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Welcome and Overview

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  1. Planning a System of Interventions to Prepare Students for College and Careers:Lessons From Research and PracticeMarch 24, 2014Lexington, KentuckyMarch 25, 2014Bowling Green, Kentucky
  2. Welcome and Overview

    Justin Baer Director, REL Appalachia CNA
  3. What is a REL? A REL is a Regional Educational Laboratory. There are 10 RELs across the country. The REL program is administered by the U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences (IES). A REL serves the education needs of a designated region. The REL works in partnership with the region’s school districts, state departments of education, and others to use data and research to improve academic outcomes for students.
  4. What is a REL?
  5. REL Appalachia’s mission Meet the applied research and technical assistance needs of Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. Conduct empirical research and analysis. Bring evidence-based information to policy makers and practitioners: Inform policy and practice – for states, districts, schools, and other stakeholders. Focus on high-priority, discrete issues and build a body of knowledge over time. http://RELAappalachia.org/ Follow us! @REL_Appalachia
  6. Catching Up to College and Career Readiness:The Importance of Early Learning

    Chrys Dougherty Senior Research Scientist, ACT, Inc.
  7. The Importance of Early Learning Learning gaps emerge early. Learning gaps often widen over time (“Matthew effects”). Learning is cumulative and takes time. Student interests often develop at an early age. Empirical evidence shows the difficulty of catching students up in middle and high school.
  8. ACT Kentucky “Catching Up” Study Information on the forthcoming slides is from a not-yet-released ACT analysis of Kentucky student data.
  9. Findings of ACT Kentucky “Catching Up” Study A high percentage of students from at-risk groups are far off track at the beginning of middle and high school. Few of these students catch up to college and career readiness benchmarks. Far-off-track students from at-risk groups catch up at lower rates. This is consistent with findings from other analyses in other states.
  10. Kentucky Datasets for “Catching Up” Study Three cohorts, grades 8‒11: ACT EXPLORE® in grade 8; ACT in grade 11. 2007‒2010, 2008‒2011, and 2009‒2012. Approximately 95,300 students. Two cohorts, grades 4‒8: KCCT in grade 4; ACT EXPLORE® in grade 8. 2007‒2011 and 2008‒2012. Approximately 74,600 students.
  11. Academic Measures of Being On Track Grades 11‒12: Meeting ACT College Readiness Benchmark. Grade 8: Meeting ACT EXPLORE® College Readiness Benchmark. Grade 4: On track (based on a longitudinal analysis) to reach the EXPLORE® College Readiness Benchmark in grade 8.
  12. Three Student Academic Preparation Groups On Track: [previous slide] Off Track: No more than one standard deviation below the On Track level. Far Off Track: More than one standard deviation below the On Track level (≈ 4 points on ACT EXPLORE®, depending on the subject).
  13. Far-Off-Track At-Risk Grade 8 Students in 2007‒2009 Source: Dougherty, C., Hiserote, L., & Shaw, T. (in press). Catching up to college and career readiness in Kentucky. ACT Research Report. Iowa City, IA: ACT.
  14. Far-Off-Track At-Risk Grade 4 Students in 2007 and 2008 Source: Dougherty et al., in press.
  15. Grade 11 Success Depends on Grade 8 Preparation Source: Dougherty et al., in press.
  16. Among Far-Off-Track Grade 8 Students, Low-IncomeStudents Catch Up at Lower Rates in Grades 8‒11 Source: Dougherty et al., in press.
  17. Among Far-Off-Track Grade 8 Students, Minority Students Catch Up at Lower Rates in Grades 8‒11 Source: Dougherty et al., in press.
  18. Far-Off-Track English Language Learners and Special Ed Students Catch Up at Lower Rates in Grades 8‒11 Source: Dougherty et al., in press.
  19. Grade 8 Success Depends on Grade 4 Preparation Source: Dougherty et al., in press.
  20. Among Far-Off-Track Grade 4 Students, Low-Income Students Catch Up at Lower Rates in Grades 4‒8 Source: Dougherty et al., in press.
  21. Among Far-Off-Track Grade 4 Students, Minority Students Catch Up at Lower Rates in Grades 4‒8 Source: Dougherty et al., in press.
  22. Far-Off-Track English Language Learners and Special Ed Students Catch Up at Lower Rates in Grades 4‒8 Source: Dougherty et al., in press.
  23. The Importance of Early Learning Learning gaps emerge early. Learning gaps often widen over time (“Matthew effects”). Learning is cumulative and takes time. Student interests often develop at an early age. Empirical evidence shows the difficulty of catching students up in middle and high school.
  24. Remedies? Remedies?
