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racket creek @ elk city lake near independence kansas project constructed december 7 9 2008 n.
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RACKET CREEK NEAR INDEPENDENCE, KANSAS PowerPoint Presentation
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RACKET CREEK NEAR INDEPENDENCE, KANSAS

RACKET CREEK NEAR INDEPENDENCE, KANSAS

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RACKET CREEK NEAR INDEPENDENCE, KANSAS

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  1. RACKET CREEK @ ELK CITY LAKE NEAR INDEPENDENCE, KANSASPROJECT CONSTRUCTED DECEMBER 7-9, 2008

  2. RACKET CREEK NEAR INDEPENDENCE, KANSAS • Bank erosion is actively eroding and threatening infrastructure within a U. S. Army Corps of Engineers public campground • Rural, sparsely populated • Bed material: silts, clay, aluvium, deeply incised • Pool-riffle-pool regime, slope less than 1% • Average width 30-40 ft • 32 ft tall eroding banks are a public safety issue • One gully had a series of headcuts up to 4 ft tall.

  3. PRE-PROJECT PHOTOSby Eugene Goff September 2008

  4. Looking US @ entrance conditions into project bend. PRE-PROJECT-RACKET CREEK PIX BY EUGENE GOFF SEPT 2008

  5. Looking US @ middle of project bend. PRE-PROJECT-RACKET CREEK PIX BY EUGENE GOFF SEPT 2008

  6. Looking DS @ middle of project bend. PRE-PROJECT-RACKET CREEK PIX BY EUGENE GOFF SEPT 2008

  7. Looking DS @ lower end of project bend. PRE-PROJECT-RACKET CREEK PIX BY EUGENE GOFF SEPT 2008

  8. Looking US @ entrance into straight section of the project. PRE-PROJECT-RACKET CREEK PIX BY EUGENE GOFF SEPT 2008

  9. Looking US at straight section of project. PRE-PROJECT-RACKET CREEK PIX BY EUGENE GOFF SEPT 2008

  10. STEP-BY-STEPS FOR RACKET CREEK All drawings by Dave Derrick

  11. Racket Creek, Independence, KS Top bank Eroding bank approximately 32 ft tall stream channel 1 of 9

  12. Racket Creek, Independence, KS Dig a notch (2 ft deep and 4 ft wide) to tuck LPSTP closer to bank toe 2 of 9

  13. Looking DS. Tracked back hoe has dug out a notch (2 ft deep & 4 ft wide) to tuck LPSTP closer to bank toe CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX BY DAVE DERRICK 12-8&9-2008

  14. Racket Creek, Independence, KS From top bank, dump stone down over hill 3 of 9

  15. Racket Creek, Independence, KS Tracked backhoe shapes stone into a Longitudinal Peaked Stone Toe Protection (LPSTP) with a crest height 4 ft above the base flow water surface elevation 4 of 9

  16. Racket Creek, Independence, KS Live Siltation Willow poles (termed Live Siltation) were then laid on the LPSTP at a rate of 3.5 poles per ft. Basal ends should be in vadose zone (capillary zone) 5 of 9

  17. Racket Creek, Independence, KS Soil dug from the opposite bank of the stream was used to “plant” the Live Siltation & also to provide a flatter slope for the eroded bank. 6 of 9

  18. Racket Creek, Independence, KS In some sections of the project the upper bank will be sloped to a stable angle of repose. 7 of 9

  19. Racket Creek, Independence, KS Rooted-stock plants will be added in spring 2009 to stabilize the bank, reduce high flow velocities, & provide a vegetated riparian corridor. 8 of 9

  20. Racket Creek, Independence, KS Seed & mulch all disturbed areas 9 of 9

  21. CONSTRUCTION PHOTOSby Dave Derrick, December 8-9, 2008

  22. Keys #1-3, LPSTP, Live Siltation, & soil placement at the upper end of the project bend.

  23. Looking DS @ hoe digging Key #1 CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX BY DAVE DERRICK 12-8&9-2008

  24. Looking US @ Key #1 with hoe digging Key #2. Key # 1 will be extended up the hill to top bank. The key will be vegetated with willow poles, filled with stone, backfilled with soil, with a berm at top bank to stop runoff flow down the key. CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX BY DAVE DERRICK 12-8&9-2008

