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Talking for Learning and Life - developing Talk for Writing to fulfil potential across the curriculum

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Talking for Learning and Life - developing Talk for Writing to fulfil potential across the curriculum

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  1. Talking for Learning and Life - developing Talk for Writing to fulfil potential across the curriculum Presented by Pie Corbett supported by Judy Clark & Julia Strong © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  2. Talk for Writing - the story so far.. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  3. Talk for Learning and life • Imitation • Innovation • Independent application • Application across the curriculum © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  4. Talking for Learning and Life - developing Talk for Writing to fulfil potential across the curriculum The essence of non fiction... • ‘ We write best about what we know and what matters….’ • The best writing is written to engage the reader • Audience + Purpose = style + organisation. • Shifting register……. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  5. Just before we begin....... An introduction to key transferable non fiction techniques that will be referenced throughout the day. Generics of non fiction: • colour coding • topic sentences • structure - boxing up © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  6. Add burger / topic sentencs.. Make Playstations Available in School! Playstations should be available in all primary schools.There are a number of reasons why this should happen. The first reason for this is to help children enjoy their education more. Many school lessons are not very interesting and there are lots of children who find learning the school subjects dull. What about that terrible topic about traffic! However, most children enjoy computer games and if there were playstations in all schools then more children would look forward to coming to school because there would be at least one time in the day they would enjoy ! © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  7. Use colour coding to support under-standing of typical text features • Topic sentences – underlined • Structural features – e.g. headings – brown • Sentence signposts/ connectives – shocking pink • Generalisation – orange • Detail to illustrate points - green • Technical language - blue Handout 1 © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  8. Impact of colour-coded exemplar text • The effect of this was instantly amazing and therefore I used a similar method with my Y7 who were writing a report on the uses of ICT in society. • The results with all the classes astonished me. I had expected improvements, but not on the scale seen.

  9. Key features the 6 non-fiction text types have in common © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  10. Session One: Recount Warm-up activity Anecdotes - Memory boxes - unusual people, places or events. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  11. Little Red Riding Hood • Start with the story - retell in pairs or threes. • Brainstorm possibilities for non-fiction, e.g. ‘How to trap a wolf’. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  12. Tuning into the topic • Drama….role play, first lines, role on the wall, conscience alley, masks, etc…. • Environment… clues left in the room, woodland display, role play area, artwork.. • Read, read ,read…. how many versions do you know? • Multi media… Newsround website, First News, Teen Kids News, local radio station…..etc © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  13. Tuning into the topic…. • Work in pairs as woodcutter and local news hound. • As a class list possible questions - when, who, where, what, why + comments. • Teacher models interview with wolf (Julia + Pie). • Role play interview in pairs with woodcutter. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  14. Imitation • Learn orally the newspaper report, using a washing line. • Box the report into a grid and name the paragraph headings • Highlight any words or phrases that might be useful for writing an interview with grandma. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  15. Yesterday JS 32 palace medal © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  16. Local Wood Cutter Wins Medal Yesterday, local lumber-jack hero Jim Stevenson, 32 years old, was awarded a medal at a special ceremony in the palace for his bravery in rescuing Little Red Riding Hood from the jaws of a terrifying Wolf. In December last year, sharp-witted Jim put his lumber-jack skills to great use by tracking a vicious wolf he saw following a little girl in a red hood. He arrived at her grandmother’s cottage just in time to save the little girl and her granny. Jim heroically fought off the wolf with his axe. Jim told ‘The Informer’ that he was feeling very chipper about being awarded a medal. ‘I never expected that. I only did what any ordinary person would have done. It was the proudest moment of my life,’ he said. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  17. Innovation • Brainstorm good headline for granny article. • Interview Granny – battle axe or sweet old lady?! • Think through how you would write the opening paragraph – remember you need a hook and to include Who? What? Where? Why? When? (Invent relevant facts based on Little Red Riding Hood) Draw your paragraph to help. • Now, in turns, tell your opening paragraph to your partner and discuss how each version could be improved © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  18. Innovation • Add information to the grid - embellish if need be. • Shared writing of each paragraph followed by independent writing. • Delegates write own paragraphs and then work in pairs as response partners. Handout 2 © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  19. Innovation feedback Polishing and editing are key…. • Write own models for editing • Move from writing own texts for teaching editing on to using children’s writing - use of a visualizer • Teach editing as a class then in pairs. • Use marking to identify strengths and places where writing might be improved. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  20. Boxing up news articles © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  21. Independent application • Whole Class writing of another news article such as an interview with ‘Jack’ about the Beanstalk - or a character from a novel - or a real person in the school community about something of interest. • Children write own interviews up following the same process, focusing on a person/ event of their choosing. • The process - interview, map information onto grid, talk the article through before shared and independent writing. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  22. KS1 Recount : moving on from a recount of a trip/event…. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  23. Overall plan... Imitation: GINGERBREAD MAN DISAPPEARS! Oral version - little old man / lady interviewed. Children rewrote own reports of his tragic disappearance. Innovation: The next day’s news: Fox arrested! Following extensive enquiries, key suspect interviewed and arrested. Shared writing class and group versions. Independent application: Unusual find at Waterside Primary: BLUE BALLOON BRINGS TREASURE!! Independent writing Application across the curriculum:KING TUT FINALLY FOUND! EXCLUSIVE Interview with Howard Carter