  25. What Do the Common Core State Standards Recommend? “By reading texts in history/social studies, science, and other disciplines, students build a foundation of knowledge in these fields that will also give them the background to be better readers in all content areas. Students can only gain this foundation when the curriculum is intentionally and coherently structured to develop rich content knowledge within and across grades.” (emphasis added) Source: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects, p. 10
  26. Interpreting What This Means Teach a broad curriculum in science, history, geography, civics, and the fine arts, as well as reading and mathematics in the early grades. “Curriculum” refers to the specific content that is to be taught and learned in each grade and subject. “Early grades” refers to preschool through grade 5.
  27. Are Elementary Schools Teaching a Content-Rich Curriculum? Study of 780 grade 3 classrooms in 2000 and 2001:* Percent of observed time devoted to science: 5%** Percent of observed time devoted to social studies (history, geography, civics, and economics combined): 5%** Has the situation improved since 2001? * National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. ** Included reading/writing activities where the subject was science or social studies.
  28. How Content-Rich Early Education Helps Helps develop students’ interests and curiosity. Encourages reading habits. Develops reading comprehension by building background knowledge and vocabulary.
  29. Reading Ability Depends on Decoding and Comprehension Decoding is the ability to identify words based on letter-sound relationships― for example, that the sequence of letters l-y-m-p-h-o-c-y-t-e makes the word lymphocyte. Comprehensionin this example means knowing what a “lymphocyte” is. Students with poor vocabulary and background knowledge often have trouble with comprehension, even if they are good at decoding text.
  30. How Vocabulary and Knowledge Affect Reading Comprehension “Lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) activation plays a vital role in T cell activation through co-stimulation and adhesion. LFA-1 activation involves changes in both affinity and avidity, which affect the T cell activation through LFA-1 regulated intracellular signaling pathways.” Source: Mark Dougherty, “LFA-1 Effects on T-Cell Activation in a Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction,” paper written during summer research internship at M.D. Anderson Cancer Research Center. First two sentences of the paper.
  31. How Vocabulary and Knowledge Affect Reading Comprehension (cont.) Baseball: “Jones sacrificed and knocked in a run.” Cricket: “Clarke clinically cut and drove to 10 fours in a 134-ball 81, before he stepped out to Kumble to present an easy stumping to Mahendra Singh Dhoni.”
  32. An ACT Resource for System-Wide Improvement:The Core Practice Framework Three levels: district, school, and classroom. Five areas of focus (themes): Curriculum and academic goals. Staff selection, leadership, and capacity building. Instructional tools: programs and strategies. Monitoring performance and progress. Intervention and adjustment. Rubrics to help educators self-assess their implementation of each detailed practice.
  33. An ACT Resource for System-Wide Improvement:The Core Practice Framework Three levels: district, school, and classroom. Five areas of focus (themes): Curriculum and academic goals. Staff selection, leadership, and capacity building. Instructional tools: programs and strategies. Monitoring performance and progress. Intervention and adjustment. Rubrics to help educators self-assess their implementation of each detailed practice.
  34. Why Create a Student Intervention Database? We lack dose-response information on what interventions or combinations of interventions carry students how far. Interventions may need to last longer than what we are accustomed to.
  35. Sample Variables for Student Intervention Database Code for the type of intervention. Codes for the length of the intervention(e.g., hours per week, total number of weeks). Start and end dates of the intervention. Student’s rate of attendance/participation in the intervention.
  36. Sample Student Record in Intervention Database Student information: Jane Doe Student ID (links to Jane’s other student data, including interim assessment data) Grade 2 Intervention type: After-school tutoring in decoding skills Number of times per week: 3 Total number of hours per week: 2.25 Number of weeks: 12 Intervention start: 01-14-2014 Intervention end: 05-3-2014 Attendance rate:67%
  37. Who Might Create This Database? Most likely, a single district or a consortium of districts. An outside organization or entity may facilitate the creation of the database (e.g., state education agency, university, or independent nonprofit). District personnel may partner with university researchers to analyze the data.
  38. Contact Information Research and Policy on the ACT website: http://www.act.org/ (see link to “Research and Policy”) ACT Policy Reports and Issue Briefs: http://www.act.org/research-policy/policy-publications/ Email: chrys.dougherty@act.org
  39. Small Group Activity

