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Lecture 24 Design for Testability (DFT): Partial-Scan & Scan Variations PowerPoint Presentation
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Lecture 24 Design for Testability (DFT): Partial-Scan & Scan Variations

Lecture 24 Design for Testability (DFT): Partial-Scan & Scan Variations

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Lecture 24 Design for Testability (DFT): Partial-Scan & Scan Variations

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  1. Lecture 24Design for Testability (DFT): Partial-Scan & Scan Variations • Definition • Partial-scan architecture • Historical background • Cyclic and acyclic structures • Partial-scan by cycle-breaking • S-graph and MFVS problem • Test generation and test statistics • Partial vs. full scan • Partial-scan flip-flop • Random-access scan (RAS) • Scan-hold flip-flop (SHFF) • Summary VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  2. Partial-Scan Definition • A subset of flip-flops is scanned. • Objectives: • Minimize area overhead and scan sequence length, yet achieve required fault coverage • Exclude selected flip-flops from scan: • Improve performance • Allow limited scan design rule violations • Allow automation: • In scan flip-flop selection • In test generation • Shorter scan sequences VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  3. Partial-Scan Architecture PI PO Combinational circuit CK1 FF FF CK2 SCANOUT SFF TC SFF SCANIN VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  4. History of Partial-Scan • Scan flip-flop selection from testability measures, Trischler et al., ITC-80; not too successful. • Use of combinational ATPG: • Agrawal et al., D&T, Apr. 88 • Functional vectors for initial fault coverage • Scan flip-flops selected by ATPG • Gupta et al., IEEETC, Apr. 90 • Balanced structure • Sometimes requires high scan percentage • Use of sequential ATPG: • Cheng and Agrawal, IEEETC, Apr. 90; Kunzmann and Wunderlich, JETTA, May 90 • Create cycle-free structure for efficient ATPG VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  5. Difficulties in Seq. ATPG • Poor initializability. • Poor controllability/observability of state variables. • Gate count, number of flip-flops, and sequential depth do not explain the problem. • Cycles are mainly responsible for complexity. • An ATPG experiment: Circuit Number of Number of Sequential ATPG Fault gates flip-flops depth CPU s coverage TLC 355 21 14* 1,247 89.01% Chip A 1,112 39 14 269 98.80% * Maximum number of flip-flops on a PI to PO path VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  6. Benchmark Circuits Circuit PI PO FF Gates Structure Sequential depth Total faults Detected faults Potentially detected faults Untestable faults Abandoned faults Fault coverage (%) Fault efficiency (%) Max. sequence length Total test vectors Gentest CPU s (Sparc 2) s1494 8 19 6 647 Cyclic -- 1506 1379 2 30 97 91.6 93.4 28 559 19183 s1238 14 14 18 508 Cycle-free 4 1355 1283 0 72 0 94.7 100.0 3 308 15 s1196 14 14 18 529 Cycle-free 4 1242 1239 0 3 0 99.8 100.0 3 313 10 s1488 8 19 6 653 Cyclic -- 1486 1384 2 26 76 93.1 94.8 24 525 19941 VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  7. F2 2 F3 F1 3 Level = 1 Cycle-Free Example Circuit F2 2 F3 F1 3 Level = 1 s - graph dseq = 3 All faults are testable. See Example 8.6. VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  8. Relevant Results • Theorem 8.1: A cycle-free circuit is always initializable. It is also initializable in the presence of any non-flip-flop fault. • Theorem 8.2: Any non-flip-flop fault in a cycle-free circuit can be detected by at most dseq + 1 vectors. • ATPG complexity: To determine that a fault is untestable in a cyclic circuit, an ATPG program using nine-valued logic may have to analyze 9Nff time-frames, where Nff is the number of flip-flops in the circuit. VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  9. A Partial-Scan Method • Select a minimal set of flip-flops for scan to eliminate all cycles. • Alternatively, to keep the overhead low only long cycles may be eliminated. • In some circuits with a large number of self-loops, all cycles other than self-loops may be eliminated. VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  10. The MFVS Problem • For a directed graph find a set of vertices with smallest cardinality such that the deletion of this vertex-set makes the graph acyclic. • The minimum feedback vertex set (MFVS) problem is NP-complete; practical solutions use heuristics. • A secondary objective of minimizing the depth of acyclic graph is useful. 