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OPERATE BASIC SECURITY EQUIPMENT PowerPoint Presentation
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OPERATE BASIC SECURITY EQUIPMENT

OPERATE BASIC SECURITY EQUIPMENT

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OPERATE BASIC SECURITY EQUIPMENT

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  1. D1.HSS.CL4.03 OPERATE BASIC SECURITY EQUIPMENT

  2. Operate basic security equipment Performance Criteria for this Element are: • Identify and access security equipment to complete designated tasks in accordance with assignment instructions and organizational requirements • Perform pre-operational checks to equipment • Identify, rectify or replace faulty and damaged equipment • Identify and notify the need for training to the appropriate person

  3. Assessment Assessment for this unit may include: • Oral questions • Written questions • Work projects • Workplace observation of practical skills • Practical exercises • Formal report from employer or supervisor

  4. Operate basic security equipment This Unit comprises four Elements: 1 Select and prepare security equipment for use 2 Operate security equipment 3 Maintain security equipment and resources

  5. Identify and access security equipment Security equipment used: • Must be selected for the individual job to be done • Is supplied by the employer • May be supplemented by personal items: • To reflect individual preferences • If approved by management

  6. Identify and access security equipment Security equipment will vary between venues based on: • Layout • Location • Trade • Trading hours • Neighboring business (Continued)

  7. Identify and access security equipment • Customer type and profiles • Previous history • Local and emerging trends impacting security • Numbers of staff • Budget • Guest needs and expectations regarding security • Personal items used by security staff

  8. Identify and access security equipment Comms equipment is required by Security staff: • So management can communicate with staff • To enable communication in event of emergency • To allow staff to talk with each other • So venue can communicate with guests • To communicate with emergency services

  9. Identify and access security equipment Commonly used comms equipment: • Hand-held radios • Comms set with headset • Landline phones • Cell phones • Pagers • PA systems • Megaphones

  10. Identify and access security equipment ‘Security’ requires office equipment to support its activities: • An office with desks, chairs and cupboards • Computers – with internet connection • Printer and photocopier • Fax machines • White boards • TV monitor • Filing cabinets

  11. Identify and access security equipment Security staff may also use vehicles: • Cars • Vans • Motorcycles • Bicycles

  12. Identify and access security equipment Fire fighting equipment: • Extinguishers: • Water; foam; powder; carbon dioxide • Reels and hoses • Fire blankets • Sand buckets

  13. Identify and access security equipment In relation to fire-fighting equipment: • Obtain in-house training • Know the differences between extinguishers, what they are used for and how to operate them • Know locations of: • Hoses and reels • Sand buckets • Fire blankets

  14. Identify and access security equipment Fire alarms: • Know the different ‘stages’ of alarms – what they sound like and what they mean • Treat all alarms seriously • Never turn off an alarm until specifically instructed to do so

  15. Identify and access security equipment Shut off valves: • Used in the event of an emergency to: • Turn off electricity • Turn off water • Turn off gas

  16. Identify and access security equipment Intruder alarms: • May be activated by pressure pad, beam, sensor or a contact (switch) • May give audible (siren) or visual (flashing light) warning – or both • All alerts or alarms MUST be investigated

  17. Identify and access security equipment Flashlights (torches): • Must know where they are stored, how to use and recharge them, how long they will last • An item very much influenced by personal preference • Must be strong and powerful • Should have a strobe SOS feature

  18. Identify and access security equipment Other security items include: • Warning signs • Tape • Witches hats - cones

  19. Identify and access security equipment Cameras: • Some issue these to Security staff, some do not • Used to: • Capture evidence • Deter threats • Record occurrences

  20. Identify and access security equipment ‘Designated tasks’: • Conducting routine security monitoring • Performing crowd control duties • Undertaking screening activities • Checking identification (Continued)

  21. Identify and access security equipment • Escorting people • Controlling access • Controlling and monitoring egress • Working with security documents..

  22. Identify and access security equipment ‘Assignment instructions’: • Instructions from management about work allocated to Security staff • May be in written form • Mostly in verbal form

  23. Identify and access security equipment Written assignment instructions commonly used for: • Special surveillance • Investigations • Escort duties • Special or substantiated threats • Responses based on advice from police • Responses based on risk assessment results and findings • Large events

  24. Identify and access security equipment Assignment instructions will address: • Specific requirements nominated by client • Objectives • Special access requirements which may apply • Time ‘on’ and ‘off’ (Continued)

  25. Identify and access security equipment • Specific work tasks • Integration of tasks with other duties • Resources available to be used • Management for the assignment • Documentation required to be referred to

  26. Perform pre-operational checks Checking of security equipment: • Must occur prior to use of items – no exceptions • Must be completed by all staff – no exceptions • Must be applied to all items – no exceptions