    Lydotta Taylor Alliance Lead, REL Appalachia
  40. Discussion Questions What is our district/school doing well? What are areas for improvement? What steps can we take to address areas for improvement? What else do we need to know about this topic?
  41. Harrison County Schools: Early Learning Interventions in Practice

    Jenny Lynn Hatter Chief Academic Officer Melissa Miles Instructional Coach & Math Early Grades Specialist
  42. Early Learning Interventions in Practice Stuck On An Escalator https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrSUe_m19FY
  43. Early Learning Interventions in Practice 43
  44. Early Learning Interventions in Practice Kentucky System of Interventions Universal screening/frequent data collection and analysis: Provides information to guide decision making for all students. Used to determine which students need further support. Administered, scored, and interpreted in a short timeframe to allow for timely decision making. Harrison County Schools Measures of Academic Progress (MAPs). Administered and analyzed three times during the school year: fall, winter, spring. Used in monthly reading and math intervention meetings to guide decision making for school-wide RtI time. 44
  45. Early Learning Interventions in Practice Kentucky System of Interventions Progress monitoring/data-based decision making: Determines whether the intervention is successful in helping the student meet expectations at an appropriate rate. Informs during the decision-making process. Given frequently and the data is reviewed/evaluated often. Harrison County Schools DIBELS is used for reading progress monitoring. Math MAPs and fluency assessments are used for math progress monitoring. Intervention teams (guidance counselors, principals, curriculum coaches, grade-level teachers, Family Resource and Youth Services Centers representatives, and others) meet monthly to discuss struggling learners in both reading and math. 45
  46. Early Learning Interventions in Practice Kentucky System of Interventions Tiered service delivery/evidence-based instruction. Harrison County Schools Tiers III, II, and I, with the most intensive support in Tier III. Tier III (Intensive Support) DreamBoxwith instruction Moby Math with instruction Number Sense/Structuring (KNP website) Addition (KNP website) Subtraction (KNP website) Multiplication (KNP website) Division (KNP website) Math MATS 46
  47. Early Learning Interventions in Practice Tier II (Small Group/Strategic Support) DreamBox Moby Math Number Sense/Structuring (KNP website) Addition (KNP website) Subtraction (KNP website) Multiplication (KNP website) Division (KNP website) Math MATS Tier I (Core with Differentiation) Addition Strategies (Van de Walle) Subtraction Strategies (Van de Walle) Multiplication Strategies (Van de Walle) Division Strategies (Van de Walle) K-5 Math Resources http://www.k-5mathteachingresources.com/ Free Resources – DreamBox Daily Flashbacks Daily Exit Slips/Formative Assessments with Feedback Math Intervention Support Site http://www.solonschools.org/mr/Index.asp Math Graphic Organizers (i.e. Frayer Model) Vocabulary Practice Marilyn Burns Materials
  48. Early Learning Interventions in Practice Kentucky System of Interventions Tiered service delivery/evidence-based instruction. Harrison County Schools Secondary tier service delivery: Tier I: The lowest 20% of students will be identified in reading and math6‒12 and receive Tier I interventions for reading or math. Tier II: Once a student is referred into Tier II services, the Intervention Team (those closely associated with the education of the students) will meet to review student data and determine appropriate interventions to address student needs. Tier III: Once a student is referred into Tier III services, the Intervention Team will meet to review student data and determine appropriate interventions to address student needs. 48
  49. Early Learning Interventions in Practice Kentucky System of Interventions Fidelity of implementation Harrison County Schools Fidelity Check Form 49
  50. Early Learning Interventions in Practice Kentucky System of Interventions Family involvement Harrison County Schools RtI parent brochure, face-to-face meetings, Pre-K College and Career Readiness Nights (two per year, elementary, middle school, and high school principal participation), RtI and Tier Change Letters “I had no idea that you could begin helping your child think about college when they are in preschool! Tonight opened my eyes to what I need to watch for to help my child be successful!” ―Parent after Pre-K CCR Night in 2012 50
  51. Early Learning Interventions in Practice Kentucky System of Interventions Family involvement Harrison County Schools Grade-level meetings (K‒5) and vertical teaming (6‒12) built into all schools’ PD plans for 6 hours of high-quality PD. Grade-level RtI meetings once a month in each school. District grade-level RtI meetings conducted four times per year to monitor RtI practices for consistency, validity, and usability. Attendance by all school principals, RtI coordinators, and counselors for 6 hours of EILA credit. 51
  52. Early Learning Interventions in Practice Kentucky System of Interventions Accelerated learning MAP scores, common assessments, primary talent pool activities, formative teacher data, progress monitor. Harrison County Schools We administer the Pre-K SCREENS (all pre-K serviced by Harrison County Schools and private schools) and K BRIGANCE SCREENS (all students). These readiness scores are analyzed in conjunction with MAP fall testing scores to determine student needs, in terms of both support and acceleration. 52
  53. Early Learning Interventions in Practice Risks Making sure children are not “caught in the cracks.” Academically – meshing concepts of intervention with EPAS benchmarking. Tier I does have measurable differences in instruction from regular classroom instruction – be vigilant. Rewards Communication amongst grade levels “one heartbeat.” Parents become learning partners and active interventionists from the BEGINNING of their child’s educational career. We (practitioners) are more conscious of what students need to succeed throughout their journey! 53
  54. Time for Audience Q&A

