Download
power point for life n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Power Point For Life PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Power Point For Life

Power Point For Life

194 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Power Point For Life

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Power Point For Life By: Jasmine Burciaga

  2. Baby Nursery • Monkey Theme

  3. Baby Bed & Mattress • $209.99 • $79.99

  4. Car Seat • $249.99

  5. Stroller • $59.99

  6. Burping Baby

  7. How Do You Burp a Baby? • When burping your baby, repeated gentle patting on your baby's back should do the trick • Sit upright and hold your baby against your chest, or you can hold your baby sitting up, in your lap or across your knee. • You can also 3.Lay your baby on your lap on his or her belly. Support your baby's head and make sure it's higher than his or her chest. Gently pat your baby's back.

  8. How toBreast Feed? • Turn your baby's whole body toward you, chest to chest. • It's easiest to get started breastfeeding the first few times if you are sitting up. • Sit up in bed, in a comfortable armchair, or in a rocking chair.

  9. How to Breastfeed? • Pillows are a must: Use them behind your back, under your elbow, and on your lap to support the baby. • Use a footstool to bring your knees up or use pillows under your knees if you are sitting up in bed. • Pillows are a must: Use them behind your back, under your elbow, and on your lap to support the baby. • Use a footstool to bring your knees up or use pillows under your knees if you are sitting up in bed.

  10. How to Breastfeed? • Cradle hold – An easy, common hold that is comfortable for most mothers and babies. Hold your baby with his or her head on your forearm and his or her whole body facing yours. • Side-lying position – Useful for mothers who had a c-section or to help any mother get extra rest while the baby breastfeeds. Lie on your side with your baby facing you. Pull your baby close so your baby faces your body.

  11. How to Breastfeed? • Breastfeed as soon as possible after birth, then breastfeed at least 8 to 12 times every 24 hours to make plenty of milk for your baby. • This means that in the first few days after birth, your baby will likely need to breastfeed about every hour or two in the daytime and a couple of times at night. • This means that in the first few days after birth, your baby will likely need to breastfeed about every hour or two in the daytime and a couple of times at night.

  12. How to Diaper a Baby • Wash and dry your hands, or clean them with hand sanitizer or a baby wipe. • If you're not using a changing table, consider laying a blanket, towel, or changing mat on the floor or bed. • Grab your supplies, including a clean diaper and plenty of wipes or wet cloths. • For babies with sensitive skin, you can use lukewarm water and gauze

  13. How to Diaper a Baby • Open up a new clean diaper and place the back half (the half with tabs on either side) under your baby. • The top of the back half should come up to your baby's waist. Now the clean diaper is ready to go – and is there to protect your changing table from getting dirty

  14. How to Diaper a Baby • Unfasten the tabs on the dirty diaper. To prevent them from sticking to your baby, fold them over. • If there's poop in the diaper, use the front half of the diaper to wipe the bulk of it off your baby's bottom • Wash your hands after you clean its bottom. • Fold the dirty diaper in half under your baby, clean side up. • Clean your baby's front with a damp baby wipe, cloth, or gauze. • Remove the dirty diaper and set it aside

  15. How to Diaper a Baby • If you followed step one, the clean one should be underneath your baby, ready to go. • Pull the front half of the clean diaper up to your baby's tummy. • Make sure that the part of the diaper between your baby's legs is spread as wide as seems comfortable. • Fasten the diaper at both sides with the tabs. • Wash your hands when your done.

  16. Reflexes Definition • A reflex is an involuntary muscle reaction to a certain type of stimulation. Certain sensations or movements are known to produce specific muscular responses.

  17. Rooting Reflexes • a normal response in newborns when the cheek is touched or stroked along the side of the mouth to turn the head toward the stimulated side and begin to suck. The reflex disappears by 3 to 4 months of age but in some infants may persist until 12 months of age

  18. Palmar Grasp • The palmar grasp reflex appears at birth and persists until five or six months of age. When an object is placed in the infant's hand and strokes their palm, the fingers will close and they will grasp it.

  19. Moro • A reflex is a type of involuntary (without trying) response to stimulation. The Moro reflex is one of many reflexes that are seen at birth. It normally disappears after 3 or 4 months.

