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Art Smart

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Art Smart

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  1. Art Smart A conceptual captology design by Kara Blond and Josie Chou Design Challenge To design a mobile phone application that attempts to motivate or influence users. Time limit: 10 hours Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  2. Art Smart Persuasive Purpose • To increase self-efficacy by convincing hesitant museum visitors to see themselves as capable of understanding, creating and critiquing artwork • To persuade them to return to the Museum of Art Art Smart Monet’s Sunrise 1 What’s the Story? 2 Critic’s Corner 3 I’m an Artist! 4 Build My Gallery Industrial Design Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  3. User Description Local tourists who feel obligated to visit art museums but do not feel engaged or invested in the experience They are likely… • Ages 15-50 • Cell phone owners • Comfortable using technology Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  4. Ideation Bodystorming Mind Mapping Magazine Cutouts Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  5. Storyboard: BJ in New York For his upcoming trip to NY, BJ plans to visit all the Museum of Art. BJ’s friend in NY reminds him to take his cell phone with him, because a new technology called “Art Smart” enables mobile phone users to explore the art museum without renting an audio guide. While visiting the Museum of Art, BJ is excited to see a kiosk at the entrance teaching visitors how to use “Art Smart” on their cell phones. He dials “#64” to connect to the guiding center. The phone guide welcomes BJ and gives him options of exhibitions to view. Guided tours range from 45 to 90 minutes. BJ chooses the 60-minute tour. At each stop, BJ can choose whether to hear a story about the piece, critique it, recreate the artwork or add it to his customized gallery. BJ records his critique and sends it to the service center. He is excited to learn that his critique will be available for other visitors to hear. BJ also tries the morph function and downloads the “Woman with Yellow” artwork to his cell phone. He manipulates the artwork into “Woman with Red” and saves it to his personalized gallery website. When BJ returns to his hotel, his “artworks” are ready for viewing anywhere he has Internet access. He sends out emails to his friends to show his new adventure with “Art Smart” in NY. Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  6. Features/Functionality • Visitor comes to museum and uses his/her own cell phone (free minutes are co-sponsored by museum and phone company) •  Dial number to access museum system • “Phone guide” helps visitors through exhibit • Visitor makes choices about what to see • Visitors can hear narrative about artwork, critique artwork as memo, save activities to their gallery and access the gallery online • Online gallery is accessible two weeks Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  7. Prototype of Art Smart Kiosks near the museum entrance explain Art Smart. Each visitor’s experience will be accessible at their personal web gallery after the museum visit. Welcome to Art Smart Use your keypad toenter your name. ____________ Dial # when done. Visitors dial #64 as instructed, and then see the screen at right. Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  8. Phone guide welcomes the visitor; gives options for artwork to view • Artwork is presented within narrative structure • The guide then directs the visitor through the exhibit to the piece • Time-saving guided tours are also offered Art Smart Hi BJ! Welcome to the Museum of Art! Where to? 1 Banned in ’40s 2 Took 5 years 3 Sold for $20 mil Click for sound Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  9. At each stop, the visitor has four choices: • Hear the story of the piece. • Critique it and hear others’ critiques. • Morph the artwork. • Add to their customized gallery. Art Smart Monet’s Sunrise 1 What’s the Story? 2 Critic’s Corner 3 I’m an Artist! 4 Build My Gallery Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  10. 1. What’s the Story? The phone guide will tell a story about the piece, perhaps about its history, the artist, how it was made, etc. Art Smart What’s the Story 1 What’s the Story? 2 Critic’s Corner 3 I’m an Artist! 4 Build My Gallery Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  11. 2. Critic’s Corner Visitors may record critiques of the artwork by pressing the memo button on the phone and saving the recording. Visitors may upload the critique to their web gallery or share it with others. Visitors can also listen to others’ recent critiques. Art Smart Critic’s Corner 1 Submit Critique 2 Hear Critiques Save Rerecord Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  12. Art Smart I’m an Artist! Art Smart I’m an Artist! 3. I’m the Artist! Visitors can download the artwork to their screen and use the menus to morph the image, adding silly features, changing colors, etc. These can be saved to the visitor’s web gallery. Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  13. 4. Build My Gallery Here, the visitor will see a list of the activities they have completed. For each, they may choose to save it to their website, or delete it. Later, visitors can see their work by going to: Art Smart Build My Gallery 1 Original Sunrise 2 My Artwork 3 My Critique Save Delete www.mymuseum.org/name Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  14. For two weeks, visitors can access their personal web gallery, hear and view what they saved, and send out the URL to family & friends. www.mymuseum.org/bj My Museum Gallery I’m BJ and I visited the Museum of Art on April 22. Monet’s Sunrise Here’s what I saw… Dali’s Persistence of Memory Monet’s Sunrise Picasso’s Self-Portrait Van Gogh’s Starry Night The Story My Critique(15 visitors have listened to your critique) Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  15. Theoretical Justifications Persuasive Strategies • Personalization – with your personal web gallery & customized tour • Pregiving – of the free cell minutes; promise of the website • Self-feeling Positive – offers a chance to be creative, gives encouraging feedback • Improve self-efficacy by: • Social Proof (People listen to me! I’m part of an art community.) • Fun (This part is something I’m already comfortable with.) puts them in a receptive mood Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  16. Success!? What does success look like for visitors? • They go home and view/share their website • They want to come back • They tell others about the museum • They think of themselves as enthusiastic museum-goers capable of enjoying, critiquing and creating artwork Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  17. Results of User Testing • Avi, 27 • His phone has a small display – could be a problem • “I’d definitely be more likely to recommend it [the museum].” • “I’m not a big fan of museums, but I think I’d have fun with this.” • Worries that cell number would be given to telemarketers • Wouldn’t use art manipulation tool/better for kids • Ken, 32 • Would use the product • Technology is flexible and adaptive to his schedule • Persuades him to upgrade his cellular phone • Long using hours might run out of the battery power • Cellular reception quality might be a issue for indoor usage • Worries about cell phone radiation exposure Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  18. Shortcomings of Design • Not every visitor has a cell phone • Difficult to convince wireless service providers to join the sponsorship • During weekend, the signal traffic may be too busy for the network to run effectively • Limited accessible time for personal gallery • Reception may be fuzzy in museum • May be too complicated for average user Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  19. Expansion - What else is possible? • Museum visitors’ chat room • Use phone to vote for favorite artwork • Color star system for recognizing return visitors (shows up on website) • Allows return users to access old critiques/art • After two weeks, website displays a link to the museum calendar • Based on Art Smart choices, phone alerts you to museum events of particular interest to you Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  20. Next Steps in Design Process • Build rapid prototype of Art Smart • User test in a museum with our target audience (Is the phone is distracting? Other major concerns?) • Get programmers to consider feasibility of technology • Iterate • Focus groups with different target users • Build more technical prototype • Usability and learner studies Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  21. Evaluation of Captology Design Project How well does the design idea fit into the realm of captology? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How well does the design match the design brief? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How viable/convincing is the proposed solution? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  22. Evaluation continued… How clever is the proposed solution? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How effectively did the presentation communicate? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How well does the document communicate? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Bonus Points Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org

  23. Additional Comments: Overall remarks or additional comments here Stanford University, Spring 2002 Ed 225xs “Persuasive Technologies and Education” www.captology.org