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Understanding sensory-motor integration

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Understanding sensory-motor integration

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Understanding sensory-motor integration

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Presentation Transcript

  1. Understanding sensory-motor integration

  2. ORGANIZATION OF SENSORY SYSTEMS: General perspectives • Sensori-motor integration • External senses • Localize/Detect and monitor change • Less sensitive to unchanging stimuli • Tuned…sense modes

  3. Organization of sensory systems • Sense organs • Receptors-specificity and transduction • Receptive fields- and limitations • coding- labeled lines vs pattern coding • Adaptation and suppression • Neural relays and recoding • Intra-modality sensory Convergence • Cortical representation/ perception • Sensory subsystems

  4. The Visual System

  5. Tracing the ccts of vision

  6. Organization of sensory systems • Sense organs • Receptors-specificity and transduction • Receptive fields- and limitations • Adaptation and suppression • coding- labeled lines vs pattern coding • Neural relays and recoding • Intra-modality sensory Convergence • Cortical representation/ perception • Sensory subsystems

  7. The organ of vision

  8. The eye is like an SLR camera

  9. Like a camera • Lens-focus • Iris-light control (aperture) • Photoreceptors- transduction of light info (Light sensitive film)

  10. The lens-a small point of interest

  11. Like a camera-lens is curved • Upside-down and inverted

  12. Like a camera- Control of eye movement also critical

  13. Eye movement- 3 major types of movement that can affect vision Pursuit/tracking Saccades vergence

  14. Organization of sensory systems • Sense organs • Receptors-specificity and transduction • Receptive fields- and limitations • Adaptation and suppression • coding- labeled lines vs pattern coding • Intra-modality sensory Convergence • Neural relays and recoding • Cortical representation/ perception • Sensory subsystems

  15. Sensitivity and Limitations of the visual system: visible light spectrum

  16. Organization of sensory systems • Sense organs • Receptors-specificity and transduction • Receptive fields and limitations • Adaptation and suppression • coding- labeled lines vs pattern coding • Intra-modality sensory Convergence • Neural relays and recoding • Sensory subsystems • Cortical representation/ perception

  17. The Iris • Controls light exposure

  18. Organization of sensory systems • Sense organs • Receptors-specificity and transduction • Receptive fields- and limitations • Adaptation and suppression • coding- labeled lines vs pattern coding • Intra-modality sensory Convergence • Neural relays and recoding • Sensory subsystems • Cortical representation/ perception

  19. The retina-photoreceptive tissue

  20. Visual field and retino-topic organization

  21. More on the retina

  22. Photoreceptors

  23. Rods and Cones

  24. Receptive fields and Coding RODS- dark/low illumination sensitive to movement peripheral vision CONES- High illumination sensitive to color foveal vision

  25. ROD CONE DISTRIBUTION

  26. FOVEA

  27. FOVEA and optic disc/blind spot

  28. Foveal acuity

  29. Retinal circuitry

  30. NOTE: • Light passes through ganglion cell layer, and bipolar cell layer before striking photoreceptors ( light transparent). • Activation of photoreceptor activats cct in reverse direction.

  31. What accounts for Foveal acuity

  32. Accounting for Foveal Accuity1. Cone properties 2. Circuitry

  33. Color Coding in cones

  34. The Trichromatic Theory of color

  35. Receptive fields of Ganglion cells

  36. Set up for sensory evoked recording

  37. Sensory convergence

  38. Retinal photoreceptors corresponding to Ganglion cell receptive fields

  39. Purpose of ganglion cell receptive fields?

  40. Lateral inhibition?

  41. Lateral inhibition

  42. Overlapping receptive fields contribute to lateral inhibition The center of one field may be the surround of another

  43. Retina ganglion cell axons coalesce