  24. Current NS text type coverage © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  25. Application across the curriculum Identify where the language patterns of recount text can be embedded across the curriculum.. • Interview with ‘Magic Grandad’ as he goes back in time to Pudding Lane…. • Front page article on the day of Anne Boleyn’s execution - eyewitness accounts! Handout 5 © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  26. Use writing journals to remind children of connectives, generalisers, sentence patterns, etc. A few key reminders • Imitation : > tune into the topic and text type - have some fun! > read and talk the text type • Innovation: > box up > magpie and play with the language • Apply independently & across the curriculum • Shared/guided writing – driven by assessment is key. • Children write, edit & polish. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  27. Session 2:Persuasion

  28. Spirit of the age? Children are being recruited by marketing agencies to promote fizzy drinks and computer games to their friends. The “brand ambassadors”, some as young as seven, can earn up to £25 a week in vouchers for “chatting” about certain products – online or off – or hosting parties where the items are distributed. “Don’t start up a chat about the project,” advises marketing agency Dubit Insider. “It’s best to look for natural opportunities to drop it into the conversation.” The Week, February 2010 © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  29. Tuning into the text • Reading the text type • Talking the text type Through: warm up games, drama, booktalk, cloze procedure etc.

  30. Persuasion • Warm UP Games: • In pairs swap roles, taking one minute to persuade (monologue): • > a snowman to come into the • kitchen from outside; • > a dragon to stop eating maidens. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  31. Cloze Procedure For sale – a …….. opportunity to buy a ……, ………. school building, …… for conversion. This ….. of a building would make a ….. setting for 6 flats. …….. placed for the shopping centre and railway, the ……… grounds and …….. car parking is a ……. bonus. Complete with a ………… that money just cannot buy. The ……… school bell adds that …….. flavour. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  32. 4 progressive stages • Imitation - immerse in and learn simple leaflet. • Innovation - create leaflet for school. • Independent application - create leaflet to advertise local or invented attraction. • Application across the curriculum, e.g leaflets about conservation in science. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  33. Reading the text type Investigate leaflets for ‘hooks’ Join the race........ Find 5 different examples of persuasive techniques / common language patterns... eg. Question used to engage ...Are bored children driving you crazy? or Use of imperatives - those bossy sentences ... Don’t forget Lemurland! © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  34. Key language patterns • Questions – Are bored children driving you crazy? • Alliteration – Dino Dig & the Wacky Workshop • Rhyme – Dora the explorer • Repetition – Find us to find the fun • Imperatives (bossy sentences) – Don’t forget Lemurland! • Personal appeal – You can get close up and personal • Boastful language – The World’s oldest tourist attraction • Patterns of 3 – Visit. Shop it. Love it. • Short sentences – Discover Wildwood. • Language aimed at audience, e.g. Txt • Testimonials/quotes - “Join us for a great day out” © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  35. RURY x HRFP wwC W X There isOnly 5m CU! 55