  25. Looking US. Building Key #1. CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX BY DAVE DERRICK 12-8&9-2008

  26. It takes a BIG generator to brew coffee on a cold day in Kansas CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX BY DAVE DERRICK 12-8&9-2008

  27. Looking DS @ workers planting 2,000 willow poles CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX BY DAVE DERRICK 12-8&9-2008

  28. Looking US @ willows in key & on LPSTP. CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX BY DAVE DERRICK 12-8&9-2008

  29. Looking US @ hoe planting willows with soil from opposite bank CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX BY DAVE DERRICK 12-8&9-2008

  30. Looking US @ the upper section of the project bend with snow CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX BY DAVE DERRICK 12-8&9-2008

  31. Looking US @ first half of project bend with snow. CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX BY DAVE DERRICK 12-8&9-2008

  32. Looking DS @ hoe building Key #7 (last key in bend). Soil dug on inside of bend placed on outer bank. This soil would have been washed away since the stream was shifted over with Bendway Weirs CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX BY DAVE DERRICK 12-8&9-2008

  33. Traffic Control Stones delineate steep bank CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX BY DAVE DERRICK 12-8&9-2008

  34. Rooted-stock plants were installed March 18, 2009.

  35. Crew ready, RPM plants ready, let’s plant!! CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX SHOT 3-18-2009

  36. Root Production Method (RPM) • cRaZy gRoWtH WITHOUT CHANGING GENETICS (for oaks 0.8 inches @ DBH/year and 4 ft of growth per year are typical • A patented process • RPM Method developed by Wayne Lovelace in 1991 • Wayne Lovelace has 50 years experience in horticulture • RPM Method applied to over 250 different species-trees, shrubs, & grasses • Cost effective – 50 trees per acre vs 300-400 with seedlings • 60 acres of planted Mississippi River hardwood floodplain we observed (50 trees/acre, total 3,000 trees), only 7 trees dead

  37. Here is the teaser, an RPM Nuttal Oak, 7 years old, 7-inch dbh, & 35 ft tall. 92 degrees, we need shade PHOTO-DEB FREEMAN

  38. The RPM method is a 21 step patented process, with plants grown in bottomless trays. The tap root hits air and stops growing (air pruned). Plant is repotted twice, mychorrhiza inoculated twice, the rest is secret !!

  39. A stage 1 RPM seedling A bottomless tray in the greenhouse Photos by derrick

  40. Stage 2 Stage 1 Stage 3 Photos by derrick Meet Wayne Lovelace, the RPM inventor

  41. Acorns planted in Feb-March, these RPM trees are less than 6 months old Photo by derrick

  42. Three gallon container (removed), oak tree 6 months old, nothing but dense roots, allows for increased absorption of water, nutrients, and oxygen !!! Note mychorriza colonization (white area) Photo by derrick

  43. These RPM oaks were acorns in Feb, already 4-6 ft tall, several of these plants WERE PRODUCING ACORNS!!! Photo by derrick

  44. Acorns growing on a 6 month old Burr Oak. Typically these trees do not produce acorns during the first 30 years. Wayne says acorn production coincides with the wasting away of the tap root. Photo by derrick

  45. “Kimberley”, a natural cross between a Swamp White Oak & a Burr Oak discovered by Wayne’s wife. Over the last 20 years it has delivered 100 lbs of acorns per year (not diurnal). 50 Kimberlys per acre=5,000 lbs seed/food. Photo by derrick

  46. Planting the rooted-stock plants in the upstream half of the project bend. March 3, 2009.

  47. It’s a long way up! Topsoil added to slope eroded bank. CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX SHOT 3-18-2009

  48. Looking DS @ crew planting the upper section of the project bend. Note flows have reshaped the active stream channel. Fine material deposited between the short Bendway Weirs. CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX SHOT 3-18-2009

  49. Looking US @ the US section of the project bend. Channel within project is stable with sediment between Bendway Weirs. Bank has been graded & a few rooted-stock plants installed. CONSTRUCTION-RACKET CR. PIX SHOT 3-18-2009