3 3 L=3 1 2 4 5 6 2 4 5 1 6 L=2 L=1 s-graph A 6-flip-flop circuit VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  11. Test Generation • Scan and non-scan flip-flops are controlled from separate clock PIs: • Normal mode – Both clocks active • Scan mode – Only scan clock active • Seq. ATPG model: • Scan flip-flops replaced by PI and PO • Seq. ATPG program used for test generation • Scan register test sequence, 001100…, of length nsff + 4 applied in the scan mode • Each ATPG vector is preceded by a scan-in sequence to set scan flip-flop states • A scan-out sequence is added at the end of each vector sequence • Test length = (nATPG + 2) nsff + nATPG + 4 clocks VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  12. Partial Scan Example • Circuit: TLC • 355 gates • 21 flip-flops Scan Max. cycle Depth* ATPG Fault sim. Fault ATPG Test seq. flip-flops length CPU s CPU s cov. vectors length 0 4 14 1,247 61 89.01% 805 805 4 2 10 157 11 95.90% 247 1,249 9 1 5 32 4 99.20% 136 1,382 10 1 3 13 4 100.00% 112 1,256 21 0 0 2 2 100.00% 52 1,190 * Cyclic paths ignored VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  13. Test Length Statistics • Circuit: TLC 200 100 0 Number of faults Without scan Test length 0 50 100 150 200 250 200 100 0 Number of faults 9 scan flip-flops Test length 0 5 10 15 20 25 200 100 0 Number of faults 10 scan flip-flops Test length 0 5 10 15 20 25 VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  14. Partial vs. Full Scan: S5378 Original 2,781 179 0 0.0% 4,603 35/49 70.0% 70.9% 5,533 s 414 414 Full-scan 2,781 0 179 15.66% 4,603 214/228 99.1% 100.0% 5 s 585 105,662 Partial-scan 2,781 149 30 2.63% 4,603 65/79 93.7% 99.5% 727 s 1,117 34,691 Number of combinational gates Number of non-scan flip-flops (10 gates each) Number of scan flip-flops (14 gates each) Gate overhead Number of faults PI/PO for ATPG Fault coverage Fault efficiency CPU time on SUN Ultra II 200MHz processor Number of ATPG vectors Scan sequence length VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  15. Flip-flop for Partial Scan • Normal scan flip-flop (SFF) with multiplexer of the LSSD flip-flop is used. • Scan flip-flops require a separate clock control: • Either use a separate clock pin • Or use an alternative design for a single clock pin D Master latch Slave latch MUX Q SD TC SFF (Scan flip-flop) CK TC CK Normal mode Scan mode VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  16. Random-Access Scan (RAS) PI PO Combinational logic RAM nff bits CK TC SCANOUT SCANIN SEL Address decoder Address scan register log2 nff bits ADDRESS ACK VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  17. RAS Flip-Flop (RAM Cell) D Q To comb. logic From comb. logic SD Scan flip-flop (SFF) SCANIN CK TC SCANOUT SEL VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  18. RAS Applications • Logic test: reduced test length. • Delay test: Easy to generate single-input-change (SIC) delay tests. • Advantage: RAS may be suitable for certain architecture, e.g., where memory is implemented as a RAM block. • Disadvantages: • Not suitable for random logic architecture • High overhead – gates added to SFF, address decoder, address register, extra pins and routing VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  19. Scan-Hold Flip-Flop (SHFF) To SD of next SHFF D • The control input HOLD keeps the output steady at previous state of flip-flop. • Applications: • Reduce power dissipation during scan • Isolate asynchronous parts during scan test • Delay testing Q SD SFF TC Q CK HOLD VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24

  20. Summary • Partial-scan is a generalized scan method; scan can vary from 0 to 100%. • Elimination of long cycles can improve testability via sequential ATPG. • Elimination of all cycles and self-loops allows combinational ATPG. • Partial-scan has lower overheads (area and delay) and reduced test length. • Partial-scan allows limited violations of scan design rules, e.g., a flip-flop on a critical path may not be scanned. VLSI Test: Bushnell-Agrawal/Lecture 24