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RESPONSE TO INSTRUCTION AND INTERVENTION – RTI 2 TIER ONE

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  1. RESPONSE TO INSTRUCTION AND INTERVENTION – RTI2TIER ONE Shasta County Office of Education Sept. 22, 2010

  2. Agenda • Overview and Refresher from August Conference • Understanding Universal Screening and Initial Identification • Delivering Quality Teaching of Core Programs with Differentiated Instruction & In-Class Monitoring • Using Standards, Benchmark Assessments, and Data for Reteaching and Identification of In-Class Interventions • Identifying Professional Development Considerations and Using PLCs Effectively for Tier 1 • Providing time for teams to begin planning for site implementation

  3. OVERVIEW AND REFRESHER FROM AUGUST CONFERENCE Conde Kunzman and Doreen Fuller

  4. Schools do make a difference. • Ron Edmonds, Lawrence Lezotte, Wilbur Brookover, Michael Rutter on Effective Schools • All children can learn! • Schools control the factors assuring that students master the core of the curriculum. • Robert Marzano, What Works in Schools (2003) • “An analysis of research conducted over a 35-year period demonstrates that schools that are highly effective produce results that almost entirely overcome the effects of student backgrounds.” • Douglas Reeves • 90─90─90 Schools C. Weber Presentation, August 2010

  5. Reading Statistics • 5% of children learn to read effortlessly • 20-30% learn relatively easily once exposed to reading instruction • For 60% of children learning to read is a much more formidable task • For at least 20-30% of children, reading is one of the most difficult tasks that they will have to master. • For 5% of students even with explicit and systematic instruction, reading will continue to be a challenge. MacKenzie (2000), citing statistics from Lyon, Kamme’enue, Simmons, et al.

  6. Research – MS and HS • Approximately two-thirds of eighth- and twelfth- grade students read at less than the “proficient” level as described by NAEP (National Institute for Literacy, 2006). • Approximately 32 percent of high school graduates are not ready for college-level English composition courses (ACT, 2005). • Over half of adults scoring at the lowest literacy levels are drop-outs and almost a quarter are high school graduates (NCES, 2005). • Approximately 40 percent of high school graduates lack the literacy skills employers seek (Achieve, Inc., 2005). • U.S. drop-outs’ literacy skills are lower than most industrialized nations, performing comparably only to Chile, Poland, Portugal and Slovenia (OECD, 2000). • A full 70 percent of U.S. middle and high school students require differentiated instruction—that is, instruction targeted to their individual strengths and weaknesses (Alliance for Excellent Education for the Carnegie Corporation of New York). C. Weber Presentation, August 2010

  7. For all students to learn, we must • Start with highly effective, research-based, differentiated core instruction. • Systematically identify students who are not succeeding in our core program. • Provide these students additional time and support until they learn. C. Weber Presentation, August 2010

  8. Sacramento County Office of Education

  9. Sacramento County Office of Education

  10. Sacramento County Office of Education

  11. RTI Framework A system that: • Provides high-quality instruction and intervention matched to student need • Monitors progress frequently to make decisions about change in instruction or learning goals • Applies student response data for making important educational decisions, including determining special education eligibility (Adapted from National Association of State Directors of Special Education, 2005)

  12. Tier 3: Intensive Interventions Tier 2: Supplemental Interventions Tier 1: Core Program

  13. Tier 3: Intensive Interventions Tier 2: Supplemental Interventions Tier 1: Core Program

  14. Tier 3: Intensive Interventions Tier 2: Supplemental Interventions Tier 1: Core Program

  15. Behavioral Systems Academic Systems • Tier 3: Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual students • Assessment-based • Intense, durable procedures • Tier 3: Intensive, Individual Interventions • Individual students • Assessment-based • High intensity • Of longer duration 1-5% 1-5% • Tier 2: Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response 5-10% • Tier 2: Targeted Group Interventions • Some students (at risk) • High efficiency • Rapid response 5-10% Students • Tier 1: Universal Interventions • All settings, all students • Preventive, proactive • Tier 1: Universal Interventions • All students • Preventive, proactive 80-90% 80-90% Three Tiered Model of School Supports C. Weber Presentation, August 2010

  16. Pyramid of Interventions TIER 4 SST DRIVEN LEARNING Increasing Intensity of Intervention Decreasing numbers of students • TIER 3 • INTENSIVE • INTERVENTIONS TIER 2 STRATEGIC INTERVENTIONS/ NEEDS BASED LEARNING FLUID GROUPS • TIER 1 • BENCHMARK RETEACHING IN • STANDARDS-BASED CLASSROOM LEARNING

  17. Why adopt an RTI model? • Because 34 CFR 300─306(b) tells us a child shall not be determined to be a child with a disability if the determinant factor is • Lack of appropriate instruction in reading (as defined by NCLB) • Lack of appropriate instruction in math • Limited English proficiency • Rather than a focus upon identification and placement, we needed a focus upon student outcomes. C. Weber Presentation, August 2010

  18. Core Principles • Do we really believe that: • All students can learn? • Effective instruction in general education is foundation for all decision-making? • Data should guide decisions regarding core, supplemental and comprehensive instruction/interventions? • Infrastructure for core, supplemental and comprehensive cycles must be evidence-based and integrated?

