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OUTLINE PowerPoint Presentation

OUTLINE

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OUTLINE

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  1. OUTLINE • Introduction • The Agents of Metamorphism • The Three Types of Metamorphism • The Classification of Metamorphic Rocks • Metamorphic Zones • Metamorphism and Plate Tectonics • Metamorphism and Natural Resources • Geo-Recap

  2. OBJECTIVES 1 Metamorphic rocks result from the transformation of other rocks by various processes occurring beneath Earth’s surface. 2 Heat, pressure, and fluid activity are the three agents of metamorphism. 3 Contact, dynamic, and regional metamorphism are the three types of metamorphism. 4 Metamorphic rocks are typically divided into two groups, primarily on the basis of texture. 5 Metamorphic rocks with a foliated texture include slate, phyllite, schist, gneiss, and amphibolite. 6 Metamorphic rocks with a nonfoliated texture include marble, quartzite, greenstone, and hornfels. 7 Metamorphic rocks can be grouped into metamorphic zones based on the presence of index minerals that form under specific temperature and pressure conditions.

  3. OBJECTIVES 8 The appearance of particular index minerals results from increasing metamorphic intensity. 9 Metamorphism is associated with all three types of plate boundaries but is most widespread along convergent plate boundaries. 10 Many metamorphic minerals and rocks are valuable metallic ores, building materials, and gemstones.

  4. Fig. 8-CO, p. 166

  5. Fig. 8-1, p. 168

  6. Fig. 8-2, p. 168

  7. Fig. 8-3, p. 169

  8. Fig. 8-4, p. 170

  9. Fig. 8-5, p. 172

  10. Fig. 8-6, p. 172

  11. Fig. 8-7, p. 173

  12. Fig. 8-8, p. 174

  13. Fig. 8-9, p. 174

  14. Table 8-1, p. 175

  15. Fig. 8-10, p. 176

  16. Fig. 8-10a, p. 176

  17. Fig. 8-10b, p. 176

  18. Fig. 8-11a, p. 176

  19. Fig. 8-11b, p. 176

  20. Fig. 8-11c, p. 176

  21. Fig. 8-12, p. 177

  22. Fig. 8-13, p. 178

  23. Fig. 8-14, p. 178

  24. Fig. 8-15, p. 179

  25. Fig. 8-16, p. 179

  26. Fig. 8-17, p. 180

  27. Fig. 8-18, p. 180

  28. Fig. 8-19, p. 181

  29. Fig. 8-20, p. 181

  30. Table 8-2, p. 182

  31. SUMMARY • Metamorphic rocks result from the transformation of other rocks, usually beneath Earth’s surface, as a consequence of one or a combination of three agents: heat, pressure, and fluid activity. • Heat for metamorphism comes from intrusive or extrusive magmas or deep burial. Pressure is either lithostatic or differential. Fluids trapped in sedimentary rocks or emanating from intruding magmas can enhance chemical changes and the formation of new minerals. • The three major types of metamorphism are contact, dynamic, and regional. • Metamorphic rocks are primarily classified according to their texture. In a foliated texture, platy and elongate minerals have a preferred orientation. A nonfoliated texture does not exhibit any discernable preferred orientation of the mineral grains. • Foliated metamorphic rocks can be arranged in order of grain size and/or perfection of their foliation. Slate is fine grained, followed by phyllite and schist; gneiss displays segregated bands of minerals. Amphibolite is another fairly common foliated metamorphic rock.

  32. SUMMARY • Marble, quartzite, greenstone, and hornfels are common nonfoliated metamorphic rocks. • Metamorphic rocks can be arranged into metamorphic zones based on the conditions of metamorphism. Index minerals result from increasing metamorphic intensity. • Metamorphism can occur along all three types of plate boundaries but most commonly occurs at convergent plate margins. • Metamorphic rocks formed near Earth’s surface along an oceanic–continental plate boundary result from low-temperature, high-pressure conditions. As a subducted oceanic plate descends, it is subjected to increasingly higher temperatures and pressures that result in higher-grade metamorphism. • Many metamorphic rocks and minerals, such as marble, slate, graphite, talc, and asbestos, are valuable natural resources.