    Lydotta Taylor Alliance Lead, REL Appalachia
  55. Tracking and Monitoring Student Interventions: Infinite Campus (IC) Intervention Tab

    April Pieper Academic Program ManagerKentucky Department of Education
  56. Legislative Overview Kentucky Revised Statutes (KRS) 158.305. Content areas required: Reading, Writing, Math, Behavior. Grades: K‒3. Targeted population: Any student not meeting benchmarks. KRS 158.6453. Content areas required: Reading, Math. Grades: 3‒8. Targeted population: Any student with identified deficiencies or strengths.
  57. Legislative Overview KRS 158.6459. Content areas required: Reading, Writing, Math. Grades: 8–12. Targeted population: Any student who does not meet college readiness benchmarks. 704 Kentucky Administrative Regulations 3:305. Content areas required: Reading, English (Writing), Math. Grade: 12. Targeted population: Any student who does not meet college readiness benchmarks on the ACT.
  58. College Readiness Benchmarks for Kentucky Students ACT Benchmark Score *22 for college algebra, 27 for college calculus Source: Kentucky Department of Education Infinite Campus.
  59. Intervention Tracking Requirements 2014‒2015 Required use of the Intervention Tab in IC: All senior students failing to meet ACT benchmarks. All third-year Needs Improvement Schools (novice students). All Extended School Services (ESS) students. All Read to Achieve students (grant, K‒3). All Mathematics Achievement Fund students (grant, K‒3).
  60. Intervention Tab Source: Kentucky Department of Education Infinite Campus.
  61. Intervention Tab Source: Kentucky Department of Education Infinite Campus.
  62. Intervention Tab Source: Kentucky Department of Education Infinite Campus.
  63. Intervention Tab Source: Kentucky Department of Education Infinite Campus.
  64. Intervention Tab Source: Kentucky Department of Education Infinite Campus.
  65. Questions? April PieperAcademic Program ManagerKentucky Department of Education april.pieper@education.ky.gov502-564-4970 ext. 4519
  66. Lunch

