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MenTORSHIP 101: PowerPoint Presentation
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MenTORSHIP 101:

MenTORSHIP 101:

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MenTORSHIP 101:

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  1. MenTORSHIP 101: WHY YOU NEED ONE/HOW TO FIND One/ WHAT YOU NEED TO HAVE A GREAT ONE Presented by: Genevieve Richards, JD Program Coordinator South Central Scholars Kyra Young Program Coordinator/Regional Adviser SCS Alum- UCLA

  2. How to participate on a webinar • 1) Chat & Questions. If you do NOT have access to a mic and do not call in with a phone, you can use the Questions feature to type a question that you want to ask to the presenters. At the end of the presentation, the facilitator will read out loud any questions that come through this feature. • 2) Raise Hand. For most of the webinar, all participants will be in listen-only mode, meaning that they will be muted. When the presenter opens the floor for questions, people will not be unmuted unless they use the Raise Hand function. • 3) Surveys.After the webinar ends, a link will be emailed to you to participate in a survey. We encourage ALL participants to participate.

  3. MENTORSHIP 101 This evening we’ll discuss… • Why you need a mentor • How to find a mentor • How to have a great mentorship

  4. TYPES OF MENTORSHIPS Type 1: relationship is formally established for an introductory or short period, often to meet specific objectives. The mentee’s need is high and the mentor’s resources, time etc are low. Type 3: relationship is formally established for an extended period in order to meet specific objectives. The mentee’s need is high and the mentor’s resources are abundant. The potential exists for an intense and productive relationship Very Formal Formality of Relationship Type 2: ranges from spontaneous help to a one off meeting or as needed catch ups. The mentor’s resources and mentee’s needs are low, spontaneous or occasional. Very short check-ins may be adequate and satisfying to both parties. Type 4: consists of being available as needed to discuss problems, to listen or to share special knowledge. The mentor’s resources are substantial, but the mentee’s needs are low. Occasional help may be all that is needed, and the mentor may have time and talents available for helping others. Informal Length of Relationship Short Term/One-Time Long-Term

  5. TYPES OF MENTORSHIPS : PART 2 Mentor Types -Career -Academic -Personal -Perspective -Transitional Mentor Uses -Advising -Informational -Strategizing -Networking -Resources -Opportunities -Support

  6. Advantages Why You need a Mentor Step 1: Figure the areas of your life where you would benefit from having additional support from an outside source -Career: Job path, opportunities, training, alternative practices in the field -Academic: academic assistance, research, projects, introduction to other profs/school resources -Personal: emotional support, guidance, friendship -Next steps: decision-making, planning

  7. Advantages Why You need a Mentor Figure the areas of your life where you would benefit from having additional support from an outside source -Career: Job path, opportunities, training, alternative practices in the field, references -Academic: academic assistance, research, projects, introduction to other profs/school resources -Personal: emotional support, guidance, friendship -Next steps: decision-making, planning Remember: Figure out what you need first before seeking out a mentor

  8. Advantages Why You need a Mentor • Receive one to one attention/interaction from someone who is interested in your well-being • Mentors are meant to cater directly to your individual in an situation that appropriately falls under the umbrella of your mentorship • Mentors have likely already faced the same or similar challenges/issues/decisions as the ones you might be facing for the first time • Mentors provide you with important perspective/information about critical issues related to the nature of your mentorship • Mentors help support the achievement of positive outcomes in your life.

  9. How To Get a mentor • Step 1: Self-assess your mentee potential • Ask yourself – What are my goals? How can a mentor assist me in meeting these goals? What are my strengths and weaknesses? • How will I take initiative in a mentorship: . Introduce yourself by phone, brief letter or email? • How comfortable will I be in inviting a mentor to meet or suggesting potential topics for discussion? • What skills sets of mine require additional mentoring: What skills • do I need to learn or improve? What do I want to change about my • work style? What professional networks are important?

  10. How To Get a mentor • Step 2: Identify potential mentors • Consider people from the following categories as prospective mentor OR sources for connections to prospective mentors • -On campus: professors, school personnel, clubs/ club advisors • On-campus organizations, volunteer experiences • -off-campus: jobs (bosses, supervisors, senior colleagues) , extracurricular activities, clubs, organizations,

  11. Step 3: Reach out How To Get a mentor Depending on the situation, you may not be comfortable simply calling somebody and asking, "Will you be my mentor?" A better way to feel out the situation is to ask the person for advice -- on formatting your resume for example. By asking a few questions, you can determine if you find her helpful and want her assistance to be an ongoing relationship. Also consider writing an email, letting the person know what you appreciate about the work he or she has done and how that has influenced you. Ask if they might be available to sit down with you for coffee/tea and have a quick chat. Sometimes, no actual request needs to made, the mentorship just falls into place The most important aspect of finding a mentor is making sure the person has time for you. If he or she is simply too busy, it won't be a beneficial relationship for you or the mentor.

  12. Make the Most of your mentorship Lay a Good Foundation for the Mentorship • Develop a clear understanding of realistic expectations as you build a mentoring relationship. • Figure out what you want from a mentor and what you want to learn. Work on a schedule that will meet your needs and that is convenient for your mentor. • Initiate and maintain regular contact with your mentor – determine ahead of time what “regular” means to both of you. • First, get to know each other. Share information about yourself. Let them know your interests, skills, values, personality traits and what you have accomplished.

  13. Make the Most of your mentorship Tips to Keep in Mind • Be considerate of the time and energy your mentor is making with you. Reciprocate. Thank them for their time. • Promptly return calls and messages from your mentor. • Prepare for meetings by generating a list of appropriate questions or relevant topics for discussion. • Be courteous and professional; dress appropriately. • Ask your mentor for career tips and advice – be prepared to ask for the types of guidance you need.

  14. Try the things your mentor suggests that you might have thought were beyond your abilities. Don’t worry if the mentor is in an occupation other than the one in which you are interested. Have multiple mentors. Talk to him or her about the courses you are taking or have taken and request help with goal setting. Make the Most of your mentorship Tips to Keep in Mind • -Ask your mentor to review your resume and ask if anything could be stated more strongly and memorably. • Ask him/her for practice answering difficult interview questions if you have one coming up. • “Shadow” your mentor at his or her workplace; listen and learn from the advice of someone who’s been there. • Obtain feedback on your interpersonal skills. • Request to be linked to other professionals to create a resource network.

  15. Tips to Keep in Mind Make the Most of your mentorship • Enjoy this opportunity to grow both personally and professionally. • Think about three things you could do for your mentor. In what ways will you give back to him/her? • Try the things your mentor suggests that you might have thought were beyond your abilities. • Don’t worry if the mentor is in an occupation other than the one in which you are interested. • Have multiple mentors. • Talk to him or her about the courses you are taking or have taken and request help with goal setting

  16. A Great Mentee… BEING A GREAT MENTEE • Displays confidence and competence. • Demonstrates his/her potential to achieve. • Establishes a solid reputation for dependability and capacity to learn. • Demonstrates his/her commitment to the mentoring relationship. • Takes advantage of informal meetings and key interfaces. • Makes a positive impression at any opportunity. • Takes initiative and acts the part of an upwardly mobile individual. • Shows enthusiasm to absorb knowledge. • Makes themselves accessible.

  17. Q & A

  18. Thank you! For information about scheduled events and webinars, go to: http://www.southcentralscholars.org/calendar_of_events NOTE: If you’d like to request a mentor from the SCS network : 1. Go to the South Central Scholar’s website 2. Click the Scholar Center Tab 3. Complete the Mentor Request Form