  20. Babinski Reflex • An extension of the great toe, sometimes with fanning of the other toes, in response to stroking of the sole of the foot. It is a normal reflex in infants, but it is usually associated with a disturbance of the pyramidal tract in children and adults.

  21. Stepping Reflex • The walking or stepping reflex is present at birth; though infants this young can not support their own weight, when the soles of their feet touch a flat surface they will attempt to 'walk' by placing one foot in front of the other. This reflex disappears at 6 weeks due to an increased ratio of leg weight to strength.

  22. FTT • Failure to thrive. • used in both pediatric and adult medicine, as well as veterinary medicine • indicates insufficient weight gain or inappropriate weight loss.

  23. SIDS • Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the unexpected, sudden death of a child under age 1 in which an autopsy does not show an explainable cause of death. • The following have been linked to a baby's increased risk of SIDS: • Sleeping on the stomach • Being around cigarette smoke while in the womb or after being born • Sleeping in the same bed as their parents (co-sleeping) • Soft bedding in the crib

  24. Toy that develops gross motor skill • Obstacle Course-Strengthen your baby's trunk and arms by creating an obstacle course for her to maneuver. • Bounce Along to Music-Combine two of many babies' favorite activities---music and bouncing---into an interactive activity that builds leg and trunk strength.

  25. Toy that develops fine motor skills • Have your baby work for his or her meal. Pulling cooled noodles apart is a tremendous way to practice using his or her fingers. • To promote wrist movements, use colorful wristbands with bells attached to the wrists. Banging, mouthing, and shaking objects helps encourage wrist movements • To promote banging objects for play, offer items such as a spoon, rattle, tray, pot, or pans. Bang a squeak toy against a table.

  26. Toy to enhance self awerness • Mirrors

  27. Anatomy of the brain

  28. Frontal Lobe • The frontal lobes are one of the four main lobes or regions of the cerebral cortex. They are positioned at the frontmost region of the cerebral cortex and are involved in movement, decision-making, problem solving, and planning. There are three main divisions of the frontal lobes. They are the prefrontal cortex, the premotor area and the motor area

  29. Parietal Lobe • •The parietal lobes are superior to the occipital lobes and posterior to the central sulcus (fissure) and frontal lobes. • FUNCTIONS: • Cognition • Information Processing • Pain and Touch Sensation • Spatial Orientation • Speech • Visual Perception

  30. Temporal Lobe • The temporal lobes are one of the four main lobes or regions of the cerebral cortex. Structures of the limbic system, including the olfactory cortex, amygdala, and the hippocampus are located within the temporal lobes. The temporal lobes play an important role in organizing sensory input, auditory perception, language and speech production, as well as memory association and formation.

  31. Occipital Lobe • The occipital lobes are one of the four main lobes or regions of the cerebral cortex. They are positioned at the back region of the cerebral cortex and are the main centers for visual processing. In addition to the occipital lobes, posterior portions of the parietal lobes and temporal lobes are also involved in visual perception. Located within the occipital lobes is the primary visual cortex.

  32. Left Brain Characteristics • Responds to verbal instructions • Problem solves by logically and sequentially looking at the parts of things • Looks at differences • Is planned and structured • Prefers established, certain information • Prefers talking and writing • Prefers multiple choice tests • Controls feelings • Prefers ranked authority structures

  33. Right Brain Characteristics • Responds to demonstrated instructions • Problem solves with hunches, looking for patterns and configurations • Looks at similarities • Is fluid and spontaneous • Prefers elusive, uncertain information • Prefers drawing and manipulating objects • Prefers open ended questions • Free with feelings • Prefers collegial authority structures

  34. Piaget • was a French-speaking Swiss developmental psychologist and philosopher known for his epistemological studies with children. • Piaget placed great importance on the education of children • He was the eldest son of Arthur Piaget (Swiss) and Rebecca Jackson (French). His theory of cognitive development and epistemological view are together called "genetic epistemology".

  35. A Career Working with Children • Teacher

  36. Job Discription • Becoming a teacher is one of the most oft-chosen paths for those wishing to pursue a career working with children. Teaching requires patience, flexibility and an even temper, but for those who can handle it, teaching can be a highly rewarding career. • The role of teacher is often formal and ongoing, carried out at a school or other place of formal education

  37. Salary Range • Starting Salary:$41,640 • Average Salary: $52,815