  67. It’s Not Too Late: High School Interventions for Struggling Students

    Michael Flory Research Scientist, CNA
  68. High School Interventions Can Matter, Too Many students come to high school unprepared for high school success. Poor attendance, excessive disciplinary actions, low EXPLORE scores, bad grades. Other students who are on track or nearly on track need supports throughout high school to get them ready for college and careers. Goals for this session are to: Introduce frameworks for organizing college and career readiness strategies. Describe resources for developing effective high school interventions. Discuss research about specific grade 12 interventions in Kentucky and nationally.
  69. Organizing College and Career Readiness Initiatives Available at http://www.betterhighschools.org/CCR/resources.asp Helps frame, synthesize, and make sense of various CCR initiatives. Categories for initiatives focus on high school but span P‒20 systems. Identifies 3 strands: Goals and Expectations for College and Careers―content. Pathways and Supports for College and Career Preparation—instruction, student experiences, and system-level resources. Outcomes and Measures for College and Career Success—formative and summative data schools can use to guide decisions. Many other planning and instructional resources are available from National High School Center.
  70. Sample Organizer Strand
  71. Practices for Helping Students Navigate Paths to College Available from http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/publications_reviews.aspx Intended to help schools and districts develop practices to increase access to higher education. Based on rigorous, experimental research and expert opinion. Includes 5 recommendations and checklists of practices.
  72. Practice Guide Recommendations 5 research-based recommendations, each with specific strategies: Offer courses and curricula that prepare students for college-level work, and ensure that students understand what constitutes a college-ready curriculum by grade 9. Use assessment measures throughout high school so students are aware of how prepared they are for college, and assist them in overcoming deficiencies as they are identified. Surround students with adults and peers who build and support their college-going aspirations. Engage and assist students in completing critical steps for college entry. Increase families’ financial awareness, and help students apply for financial aid. Tierney, W. G., Bailey, T., Constantine, J., Finkelstein, N., & Hurd, N. F. (2009). Helping students navigate the path to college: What high schools can do (Practice Guide, NCEE #2009-4066). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Depart­ment of Education.
  73. It Is Possible to Intervene as Late as Grade 12 Practice guide recommendations 2, 4, and 5 apply in grade 12. Use data (e.g., ACT) to inform interventions and help students apply for college and aid. College and career readiness is not always an academic issue. Sometimes a matter of aspirations, expectations, steps for college entry. Two recent experiments showed effects of simplifying college applications: Help fill out FAFSA (providing FAFSA info did not increase college enrollment rates) (Bettinger, 2009). Offer coaching to help students apply to college, and process and pay for applications (Carrell, 2013). Bettinger, E. P., Long, B. T., Oreopoulos, P., & Sanbonmatsu, L. (2009, September). Role of simplification and information in college decisions: Results from the H&R Block FAFSA experiment (NBER Working Paper No. 15361). Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research. Carrell, S.E., & Sacerdote, B. (2013, May). Late interventions matter too: The case of college coaching New Hampshire (NBER Working Paper No. 19031). Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.
  74. Kentucky’s Grade 12 College Transition Courses Transition courses are one specific CCR intervention High school classes taught in grade 12 to help students achieve college readiness in specific content areas. Should reduce the need for developmental education once students reach college. Kentucky, California, Florida, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia offer versions of college transition courses (SREB, 2011). Vary in students targeted; whether course is required or voluntary; content, format, and availability of professional development. States are beginning to track participation in transition courses. There is no evidence to date about the effectiveness of such courses. Southern Regional Education Board (SREB). (2011). State College and Career Readiness Initiative: Statewide transitional courses for college readiness. Atlanta, GA: Author. http://publications.sreb.org/2011/11E03_Trans%20Crs_Sum.pdf
  75. Transition Courses in Kentucky Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) made transition course curricula available for math in 2010/11 and for reading in 2011/12. Schools can chose curricula from multiple developers: KDE. Colleges and universities. Locally developed. Many schools have partnered with universities to develop transition courses.
  76. Student Levels of College Readiness Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE) set benchmarks for college readiness using students’ grade 11 scores on ACT. Score of 19 or above on math. Score of 20 or above on reading. Study grouped students into three categories of college readiness based on their scores: “Meeting benchmarks”—score at or above subject benchmark. “Approaching benchmarks”—score 1 to 3 points below benchmark. KDE recommends college preparatory transition courses for students in this group. “Below benchmarks”—score 4 or more points below benchmark.
  77. REL Appalachia Study Based on discussion with superintendents, we examined participation and pass rates in transition courses statewide: How many students enroll in these courses? Which students? Used 2011/12 academic year enrollment data from KDE. No data available for college readiness of these students at time of study.
  78. Few Schools Statewide Offered College Transition Courses Source: Authors’ calculations based on 2011/12 academic year data from KDE (2013).
  79. More Students “Approaching Benchmarks” in Math 38% of students “approaching benchmarks” in math. 21% of students “approaching benchmarks” in reading. Source: Authors’ calculations based on 2011/12 academic year data from KDE (2013).
  80. Less Than 30% of Recommended Students Took Math “Approaching benchmarks” in math―28% took transition courses. “Below benchmarks” in math―27% took transition courses. “Approaching benchmarks” in reading―8% took transition courses. Source: Authors’ calculations based on 2011/12 academic year data from KDE (2013).
  81. Passing Rates in College Transition Courses Were High Statewide, passing rates for both math and reading transition courses were above 90% for students “approaching benchmarks.” There was no college readiness data available for this cohort (e.g., COMPASS, KYOTE) to evaluate effectiveness of courses. The full report, Participation and Pass Rates for College Transition Courses in Kentucky, by Christine Mokher, is available online: http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs
  82. Study Conclusions Few students approaching ACT benchmarks received this specific targeted intervention. Many students who are not approaching benchmarks enroll in transition courses. These findings may impact how transition courses are offered: Content, instructional practices, and course format. There is no conclusion about the effectiveness of transition courses.
  83. Questions? Michael Flory, Research Scientist REL Appalachia florym@cna.org
  84. Small Group Activity