  27. Perform pre-operational checks Pre-operational checks are important because: • All items need to work as intended when used • There is a need to ensure safety of the item • The equipment may save your life or someone else’s • Everyone expects you to have functional equipment • Not having fully functional items may breach Duty of Care

  28. Perform pre-operational checks Never assume an item is fit to use simply because: • Someone else has just handed it in after their shift • There is nothing recorded or documented indicating a problem • It is, or it looks new • The item has never given a problem in the past

  29. Perform pre-operational checks Pre-operational checks can involve: • Checking log books and registers • Reading and referring to manufacturer’s instructions • Using your senses (Continued)

  30. Perform pre-operational checks • Responding to small operational defects • Undertaking basic preventative vehicle maintenance • Performing basic vehicle checks (Continued)

  31. Perform pre-operational checks • Other testing and checking: • Running diagnostics • Testing comms • Weapons • Items are ‘charged’ • OC sprays are ‘full’

  32. Identify, rectify or replace faulty and damaged equipment All faulty or damaged items must be fixed or replaced. Faults or damage can be identified: • As a result of checks • When reported by staff • When flagged by a system

  33. Identify, rectify or replace faulty and damaged equipment Examples of damaged or faulty equipment: • Missing items • Items with flat batteries • Flashlights with blown globes • Items requiring maintenance or service • Item works intermittently • Dangerous item • Not fully operational

  34. Identify, rectify or replace faulty and damaged equipment Where items are damaged or faulty and can be fixed your on-the-job training will: • Explain scope of authority • Indicate time which can be spent • Provide diagnosis and repair or service instruction (Continued)

  35. Identify, rectify or replace faulty and damaged equipment Also note: • Never assume you know what the problem or cause is • Stay within personal scope of authority • Repair requirements (can) differ between similar items of equipment and between models • Never ignore a problem or fault

  36. Identify, rectify or replace faulty and damaged equipment SOP where items cannot be fixed on-the-spot by you: • Tag item as ‘U/S’ • Remove item from service • Complete ‘Maintenance Request’ form • Arrange replacement • Report situation

  37. Identify and notify need for training Security-related training may be required by: • Full-time, part-time and casual staff • New employees, and those with no experience • Staff who have transferred to Security work • Experienced staff from other venues • Contracted staff from external security provider

  38. Identify and notify need for training Security training may be required when: • New equipment is introduced • Breaches of security occur • Established SOPs prove ineffective • New or revised policies and procedures are introduced • New target markets are attending (Continued)

  39. Identify and notify need for training • Opening times change • New attractions are made available in the venue • There has been legal action against the venue • Negative media attention is received (Continued)

  40. Identify and notify need for training • Told by authorities to improve security • Warned by authorities of a new or specific threat • Property layout alters • A special event is planned • A VIP guest is expected

  41. Identify and notify need for training Need for training needs to be communicated (usually in writing) to ‘appropriate person’ who may be: • Owner • Manager • Head office • External security provider (Continued)

  42. Identify and notify need for training • Head of Security • Venue or workplace trainer • Department supervisor • Safety and Welfare committee (or similar) • Equipment manufacturers

  43. Identify and notify need for training Communicating need for security-related training should address the following points: • Numbers of staff • Names • Urgency • Specification of what is required

  44. Summary – Element 1 When selecting and preparing security equipment for use: • Use equipment and items provided by management • Supplement venue items with your own personal gear (where permitted) • Make sure you know all the security gear available and used within the venue • Learn the tasks and responsibilities security is expected to discharge • Match tools and equipment to work to be done (Continued)

  45. Summary – Element 1 • Determine house policies and protocols as they apply to security work and use of security items • Become familiar with workplace assignment instructions • Check equipment, tools, items and systems prior to use • Make sure all faults and damage are rectified or reported • Be alert to the need for training to address use of new equipment and or emerging security situations and threats

  46. Operate security equipment Performance Criteria for this Element are: • Select, use and maintain appropriate personal protective equipment and clothing • Comply with all legislated and internal requirements • Operate security equipment in a safe and controlled manner • Monitor surveillance • Test alarm sectors according to assignment instructions

  47. Select, use and maintain PPE and clothing PPE: • Personal Protective Equipment • Includes clothing • Is provided by employer • May be supplemented by personal items – if allowed

  48. Select, use and maintain PPE and clothing Examples of PPE: • Body armor • Protective shields • Masks • Safety boots (Continued)

  49. Select, use and maintain PPE and clothing • Head protection • Safety glasses • Knee pads • Clip-on neck ties (Continued)

  50. Select, use and maintain PPE and clothing • Duty/utility belt – which can carry: • Holders for pager, flashlight and asp • Pouch for handcuffs, medical and camera • Holster for comms and pistol • Holders for keys, camera, knife and extra clips of ammunition • OC spray carrier