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Eun-Woo Chang Eileen Lewis ewchang@nsf ellewis@nsf Division of Undergraduate Education PowerPoint Presentation
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Eun-Woo Chang Eileen Lewis ewchang@nsf ellewis@nsf Division of Undergraduate Education

Eun-Woo Chang Eileen Lewis ewchang@nsf ellewis@nsf Division of Undergraduate Education

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Eun-Woo Chang Eileen Lewis ewchang@nsf ellewis@nsf Division of Undergraduate Education

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  1. “NSF’s Division of Undergraduate Education: Funding Opportunities for Community Colleges and Partnerships”Innovations 2009 Eun-Woo Chang Eileen Lewis ewchang@nsf.govellewis@nsf.gov Division of Undergraduate Education National Science Foundation March 16, 2009

  2. Purpose of this session To share information about several specific NSF programs from which you may wish to seek funding

  3. www.nsf.gov

  4. “EHR’s Mission is to promote the development of a diverse and well-prepared workforce of scientists, engineers, mathematicians, educators, and technicians and a well informed citizenry who have access to the ideas and tools of science and engineering.”

  5. The Role of Community Colleges in the Education of Recent Science and Engineering Graduates • 44% of all S & E 1999 and 2000 graduates with a bachelor’s or master’s degree attended a community college (more than 50% of the bachelors and 35% of the masters) • 51% of Hispanic bachelor’s and masters graduates and 18% of the Hispanic Ph.D.s attended a community college

  6. The Role of Community Colleges in the Education of Recent Science and Engineering Graduates • 62% of female graduates and 51% of male graduates who had children attended a community college • 42% of the graduates who had a GPA between 3.75 and 4.00 attended a community college

  7. NSF Budget • Education and Human Resources (EHR): FY 2009 (Requested) $709 Million • Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE): FY 2007 (Actual) $204.96 Million FY 2008 (Estimate) $211.05 Million FY 2009 (Requested) $219.83 Million *Note: Extra $75 million from H-1B visa fees employers pay to obtain a visa for a foreign high-tech worker to fund the S-STEM program.

  8. NSF Budget • Stimulus Plan 2009 for DUE - NOYCE Scholarship Program: 60 M - Math and Science Partnership (MSP) Program: 25 M

  9. Selected Programs in DUE FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 (Actual) (Estimate) (Requested) ATE$50.58 $51.62 $51.62 CCLI $37.78 $37.50 $39.21 STEP $28.90 $29.70 $29.70 S-STEM~ $75 /year from H1B visa fee NOYCE $10.30 $10.80 (55) $11.60 (115) * (in Million)

  10. NSF support for two-year college projects FY 2006-2008

  11. The Unconventional Way of Repairing

  12. Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement(CCLI)PROGRAM SOLICITATION NSF 09-529

  13. CCLI Vision Excellent STEM education for all undergraduate students. Goal Stimulate, disseminate, and institutionalize innovative developments in STEM education through the production of knowledge and the improvement of practice. *Most comprehensive program

  14. New Materials and Strategies Research on Teaching and Learning Increase Faculty Expertise Assess And Evaluate Implement Innovation Cyclic Model

  15. CCLI Supports efforts that Bring advances in STEM disciplinary knowledge into curriculum Create or adapt learning materials and teaching strategies Develop faculty expertise Promote widespread implementation of educational innovations

  16. CCLI Supports efforts that Prepare future K-12 teachers Enhance our understanding of how students learn STEM topics Enhance our understanding how faculty adopt instructional approaches Build capacity for assessment and evaluation Further the work of the program

  17. CCLI • Program especially encourages projects that: • Have potential to transform undergraduate STEM education • Produce widespread adoption of classroom practices based on how students learn • Explore cyberlearning

  18. PROJECT COMPONENTS • NOTE: Instrumentation and equipment requests are appropriate -- based on learning impact

  19. Important Project Features • Quality, Relevance, and Impact • Describe a recognized need or opportunity and an innovative approach • Student Focus • Link activities and improvements in STEM learning • Knowledge about STEM Education: • Build on existing work & disseminate new finding and results • STEM Education Community-Building • Interact with others in the STEM education community

  20. Important Project Features • Sustainability • Demonstrate reasonable expectation of persistent effects • Expected Measurable Outcomes • Describe goals & expected measurable outcomes • Project Evaluation • Monitor progress toward expected outcomes and success in achieving them

  21. Type 1 Projects • 70 to 75 awards expected • Total budget up to $200,000 for 2 to 3 years • 250,000 when 4-year and 2-year schools collaborate • Deadline • May 21, 2009 (A-M states) • May 22, 2009 (N-Z states)

  22. Type 1 Projects • Typically involve a single institution & one program component • Contribute to the understanding of undergraduate STEM education

