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Chapter 5 Local Area Networks

Chapter 5 Local Area Networks

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Chapter 5 Local Area Networks

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  1. Chapter 5Local Area Networks

  2. Chapter Contents • Section A: Network Building Blocks • Section B: Wired and Wireless Technologies • Section C: Network Setup • Section D: Sharing Files • Section E: Wireless Security Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  3. FastPoll True/False QuestionsAnswer A for True and B for False • 050100 The networks typically installed by individuals in homes are classified as LANs. • 050200 High bandwidth networks, such as cable TV and DSL are referred to as broadband. • 050300 When you send an e-mail message over a network, it is chopped up into packets. • 050400 The IP address assigned to your computer on the Internet is derived from your computer’s MAC address. • 050500 Wired network connections can offer higher speeds than wireless connections. Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  4. FastPoll True/False QuestionsAnswer A for True and B for False • 050600 The most popular type of wired connection is Ethernet. • 050700 Network speeds are measured in megabytes and gigabytes. • 050800 Many wireless connections use radio waves to transmit data. • 050900 Bluetooth is a wireless technology used for WANs. Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  5. FastPoll True/False QuestionsAnswer A for True and B for False • 051000 A wireless infrastructure networkuses a centralized broadcasting device, such as a wireless access point or router. • 051100 Wireless connections are less secure than wired networks. • 051200 A hub can be used to extend a network by adding additional wired devices. • 051300 To configure a router, you usually have to start a browser and enter the router’s IP address. Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  6. FastPoll True/False QuestionsAnswer A for True and B for False • 051400 A homegroup is a temporary network of handheld computers. • 051500Public key encryption uses a public key to encrypt messages, but a private key is required to decrypt messages. Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  7. Section A: Network Building Blocks • Network Classifications • LAN Advantages and Disadvantages • Network Devices • Network Links • Communications Protocols Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  8. Question • 052100 Networks come in many sizes and use many different technologies, yet they all need to communicate with each other. What is the key to network intercommunication? • A. Circuit switching • B. Network protocols • C. Network topology • D. Peer-to-peer technology Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  9. Network Classifications • Personal Area Network (PAN) – interconnection of personal digital devices or consumer electronics • Local Area Network (LAN) – connects computers in a limited geographical area • Metropolitan Area Network (MAN) – public high-speed network with range of about 50 miles • Wide Area Network (WAN) – covers a large geographical area and typically consists of several smaller networks Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  10. LAN Advantages and Disadvantages • LANs enable people to work together • Sharing networked software can reduce costs • Sharing data on a LAN can increase productivity • Sharing networked hardware can reduce costs • Sharing an Internet connection can be cost-effective and convenient • Sharing networked hardware can provide access to a wide range of services and specialized peripheral devices Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  11. LAN Advantages and Disadvantages • One disadvantage of LANs is that when a network malfunctions, all the resources you’re accustomed to accessing are unavailable until the network is repaired • LANs are vulnerable to unauthorized access • LANs are vulnerable to malicious code Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  12. Network Devices • Each connection point on a network is a node • To connect to a LAN, a computer requires network circuitry, sometimes referred to as a network interface card (NIC) • A networked peripheral, or network-enabled peripheral, is any device that contains network circuitry to directly connect to a network • A storage device that directly connects to a network is called network attached storage (NAS) • A network device, or network appliance, is any electronic device that broadcasts network data, boosts signals, or routes data to its destination Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  13. Network Devices Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  14. Network Links • A communications channel, or link, is a physical path or frequency for signal transmissions • Bandwidth is the transmission capacity of a communications channel • Broadband • Narrowband Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  15. Communications Protocols • Rules for efficiently transmitting data from one network node to another: • Divide messages into packets • Affix addresses to packets • Initiate transmission • Regulate flow of data • Check for transmission errors • Acknowledge receipt of transmitted data Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  16. Communications Protocols • A packet is a “parcel” of data that is sent across a computer network • Circuit-switching technology vs. packet switching technology Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  17. Communications Protocols • Every packet that travels over a network includes the address of its destination device • A MAC address is a unique number assigned to a network interface card when it is manufactured • An IP address is a series of numbers used to identify a network device • IP addresses can be obtained through DHCP Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  18. Section B: Wired and Wireless Technologies • Wired Basics • Ethernet • Wireless Basics • Bluetooth • Wi-Fi Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  19. Question • 052200 Suppose your friend has a home office and usually does most work on a desktop computer. Your friend also has a smartphone and tablet computer that could benefit from Internet access. What kind of network would you recommend? • A. A network that has a wireless router that provides wireless and wired connections as well as Internet access • B. A cloud network that can be accessed from a bridge device • C. A file server • D. A 100 gigabit Ethernet network Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  20. Wired Basics • A wired network uses cables to connect network devices • Wired networks are fast, secure, and simple to configure • Wired connections are more secure than their wireless counterparts • Devices tethered to