    Lydotta Taylor Alliance Lead, REL Appalachia
  85. Discussion Questions What are the top three challenges you face with ensuring students are college or career ready? What obstacles could you face when implementing the strategies discussed today? Who could be your ally in supporting implementation of the strategies you learned today?
  86. High School Interventions in Practice

    Christy Coulter Principal, Bullitt Central High School Shepherdsville, Kentucky
  87. Bullitt County Board Policy 08.113 CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION: “Effective with the graduating class of 2015, students must meet college or career readiness standards as adopted by the Kentucky Board of Education in order to graduate. Principals will disseminate these readiness standards to students through the guidance program and inclusion in student handbooks and in the Individual Learning Plan (ILP). Exceptions to this requirement shall be made for students with identified learning disabilities as determined by the Admissions and Release committee.”
  88. Data Monitoring – ACT Assessments We use an Excel document. Enter Explore, Plan, ACT (Aspire) scores. Overall score: 3, 2, 1, 0 We are able to sort, schedule, and target interventions. 3s met all three benchmarks and are on track. 2s met two and have one deficiency in math. This allows for grouping and identification.
  89. Data Monitoring – ASVAB Use Excel document and code your students with work keys, ASVAB, career major, status. ASVAB 50. Work Keys―4 in RFI, R, AP. Enter 3, 2, 1, 0 for academic standing. Easily target/sort for interventions. 3s met all three benchmarks and are on track. 2s met two and have one deficiency in math. This allows for grouping and identification.
  90. CCR Data Monitoring Tool College Readiness Career Readiness P - PassedF - Taken b FailedNS - No Score
  91. Data Monitoring
  92. Data Monitoring We have 50 seniors with a score of 2, only missing math. Our responses include: Counseling. Conference with math professional learning community (PLC) team and teacher. Determine gaps in instruction―what skill needs mastery? Provide online tutorials and support. Invite and direct to afterschool learning labs. Talk with parents. Send a letter home. Double block. Pull-out programs. Teach, Re-teach, Practice, Re-teach.
  93. Data-Driven Scheduling No connection between career fairs, counseling, ILPs and selecting courses! Tested a sample of students and were shocked with the results. Most parents don’t really get the input they would like.
  94. Data-Driven Scheduling Merge the scheduling selection sheet with the CCR data tool. Name, academic score (3, 2, 1, 0), and career pathway are noted on the scheduling selection sheet. Critical to have the data tied to class placement. Students with 1s and 0s need intervention, remediation, and support. Students with 3s and 2s need acceleration.
  95. Career Readiness Monitoring One on five scheduling:
  96. Career Readiness Monitoring Career seminar is required. Taught by elective teachers. Work keys unit, test, and ILP are embedded in the course. Taught in grade 9 and again in grade 12 for non-completers. Partner career seminar with the entry-level pathway class: FCS―Life Skills. Govt./Public Safety―JROTC 1. Business―Computer Tech. Agriculture―Principles of Ag. Health Science―Health & Wellness. College Credit Advanced Placement―AP Geography.
  97. From Exploring to Preparatory Through data monitoring and scheduling work, all Freshmen are “exploring” in a career pathway. Through data monitoring and scheduling alignment, all Sophomores and Juniors are preparatory and qualify to take a Kentucky Occupational Skills Standards Assessment (KOSSA) (588 total). Accounting 45, Administrative Support 91, Agriculture Education 2, Ag Power 44, Ag Business 28, Business Management 80, Culinary 71, Child Care 83, Finance 45, Horticulture 69, Production Livestock 32.
  98. Tiered Curriculum in English and Math (Scheduling) Meet the students’ needs with targeted instruction. Scores and data marks are set for all grades and levels for English and Math placement. 3 data points used for placement for senior math: (ACT ≥22) calculus, AP, dual credit, JCTC. (ACT 19‒21) algebra III. (ACT 17‒18) Tier 2. (ACT 15‒16) Tier 1. 3 data points used for placement for grade 9 English: (≥230 MAP, teacher recommendation, Explore ≥15) Honors English. (229‒220 MAP, teacher recommendation, Explore 13‒14) English I. (≤219 Map, teacher recommendation, Explore ≤12) English R.
  99. Counselors Hand-Schedule English and Math CCR Report and MAP scores are all aligned and sorted. Counselors mass schedule 100 students who qualify and should be placed in Honors English. “This discipline student is in the wrong class.” Response: “NO; the data says he is capable of honors level.” “Homecoming queen can’t be in the English R class, this is a mistake.” “Look for pretenders and MEET THE THEIR NEEDS!” CCR tool has assisted us in narrowing the testing pool for ASVAB. CCR tool helps determine COMPASS and KYOTE remediation and testing needs.
  100. PLC Work Is the Key If the core work is on target, limited remediation will be needed. Our instruction and the “level of implementation” are the keys to improved results. Common planning for all areas: English, Math, Science, Social Studies, Vocational by pathway. Time to plan, time to assess, time to evaluate results, plan for re-teach. When we master the exact skill and can monitor the exact skill, student scores will soar.
  101. Questions? Christy Coulter Principal, Bullitt Central High School Shepherdsville, Kentucky Christy.coulter@bullitt.kyschools.us
  102. High School Interventions in Practice