  23. Type 2 Projects • 20 to 25 awards expected • Total budget up to $600,000 for 2 to 4 years. • Deadline January 13, 2010

  24. Type 2 Projects • Typically involve multiple institutions & several program components – but exceptions • Typically based on prior work with results explicitly described – but exceptions • Produce evidence on the effectiveness • Institutionalize at the participating schools

  25. Type 3 Projects • 3 to 5 awards expected • Budget negotiable, but not to exceed $5,000,000 over 5 years. • Deadline January 13, 2010

  26. Type 3 Projects • Large scale efforts • Typically based on prior work with results explicitly described – but exceptions • Produce evidence of student learning in a broad population • Describe impact of the work on the prevailing models • Describe strategies for implementation in new contexts

  27. CCLI Central Resource Projects • 1 to 3 awards expected • Budget negotiable, depending on the scope and scale of the activity • Small focused workshop projects -- 1 to 2 years & up to $100,000 • Large scale projects -- 3 to 5 years & $300,000 to $3,000,000 • Deadline January 13, 2010

  28. CCLI Central Resource Projects • Implement activities to sustain the STEM community • Increase the capabilities of and communications in the STEM community • Increase and document the impact of CCLI projects

  29. Advanced Technological Education(ATE)

  30. ATE • Goal: Educate technicians for the high-tech fields that drive our nation’s economy • Sample activities: • Curriculum development • Faculty professional development • Building career pathways

  31. ATE • ATE is in its 16th year of funding community colleges, having started with the Science and Advanced Technology Act of 1992 (SATA). • FY2009 Preliminary Proposals April 23, 2009 Formal Proposals Oct. 15, 2009

  32. ATE Institution Requirements • Focus is on two-year colleges • All proposals are expected to include one or more two-year colleges in leadership roles • A consortium of institutions may also apply

  33. ATE Tracks • Projects • Program improvement • Professional development for educators • Curriculum and educational materials development • Teacher preparation • Small grants to new awardees

  34. Small grants • Focus on community colleges that have little or no previous ATE grant experience • Designed to stimulate implementation, adaptation, and innovation in tech. education

  35. ATE Tracks • ATE Centers • National Centers of Excellence • Regional Centers of Excellence • Resource Centers • Targeted research on technician education

  36. ATE awards (FY2008) • Typical award sizes: Projects: $200K / year for 3 years (45 new awards) Small Grants: $75K / year for 2 years (15 new awards) National Centers: $1.2M / year for 4 years (2 new awards)

  37. ATE Professional Development Opportunities • Go to www.TeachingTechnicians.org • Now over 100 professional development opportunities

  38. 9 Number of Awards per State in ATE’s 15 Year HistoryTotal number of Awards (865) 30 WASHINGTON 6 MAINE 3 MONTANA 5 NORTH DAKOTA 18 MINNESOTA 2 VT. 7 N.H. 25 OREGON 19 WISCONSIN 62 MA. 2 IDAHO 47 NEW YORK 4 SOUTH DAKOTA 2 WYOMING 16 MICHIGAN 14 CT. 16 PENNSYLVANIA 1 R.I. 23 IOWA 16 N.J. 7 NEBRASKA 3 NEVADA 42 OHIO 2 DEL. 8 INDIANA 28 ILLINOIS 2 UTAH 26 MD. 2 W.V. 15 COLORADO 22 VIRGINIA 6 MISSOURI 20 D.C. 3 KANSAS 18 KENTUCKY 99 CALIFORNIA 18 NORTH CAROLINA 18 TENNESSEE 7 OKLAHOMA 21 ARIZONA 4 ARKANSAS 22 S.C. 16 NEW MEXICO 9 GEORGIA 12 MISS. 15 ALABAMA 53 TEXAS 3 LOUISIANA 32 FLA. 3 ALASKA 3PUERTO RICO HAWAII

  39. ATE Centers of Excellence (36) National Center Regional Center Resource Center

  40. Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Talent Expansion Program (STEP) 45

  41. STEP Goal: to increase the number of students (U.S. citizens or permanent residents) RECEIVING associate or baccalaureate degrees in established or emerging fields within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)

  42. STEP Tracks Type 1: Implement strategies that will increase the number of students obtaining STEM degrees. Type 2: Conduct research on factors affecting associate or baccalaureate degree attainment in STEM 47

  43. STEP Type 1 Possible project activities: Focus directly on student learning Incorporate current technology Develop interdisciplinary approaches Offer bridge programs Increases in a particular field must not be at the expense of other fields! 48

  44. Submission & Funding Trends

  45. STEP awards (FY2008) Maximum award sizes Type 1 (15-20 awards anticipated) $100K/year for 5 years for SFTE <5000 $200K/year for 5 years for 5000<SFTE<15000 $400K/year for 5 years for 15000<SFTE Type 2: $500K/year for 3 years (2 awards anticipated) 50