cables have limited mobility Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  21. Ethernet • Ethernet is a wired network technology that is defined by IEEE 802.3 standards • Simultaneously broadcasts data packets to all network devices • Vary in speed from 10Mbps to 100Gbps Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  22. Ethernet Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  23. Wireless Basics • Wireless network technology transports data from one device to another without cables or wires • RF signals • Transceiver • Microwaves • Infrared light • Slower than wired networks • Security concerns Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  24. Bluetooth • Bluetooth is a short-range, wireless network technology designed to make its own connections between two devices Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  25. Wi-Fi • Wi-Fi refers to a set of wireless networking technologies defined by IEEE 802.11 standards • Wireless ad-hoc protocol • Wireless infrastructure protocol Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  26. Wi-Fi Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  27. Section C: Network Setup • Setup Overview • Router Installation • Router Configuration • Internet Connection • Device Connection Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  28. Question • 052300 When you’re setting up a wireless network, you see an option asking if you want to broadcast the network SSID. You should: • A. Change the default SSID and broadcast it. • B. Turn SSID broadcasting off so that hackers don’t know the network’s encryption key. • C. Make sure SSID is broadcasting so that your network is protected by strong encryption. • D. Activate SSID broadcasting or else the network devices won’t be able to send data to the router. Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  29. Setup Overview • Plug in the router • Connect the router to a computer • Configure the router • Access the router setup utility • Create a new router password Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  30. Setup Overview • Enter an SSID for the network • Activate WEP, WPA, or PSK and create an encryption key • Connect an Internet access device • Set up the wireless workstations Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  31. Router Installation • Look for a Wireless-N router that includes a Gigabit Ethernet switch • Wired and wireless connections • Make sure the number of Ethernet ports is sufficient for the number of wired devices that you intend to connect Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  32. Router Installation Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  33. Router Configuration • Before using your network, you should adjust the router’s configuration settings to make sure your network is secure • Stored in router’s EEPROM • You must connect a computer to the router • You can use your computer’s browser to access the router configuration utility Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  34. Router Configuration Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  35. Router Configuration • An SSID (service set identifier) is the name of a wireless network • Use the router configuration software to change the default SSID Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  36. Router Configuration • Each workstation requires a unique address for sending and receiving data Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  37. Router Configuration • Wireless encryption scrambles the data transmitted between wireless devices and then unscrambles the data only on devices that have a valid encryption key • WEP • WPA • PSK Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  38. Internet Connection • Your Internet service provider supplies a device called a modem that is designed to carry data to and from the Internet • This device typically has a standard Ethernet port that can be connected to a router • Most routers supply a WAN port designed for an Internet connection • Plug a standard network cable into the router’s WAN port and connect the other end of the cable into the Internet modem Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  39. Internet Connection Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  40. Device Connection • Simply turn on any Windows computer with wireless capability and make sure that it is in range of your router Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  41. Device Connection • Macs automatically sense available networks and give you the option of connecting to them Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  42. Device Connection • Any device that has Wi-Fi capability should be able to connect to your network Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  43. Device Connection Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  44. Section D: Sharing Files • File Sharing Basics • Accessing Shared Files • Sharing Your Files • File Servers • Network Troubleshooting Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  45. Question • 052400 There are many ways to share files among the computers on a network. Which one of the following is the LEAST secure way to share files? • A. Use a file server. • B. Activate file sharing for the root directory of all the computers in the network. • C. Designate specific folders on your computer as shared. • D. Put files you want to share in the Public folder. Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  46. File Sharing Basics • File sharing allows files containing documents, photos, music, and other data to be accessed from computers other than the one on which they are stored • Once your network gives you access to other computers on the network, you can view a list of files stored there Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  47. Accessing Shared Files • To see a list of devices on your network, you can use your operating system’s file management utility • Network discovery is a setting that affects whether your computer can see other computers on a network, and whether your computer can be seen by others Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  48. Accessing Shared Files Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  49. Sharing Your Files Chapter 5: Local Area Networks

  50. Sharing Your Files • When you activate file sharing, files in Public folders can be accessed by other network users • You also can make specific files shareable • If you want the convenience of sharing files, limit what you share and who you share it with: • Assign permissions to files • Limit sharing to specific people • Remove sharing from files you no longer want to share • Use a homegroup if your network is composed of Windows computers • A homegroup is a collection of trusted Windows computers that automatically share files and folders Chapter 5: Local Area Networks