses into tiny droplets of water or ice crystals • The temperature at which condensation begins is called the dew point • Dew point above freezing = water droplets • Dew point below freezing = ice crystals

  17. The role of particles • For water vapor to condense, tiny particles must be present • The water vapor needs a surface on which to condense • In cloud formation, most of these particles are: • Salt crystals • Dust from soil • Smoke

  18. Types of clouds • Scientists classify clouds into three main types based on their shape: • Cirrus • Cumulus • Status • Clouds are further classified by their altitude

  19. Cirrus clouds • Wispy, feathery clouds • Comes from the word meaning “a curl of hair” • Form only at high levels where temperatures are very low • As a result, are made of ice crystals • Have feathery “hooked” ends • Look like the scales of a fish

  20. Cumulus clouds • Look like fluffy, rounded piles of cotton • Word means “heap” or “mass” in Latin • Usually indicate fair weather • When you add the suffix –nimbus, which means “rain,” you get clouds that produce thunderstorms

  21. Stratus clouds • Form in flat layers • Strato means “spread out” • Usually cover most of the sky • Are a uniform, dull, gray color • As they thicken they produce rain or snow • Called nimbostratus clouds

  22. Altocumulus and altostratus • Part of a cloud’s name may be based on its height • Clouds that form between 2-6 kilometers above the surface have the prefix alto- (means high) • Altocumulus and altostratus are the two main types of these clouds

  23. fog • Clouds that form near the ground are called fog • Often forms when the ground cools at night after a warm, humid day • More common near bodies of water or low-lying marshy areas

  24. Types of clouds Read Types of Clouds on pages 304 – 306 of your textbook

  25. Check for understanding What is humidity? How is it measured?

  26. Check for understanding What is humidity? Humidity is a measure of the amount of water vapor in the air. How is it measured? Humidity is measured using “relative humidity,” which is the percentage of water vapor that is actually in the air compared to the amount of water vapor the air can hold at a particular temperature. Relative humidity can be measured using a psychrometer.

  27. Guided practice How do clouds form? What are the three main types of clouds?

  28. Guided practice How do clouds form? Clouds form when water vapor in the air condenses to form liquid water or ice crystals. What are the three main types of clouds? The three main types of clouds are cirrus, cumulus, and stratus.

  29. Independent practice Complete Weather 8-1 Independent Practice