    Tim Schlosser Principal, Franklin-Simpson High School Franklin, Kentucky
  103. Focus on Our Goals Culture of college and career readiness: Starts DAY ONE. Building speaks VOLUMES. All stakeholders know the MISSION STATEMENT.
  104. Focus on Our Goals
  105. Spirit in Our School Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports School-wide focus on the positive. Behavior matrix – changes for the better!
  106. Spirit in Our School Behavior Referrals Dropped Referrals Dropped from 2229 to 969
  107. Spirit in Our School
  108. Honor in Our Actions Posters of students’ accomplishments everywhere. Banners displayed. Student of the Week. Rewards for students.
  109. Honor in Our Actions
  110. Growth in State/Regional Rankings Moved from 128th to 12th of all Kentucky high schools. Moved from 11th to 1st in region. Moved from 45th percentile to 3rd percentile of all Kentucky high schools.
  111. Accountability Growth in Year 1
  112. Professional Learning Communities Common assessments every 4 weeks on KCAS. Assessments analyzed for standards mastery. Instructional strategies adjusted for re-teaching/re-grouping.
  113. Guided Planning Weekly focus on: Learning targets. Kentucky Core Academic Standards. High-yield instructional strategies. Assessments are rigorous and aligned to Kentucky Core Academic Standards. Assessments are used to inform future instruction. This year’s focus: 20 Literacy Strategies to Meet the Common Core
  114. Daily Walkthroughs and Walkthrough Schedules
  115. Google Docs for Gathering Data
  116. List of Walkthroughs by PGES Standard
  117. List of Walkthroughs by Teacher or Date
  118. Group Data by Category Needed
  119. Data Gathered on Number of Walkthroughs Completed
  120. Other Reports on Areas of Focus
  121. Success for ALL
  122. Systems for Continuous Improvement Administrative monitoring for continuous improvement Professional development LDC/MDC modules PGES for effective instruction PLCs Non-academic data EOC GAP student monitoring Daily walkthroughs Weekly guided planning Weekly overviews Academic time for CCR
  123. Communication Plan
  124. Student Monitoring Plan
  125. Time for Audience Q&A

    Lydotta Taylor Alliance Lead, REL Appalachia
  126. Wrap-Up and Next StepsStakeholder Feedback Survey

    Justin BaerDirector, REL Appalachia