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Performance and Outcome Measures

Performance and Outcome Measures

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Performance and Outcome Measures

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  1. Performance and Outcome Measures David Wright, Ph.D. and Nancy Warren Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services September 27-28, 2012 Oklahoma Drug Court Conference

  2. Why is Drug Court Data Important to Me? • Courts that were evaluated and used the results to make changes to their court had 85% greater reductions in recidivism. • These same courts had 100% higher cost savings than courts who did NOT use evaluations to modify their programs. Source: NPC Research – Top 10 Drug Court Best Practices and More! What Works? New Findings from the Latest Research http://www.npcresearch.com/Files/Conference%20presentations/2012_Best_Practices_Top_10.pdf

  3. Performance Measurement Quotes “Performance is your reality. Forget everything else.” - Harold S. Geneen “It doesn't matter how valid your excuses, they will never change your performance.” - Unknown

  4. Performance Measurement Quotes “Where performance is measured, performance improves. Where performance is measured and reported, the rate of improvement accelerates.” - Thomas S. Monson

  5. Trends in Performance &OutcomeMeasures

  6. Target Population • Ensure the court is targeting prison-bound offenders (legislative intent) • Drug courts show the greatest benefits for high risk offenders - those with more prior felony convictions, with relatively more severe antisocial backgrounds or treatment-resistant histories.* • These high-risk offenders are the most in need of the intensive supervision services as embodied in the 10 Key Components of drug courts.* * Targeting the Right Participants for Adult Drug Courts: Part One of a Two-Part Series – Douglas B. Marlowe, JD, PhD

  7. Percent of Drug Court Admissions with NO Prior Felony Convictions

  8. Average Number of Days Between Drug Court Application and Admission

  9. Completion Rate Among Drug Court Participants

  10. Percent Decrease in Unemployment Among Drug Court Graduates

  11. Percent Decrease Among Drug Court Graduates without a High School Diploma/GED

  12. Percent Increase in Children Living with Drug Court Participant at Graduation

  13. Percent Increase in Income Among Drug Court Graduates

  14. Incentives to Sanctions Ratio Among Drug Court Participants

  15. Average Length of Time from Violation to Sanction (in days)

  16. Percent of Drug Court Participants Testing Positive in Final Phase

  17. CurrentPerformance &OutcomeMeasures

  18. Unemployment at Entry and Graduation

  19. Monthly Income at Entry and Graduation

  20. Participants Lacking a High School Diploma/GED at Entry and Graduation

  21. Participants with Children Living with Them at Entry and Graduation

  22. Percent of Admissions by Drug of Choice and Fiscal Year

  23. METH Busters Meth abusers will not do well in Drug Court. Myth:

  24. Drug Court Completion Rates by Drug of Choice

  25. Unemployment at Entry and Graduation

  26. Participants Lacking a High School Diploma/GED at Entry and Graduation

  27. Participants with Children Living with Them at Entry and Graduation

  28. Selected Outcomes Among Drug Court Graduates by Drug of Choice (Percent Change Between Entry and Graduation)

  29. Meth abusers will not do well in Drug Court. Myth:

  30. Performance & Outcome MeasuresThroughAdministrativeData Matching

  31. Advantages of Using Administrative Data • Sustainable and Ongoing • Provides Long-Term Outcome Measures • Empirically-Based & Objective • Less Resource Intensive • No Sampling or Response Rate Issues • Incremental for Populations & Time Frames • Unobtrusive • Allows Examination of Overlap Between Agency Populations

  32. Data Extraction Data Matching Data Analysis Data Matching Data Distribution Data Cleaning External agency data are matched to ODMHSAS data based on Name, DOB, Sex, SSN ODMHSAS staff clean database to remove suffixes from names, bad characters Analysis assists in identification of overlap, differences between groups, and possible outcome measures Results are provided to appropriate stakeholder groups External agency records are matched to themselves to identify duplicates External agency staff extract appropriate data from databases Matching Process Data transferred to ODMHSAS staff Manual review of names and other fields ODMHSAS staff reviews results, information provided to external agency staff for review Manual analysis to verify accuracy of matching process

  33. Administrative Data Matching • ODMHSAS – State & Medicaid funded Substance Abuse and Mental Health Treatment Services • OSBI – Arrests • DOC – Incarcerations, Probation & Parole • OESC – Wage & Unemployment Benefits • OSDH – Mortality Data • DHS – TANF, Food Stamps, Child Welfare • County Jails – Arrest and Booking Information

  34. Re-Arrest Rate by Release Type

  35. Reception to DOC After Graduation from Drug Court Three Year Recidivism Rate by Year The rate for all 2,094 graduates represented in this chart is 7.1%. N = 880 N = 437 N = 484 N = 293

  36. Reception to DOC After Three Years by Release Type

  37. Matching Drug Court Participant Data with Oklahoma Employment Security Commission • Purpose • Research/Cost-Benefit Analysis • Validation/Verification of Drug Court Coordinator Data in DC WEBS • Research Questions • What percentage of participants are employed before, during and after drug court? • What is the income of participants before, during and after drug court? • How much income is earned through wages from drug court graduates? • How much tax revenue is generated from drug court graduates?

  38. Percent of Drug Court Graduates Employed

  39. Percent of Drug Court Graduates Employed As Reported by Drug Court Coordinator and Through OESC

  40. Average Annual Income of Drug Court Graduates

  41. Average Annual Income of Drug Court Graduates As Reported by Drug Court Coordinator and Through OESC

  42. Annual Wages Earned by Drug Court Graduates

  43. Annual Taxes Expected to be Paid by Drug Court Graduates $1.4 million in total tax revenue was expected to be generated over a three year period after admission to drug court.

  44. Three Year Cost, Wage, and Tax Comparison: DOC Inmates vs. Drug Court Participants

  45. Data Provides Performance Measures Good Performance Measures = $$$ $$$ = Sustainability

  46. Drug Court Data Collection