Download
under pressure why plants can t survive without n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Under pressure! Why plants can’t survive without osmosis. PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Under pressure! Why plants can’t survive without osmosis.

Under pressure! Why plants can’t survive without osmosis.

364 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Under pressure! Why plants can’t survive without osmosis.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Under pressure! Why plants can’t survive without osmosis.

  2. Growth and development • (Cell expansion) • Root growth • Flower growth and development • Pollen tube growth • Fruit growth and development • Support • (Turgor pressure) • Maximising leaf surface area for photosynthesis and gas exchange • Holding plant organs in optimum positions • Allowing roots to push down into the soil as they grow • Transport • Movement of water from soil to the Xylem vessels in the root via symplast • Movement of water across the cells of the leaf from Xylem vessels to air spaces within spongy mesophyll layer. • Mass flow of Water carrying solutes in the phloem • Survival and response • Opening and closing stomata via change in shape of guard cells • Rapid changes in position of leaves to alarm predators • Changes in leaf shape as part of a trap mechanism

  3. Growth and development • (Cell expansion) • Root growth • Flower growth and development • Pollen tube growth • Fruit growth and development Birch pollen tubes Longitudinal section of root tip of Maize Wild strawberry Tap root of Dandelion

  4. Support • (Turgor pressure) • Maximising leaf surface area for photosynthesis and gas exchange • Holding plant organs in optimum positions for function • Allowing roots to push down into the soil as they grow Leaves of wood sorrel 3D image of lateral root of Thale cress Bumble bee on pear blossom

  5. Transport • Movement of water from soil to the Xylem vessels in the root • Movement of water across the cells of the leaf from Xylem vessels to air spaces within spongy mesophyll layer • Mass flow of water and solutes in the phloem Transverse section through leaf midrib. Transverse section of part of a sunflower stem showing vascular bundle Root hair cells

  6. Survival and response • Opening and closing stomata via change in shape of guard cells. • Rapid changes in position of leaf to alarm predators • Changes in leaf shape as part of a trap mechanism Mimosa pudica Surface view of guard cells in a leaf of Thale cress (Arabidopsis) Venus fly trap