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Hate Crime: The Victims’ Perspective

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  1. Hate Crime: The Victims’ Perspective Rachel Griffin, Strategic Development Manager Rachel.griffin@victimsupport.org.uk

  2. Hate Crime: The Victims’ Perspective 2006: Crime and Prejudice – The support needs of victims of hate crime: a research report 2008: Victim Support becomes one charity

  3. Hate Crime: The Victims’ Perspective • What have our clients told us about what it is like to be a victim? • What do victims need, from Victim Support, from our partners in the community, and from the criminal justice system? • And how can we work together to help to deliver that support?

  4. Hate Crime: The Victims’ Perspective “Hate crime and its victims are not all stamped out of the same mould, so supporting them requires dedication, imagination and flexibility”. (Respondent to Victim Support’s research project, Crime and Prejudice, June 2006)

  5. What it is like to be a victim? • Fear, particularly of repeat attacks • Anger • Illness including depression and physical ailments • Trauma of victims’ children • Restrictions in lifestyle • Considerable financial loss

  6. What it is like to be a victim? “It made me scared to be alone in the house. I felt unsafe.” “I get angry and keep it inside until I get home. Then I bang doors and windows and let it all out, because I don’t want them to see how it affects me.”

  7. “My blood pressure rose up to 225. Basically I went into shock.” “We have developed a terrible sense of insecurity, but the worst of all is my little one. Since this last attack he wakes up almost every night with nightmares, crying, and any small noise distracts his attention.” What it is like to be a victim?

  8. “Damage to windows due to firework being thrown. Balls were also kicked against the windows. Lights were damaged outside the house, which were hired for a family wedding, costing £3500 to replace.” “I thought if I was going to get harassed when I go out, then I’d rather stay inside. It got to the point where I stopped working and I started claiming benefits.” What it is like to be a victim?

  9. “The Kurdish Community Association [was the most helpful] because if they were not there I wouldn’t understand anything. They contacted Victim Support and provided an interpreter at the police station.” “It was the two police officers that visited us [that were the most helpful]. They were very understanding and they tried to make us feel better.” What do victims need from all of us?

  10. Improve access to Victim Support Get over the language barrier Tackle the root cause of hate crime Create easier reporting mechanisms Victims’ recommendations for improving services:

  11. Race for Justice Work with the Criminal Justice System Keep on talking How can we work together?

  12. Hate Crime: The Victims’ Perspective Rachel Griffin, Strategic Development Manager Rachel.griffin@victimsupport.org.uk