  36. Imitation - Hawk’s Ridge Farm Park Are you ever bored at the weekend? Are thekids driving you crazy? Why not head straight to Hawk’s Ridge Farm Park and enter a world of wonder? See eagles fly. Wonder at the bats’ cave. Don’t miss Butterfly world. There is ample parking, a cool café and a great shop. Only 5 minutes from junction 25 of the motorway!See you there! © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  37. Innovation. All create school leaflet selling school as a local weekend attraction. • Box Up main categories. • Add possible details - ‘selling’ points/ amenities. • Orally rehearse, magpie language features from leaflets and oral model - draw own map using symbols to help support you. • Shared / independent writing. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  38. Independent Application: Create your own leaflet promoting your local area • Use words, phrases and selling ideas from your list and the leaflets. • List attractions in your area. • Create a leaflet, advertising your local area. • Be prepared to present orally. © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  39. Application across the curriculum • Create a leaflet to persuade other schools to visit their local museum after own class trip. History/ Science / Art etc • Leaflet to advertise the school summer fayre PHSE / Citizenship • Promote the term’s school production Music /Drama • Advertise a new product designed in DT How many more.........?? © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong 60 47

  40. More complex persuasionA persuasive argument at a higher level. • 3 stage process? • Appropriate level of model © Pie Corbett & Julia Strong

  41. Imitation • Communal version? • Tips for writing a model 59

  42. Paradise Island in Perilous Plight. It’s hard to imagine a world without the island of Odin. Sadly the island is under immediate threat and without your help, the consequences could be catastrophic! Will you do your duty and rise to the challenge? The famous Flower of Odin has been pushed to the brink of extinction by illegal harvesting.As a result,the Odinian people are losing their staple dietand worryingly a sacred part of their culture is at risk. In addition, the paradise island is under threat of pollution.Habitats are being trampled and rivers poisoned. No one but a fool would allow this situation to continue unchallenged. I would urge you to join our fight to save this unique island. Take immediate steps and call our campaign line or visit our website - see details below. Remember, you can make a difference!

  43. Innovation • Box up, shared writing • Tips for organisation ‘Clumping!’ 45

  44. Purpose: to persuade people to join a campaign. Audience: general public Many miners have been killed excavating Unobtanium Mining releases toxins from underground Miners returning from Pandora suffer long-term health issues including blood and bone cancers Unobtanium can be found below the Hallelujah Mountains. The Hallelujah Mountains (floating mountains) are sacred to the Na’vi. The Na’vi are exotic looking, 3 meters tall with smooth blue skin and sweeping tails. Na’vi tribes live in many different locations around Pandora and their homes are sacred to their heritage. Many animals on Pandora exist nowhere else, as they are adapted to the current planet conditions. The RDA mining operation causes pollution in many ways – damaging the purity of the water, scaring wildlife through loud noise The Dapophet (or ‘water plant’) is one of the key Na’vi nutrition sources, storing water in its tissues.

  45. ‘Clumping’ Step One: Which of the statements are least relevant to the aim? Discard for now Step Two: Clump the remaining pieces of information Step Three: Give each clump a heading.

  46. Aim : to persuade people to join the cause to protect Pandora Many miners have been killed excavating Unobtanium Mining releases toxins from underground Miners returning from Pandora suffer long-term health issues including blood and bone cancers Unobtanium can be found below the Hallelujah Mountains. The Hallelujah Mountains (floating mountains) are sacred to the Na’vi. The Na’vi are exotic looking, 3 meters tall with smooth blue skin and sweeping tails. Na’vi tribes live in many different locations around Pandora and their homes are sacred to their heritage. Many animals on Pandora exist nowhere else, as they are adapted to the current planet conditions. The RDA mining operation causes pollution in many ways – damaging the purity of the water, scaring wildlife through loud noise The Dapophet (or ‘water plant’) is one of the key Na’vi nutrition sources, storing water in its tissues.

  47. Step Four: Decide on the best order of your clumps Step Five: Turn each of your headings into a topic sentence. Step Six: Decide on the best order for the information within your clump.