Download
don klimchuk p eng city of vancouver engineering services n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Don Klimchuk, P. Eng. City of Vancouver Engineering Services PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Don Klimchuk, P. Eng. City of Vancouver Engineering Services

Don Klimchuk, P. Eng. City of Vancouver Engineering Services

309 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Don Klimchuk, P. Eng. City of Vancouver Engineering Services

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Don Klimchuk, P. Eng.City of VancouverEngineering Services Session #78 Pro Walk / Pro Bike Conference Victoria, BC September 10th, 2004

  2. Vancouver & Greater Vancouver Area

  3. Downtown Vancouver and False Creek

  4. Greenway Routes Linear public corridors for pedestrians & cyclists that connect parks, nature reserves, cultural features, historic sites, neighbourhoods and retail areas.

  5. Bicycle Routes

  6. Transit Routes

  7. Mode Splits

  8. Transportation Plans • City of Vancouver Transportation Plan(1997) • Downtown Transportation Plan (2002)

  9. 3 Main Financing Methods 1. Capital Budgets 2. New Developments 3. Cost-Sharing Partnerships

  10. 1. Capital Budget - Overview • About $4M a year directly for Pedestrians and Bicycles: • New Sidewalks, • Sidewalk Reconstruction, • Curb Ramp Program, • Bicycle Network, • Beautification / Street Trees, • Pedestrian Structures, • Greenways, and • Pedestrian Signals. 50% increase in funding since Completion of 1997 Transportation Plan.

  11. 1. Capital Budget – Local Improvements “Local Improvements” – capital improvement (sidewalk, curb, pavement, etc.) that specially benefits adjacent properties, with a portion of the cost recovered by a special tax on those properties. 2004 Review • Changes made to expedite completion of sidewalk network. • Priority order: • transit routes • arterial streets • pedestrian collector routes • higher density streets • local residential streets

  12. 1. Capital Budget – Local Improvements 2004 Review (continued) • Targets set for completion of sidewalk: • on both sides of all transit routes by 2007 (date that all transit • routes will have wheel chair access), and • on both sides of all arterial streets by 2009. Changes made to cost-sharing bylaws: PO = Property Owner

  13. 2. New Developments - Building Lines “Building Lines” - establish where the legal boundary of a street (i.e. property line) will be after a planned future widening • only landscaping and temporary • structures permitted between existing • property line and building line • when transportation project • proceeds, only the needed land is • purchased (i.e. no building purchase, • demolition, etc.) • implemented beginning in the 1930’s • for major road widening projects

  14. 2. New Developments - Building Lines (cont’d) • Review – using building lines to support wider sidewalks, bike lanes and transit priority

  15. 2. New Developments - Building Lines (cont’d) • Review (continued) • Downtown Transportation Plan reviewing pedestrian related building • lines on Davie St.

  16. 2. New Developments – Zoning and Development Policy • Commercial Zoning • recently commercial zoning (C2) was amended to require new buildings • to be set back a minimum of 2’ from the property line • > effectively widens • the sidewalk (can • walk along property • line) • > provides strip for • complimentary • commercial uses • such as small • sidewalk cafes, • merchandise • displays, sandwich • board signs, etc.

  17. 2. New Developments – Zoning and Development Policy (cont’d) • Development Streetscape Policies • Council policies for specific high-density residential development areas • set detailed streetscape design standards and building setbacks • > sidewalk and boulevard treatment, • tree species and locations, tree • grates, pedestrian lighting, benches, • etc. • > building setbacks of 6’ to 12’ (allows • second row of ‘street’ trees) > deposit for estimated costs collected at time permits issued

  18. 2. New Developments – Zoning and Development Policy (cont’d) • Development Weather Protection Guidelines • Zoning guidelines in most commercial areas require the provision of • awnings or canopies: • > “The ground floor of • arterial frontages should • have a continuous, • architecturally integrated • weather protection and • signage system. This may • be composed of glass and • steel, canvas or vinyl, but • should be designed as part • of the building and function • principally as weather • protection.”

  19. 2. New Developments – Zoning and Development Policy (cont’d) • Development Cost Levies (DCLs) for Transportation • Implemented as part of the City’s recent • Financing Growth review: • > 2-year long public process for • implementing new city-wide • development charges • Charge against new development to pay • part of the capital costs generated by • residential, industrial and commercial • growth: • > $6 per square foot, except for • industrial ($2 per square foot) • > collected at the building permit stage • > governed by provincial legislation

  20. 2. New Developments – Zoning and Development Policy (cont’d) • Development Cost Levies for Transportation (cont’d) • Transportation projects receive 22% of total DCL revenues: • Estimated • Project Annual Rev. • Bikeways $ 180,000 • Greenways $ 120,000 • Arterial Improvements $ 540,000 • Downtown Streetcar $ 640,000 • Neighbourhood Centres $ 160,000 • Major Sustainable Projects $ 360,000 • Total $2,000,000

  21. 2. New Developments – Zoning and Development Policy (cont’d) • Development Cost Levies for Transportation (cont’d) • Based on estimated transportation growth costs for the next 25 years: • > Total of $230 million in project costs • > About 50% assumed to be growth related • > Funding from other sources (senior • government, property owners, etc.) • netted out to come up with an estimate • of $110 million for transportation growth • related projects • > 22% allocation for transportation was derived by taking the above • transportation cost, and dividing it by the total for all eligible • categories (includes parks, replacement housing and childcare • facilities).