  19. RtI2 Core Principals ALL students are part of ONE proactive and responsive educational system: • Belief that we can effectively teach ALL students • Belief that ALL children can learn • Belief that failure can be avoided with prevention, stopped with early and effective intervention • Belief that early indicators of future problems are identifiable • Use of ALL available resources to teach ALL students • Belief that all students are everyone’s responsibility ACSA-CASP RtI Project 2008

  20. The BIG Ideas of RtI2 • Decide what is important for students to know • Teach what is important for students to know • Keep track of how students are doing • Make changes according to the results you collect

  21. Thoughts to Rememberfrom the Kennewick School District • “You can either fight assessment or embrace it. However, you cannot be a high-performance school without embracing assessment.” -Dave Montague, Principal Washington Elementary in Kennewick, WA • “Students who are behind do not learn faster than those who are ahead.” -Lynn Fielding, Board Member in Kennewick School District, WA

  22. Thoughts to Remember Perhaps the most important change in thinking that is needed to move all students toward proficiency in basic skills is framing ALL achievement problems in terms of variables that teachers control.

  23. UNDERSTANDING UNIVERSAL SCREENING AND INITIAL IDENTIFICATION Rita Mitchell

  24. Refers to a systematic process of detecting a subset of students from the entire student population who are struggling and are at-risk for experiencing a range of negative short- and long-term outcomes Rtl Universal Screening

  25. Goals of Screening • Fast, efficient, and respectful • Include all children and youth of interest

  26. Universal Screening Outcomes • Reduces discretion in teacher referral process • Each student identified must be served • Assess prevalence and build systems to match needs

  27. Universal Screening Outcomes • Process of finding the right customers • Decision Making Rules • Core, strategic, intensive tiers • Using cut scores

  28. l Assessments Cut Scores for First Grade

  29. Cut Scores for Fifth Grade

  30. Cut Scores Sixth, Seventh, Eighth Grade

  31. Activity • With your team or colleagues sitting near you, discuss the following questions. • If we were able to do universal screening across the grade levels in Academics what advantages would there be for: • Teachers? • Parents? • Students?

  32. DELIVERING QUALITY TEACHING OF CORE PROGRAMS WITH DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION & IN-CLASS MONITORING Rob Adams

  33. What do the experts call it? • How does your school go about making sure that your student have Guaranteed Curriculum or Challenging Goals or Effective Feedback?

  34. Familiar with the following events? • 1st grade class, children independently complete practice pages from a workbook • 4th grade class, students are assigned a writing prompt and have 30 minutes to respond • 8th grade class, students are told to read a particular textbook chapter and then answer the questions at the end of the chapter. • 9th grade algebra class, students are given 15 problems and told to work on them quietly in class and finish the problems for homework.

  35. Guaranteed Means….. • Time is variable based on student needs • Essential content is agreed upon by all • Essential content is organized and used by all • Highly Effective Instruction in all classrooms

  36. What is your Guaranteed Instruction? • Discuss the common instructional commitments that your school has made around instruction? • Learning goals? • CFU? • Engagement? • Other? • How do people know when they are doing it? Team Time 10 Minutes

  37. One model might look like… Debra Pickering Asilomar 2010

  38. The Art and Science of Teaching SEGMENTS ENACTED ON THE SPOT ROUTINE SEGMENTS CONTENT SPECIFIC SEGMENTS

  39. If school had such a Model/Language of Instruction… …when new ideas/products emerge…

  40. If school had such a Model/Language of Instruction… …when new ideas/products emerge…

  41. If school had such a Model/Language of Instruction… …when new ideas/products emerge…

  42. If school had such a Model/Language of Instruction… …when new ideas/products emerge…

  43. How do you develop this? • First, what areas of teacher expertise would you want to be included in your model of instruction? • Then, develop an agreed-upon common language/model of instruction. • Finally, develop criteria for evaluating each aspect of teacher expertise included in your model.

  44. Another Model • Areas of Expertise in model • Instructional Communication • Engagement • Direct Instruction • Classroom Management

  45. Another Model • Then, Develop an agreed-upon common language/model of instruction. • Finally, Develop criteria for evaluating each aspect of teacher expertise included in your model.