  22. 2. New Developments – Zoning and Development Policy (cont’d) • Community Amenity Contributions (CACs) • Growth charge for local amenities in a community where a rezoning • (increase in density) has occurred • > condition of rezoning approval • > City receives a portion of the lift in land value • > Initially, all CACs were negotiated with • developers on a case by case basis • > Financing Growth review set a flat rate • ($3/ sq. ft.) for most re-zonings; only • “non-standard” re-zonings (large sites and • downtown sites) negotiated • > Can be used for a wide variety of services • > Types of amenities, including transportation improvements (if any), • are determined through rezoning public consultation process

  23. 2. New Developments – Zoning and Development Policy (cont’d) • Community Amenity Contributions (CACs) • Guidelines: • Serve the site and/or community in which the rezoning occurs; • 2. Be growth-related, or meet past deficiencies or other community priorities; • 3. Be identified through: • a) An evaluation of the full range of City services and of the level of • existing City amenities in the area, and • b) Public input obtained during the rezoning, and through community • plans or Visions, and/or city-wide plans and policies; and • 4. Operationally viable and within City servicing standards; and • 5. Approved by City Council as a Community Amenity Contribution.

  24. 2. New Developments – Zoning and Development Policy (cont’d) • Servicing Agreements • Large re-zonings typically require a Servicing Agreement that includes • transportation upgrades (i.e. dedication of new streets, walkways, • bike lanes, pedestrian signals, etc.) needed to service the development. • A Public Realm Plan provides details of sidewalk treatments, street • furniture, lighting type and location, etc. • > re-zoning condition • > newly dedicated streets and rights-of-way are designed and • installed by the developer at the time each site is serviced • > developer is also responsible for a 2-year warranty period, in which • they must maintain all components • > the City takes over maintenance after the warranty period; to help • offset costs of maintenance and repair, developers are typically • asked to provide a 10% oversupply of non-standard items such as • pavers

  25. 2. New Developments – Zoning and Development Policy (cont’d) • Servicing Agreements – examples Public Realm Plan (Great Northern Way Lands) New waterfront walkway (Coal Harbour)

  26. 2. New Developments – Zoning and Development Policy (cont’d) • Concord “Green Links” (Parking Pay-in-Lieu) • >Part of a 1990 parking agreement for the • re-zoning and development of the former • Expo 86 site • > Developer agreed to provide payment for • improved transit, walking and cycling • connections to the downtown, in exchange • for reduced underground parking • requirements (870 stalls x $8500/stall = • $7.4M) • > Paid in full before the issuance of the first • occupancy permit for each development site • > About $2M received to date, with balance phased in between now and 2013

  27. 2. New Developments – Zoning and Development Policy (cont’d) • By-law Requirements for Off-Street Amenities • Parking By-law • Includes requirements relating to the amount, location, and design of bicycle parking, including specifications governing enclosures, racks, security and clothing lockers • Building By-law • Includes corresponding requirements for showers and change rooms

  28. 3. Cost-sharing Partnerships • Regional Government (TransLink) • “TransLink” – Greater Vancouver Transportation • Authority; formed in 1999 (via Provincial legislation) to • deliver regional transportation services. • Sources of revenue include: • transit fares • gasoline taxes • sales tax on paid parking • residential & commercial property taxes • BC Hydro (electric utility) levy

  29. 3. Cost-sharing Partnerships (cont’d) • Regional Government (TransLink) (cont’d) • Minor Capital Program ($3.9 million/year - Vancouver) • 50% cost-sharing provided for • safety and “people-moving” • improvements to the region’s • Major Road Network (MRN) • Eligible projects include • pedestrian crossing • improvements (signals, corner • bulges, etc.) and bike routes/ • crossings on the MRN • Discussions between TransLink and municipalities, on increased flexibility to fund more walking and cycling projects, are scheduled for this fall

  30. 3. Cost-sharing Partnerships (cont’d) • Regional Government (TransLink) (cont’d) • Bicycle Infrastructure Program (approx. $900,000/year - Vancouver) • 50% cost-sharing for bicycle route construction • covered in Session 39 (Sept. 9th) – Role of GVTA Bicycle Programs for the Vancouver Region

  31. 3. Cost-sharing Partnerships (cont’d) • Provincial Government • Cycling Network Program (1995 – 2001) • Contributed over $1M towards $4M total in bicycle route expansion projects • Part of “conditional” grants program for BC municipalities • Eliminated as part of overall provincial cutbacks • Program was initiated after lobbying by senior City staff • City has requested provincial government to restore funding

  32. 3. Cost-sharing Partnerships (cont’d) • Provincial Government (cont’d) • 2) Rapid Transit Project Integration Funds • Expo SkyTrain Line • BC Parkway Greenway • - linear walking and cycling path • located under the SkyTrain • guideway • - initially sponsored by 7-11 stores • Millennium SkyTrain Line • Municipal Integration Fund • - local amenities negotiated • as part of access agreement • to City streets and rights-of-way • - included a new greenway and • plazas

  33. 3. Cost-sharing Partnerships (cont’d) • Federal Government • Opportunities Envelope Fund • Up to 50% cost sharing for reducing greenhouse gas emissions • $ 180 million nationally over 3 years • Vancouver has submitted a “Gold Medal Transportation Alternatives” application through the provincial governments. Includes: • > $5.3 million for walking and cycling infrastructure in the downtown • > $1 million for supporting safe walking and biking routes to school • Application supports City’s draft • Community Climate Change • Action Plan (Vancouver’s • contribution towards meeting • Kyoto targets)

  34. 3. Cost-sharing Partnerships (cont’d) • Federal Government (cont’d) • 2) Urban Transportation Showcase Program • Up to one-third federal cost sharing for projects that demonstrate, evaluate and promote transportation greenhouse gas reductions • TransLink and Greater Vancouver • Application approved: • > $16.5 million in total, with $5.5 • million in federal funding • > Vancouverprojects includes: • - Central Valley Greenway • ($6.4 million total) • - SkyTrain Station Precinct • Improvements ($3 million • total - improved sidewalks, • lighting, street furniture, • bus shelters, bicycle lockers, traffic calming, signals at 3 stations)

  35. 3. Cost-sharing Partnerships (cont’d) • Federal Government (cont’d) • Vancouver Agreement (Downtown Eastside Revitalization) • Part of commitment by the federal government, the provincial government and the City of Vancouver to support sustainable economic, social and community development • Funding has included streetscape improvements (greenway design and construction, pedestrian lighting, etc. • 4) Canada/BC Infrastructure Program • Current program began in 2000 (5-year program) • covers a variety of hard and soft infrastructure projects • costs shared equally between federal, provincial and local governments (about $800M in total) • Some bicycle routes funded in previous programs

  36. 3. Cost-sharing Partnerships (cont’d) • Private Sector • Street Furniture and Amenities Program • City partnership (2002 agreement) with Viacom / JC Decaux, for the provision and maintenance of a coordinated suite of street furniture, at no cost to the City • New infrastructure provided in exchange for exclusive rights for bus shelter advertising • Higher service levels and improved aesthetic quality than previously provided • Includes bus shelters, benches, litter receptacles, news paper box racks, bike racks and pedestrian signage/maps • 10% of advertising space made available for community oriented advertising, free of charge • Projected city benefit of $135 million over a twenty year term, including guaranteed revenue sharing of $1.5 million/year (pays for administration, litter receptacle emptying, etc.

  37. 3. Cost-sharing Partnerships (cont’d) • Residents • Green Streets Program • Offers residents an opportunity to become • volunteer street gardeners in their • neighbourhood by sponsoring a traffic • circle or corner bulge garden • Volunteers can tend either city supplied or their • own plantings • City support includes bi-annual newsletter, a • Gardener’s Information website, free advice • from a certified Master Gardener and an annual • Green Streets Garden Party

  38. 3. Cost-sharing Partnerships (cont’d) • Non-Governmental Organizations • Better Environmentally Sound Transportation (BEST) • Promotes local sustainable • transportation and land-use • planning, and pedestrian, • cycling and transit-oriented • neighbourhoods • With the support of a $1 million • award from VanCity Credit Union, • BEST is helping to complete the • Central Valley Greenway • Partnership with TransLink, the • GVRD and the Cities of • Vancouver, Burnaby • and New Westminster

  39. Conclusions • As a first step, develop policies and detailed plans to act on • Use outside funding to stretch capital dollars • Lobby senior governments for cost-sharing programs • Look for win-win opportunities with developers, the private sector and your community members

  40. Don Klimchuk, P. Eng. Strategic Transportation Planning Branch, Engineering Services, City of Vancouver Phone: 604-873-7345 Email: don_klimchuk@city.vancouver.bc.ca