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Transparency International s Anti-Corruption Tools Finn Heinrich Research Director Transparency International Secretari PowerPoint Presentation
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Transparency International s Anti-Corruption Tools Finn Heinrich Research Director Transparency International Secretari

Transparency International s Anti-Corruption Tools Finn Heinrich Research Director Transparency International Secretari

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Transparency International s Anti-Corruption Tools Finn Heinrich Research Director Transparency International Secretari

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    2. Overview of Presentation What is Transparency International? How we work? Key tools: - Development Pacts - Advocacy & Legal Advice Centres - Research tools: CPI, GCB, NIS 4. How can TI tools help in addressing corruption in Lithuania?

    3. Transparency International: the global movement against corruption Established in 1993 Approximately 100 National Chapters and contact groups worldwide International Secretariat in Berlin, Germany Funding from government, foundations, private sector national chapters funded independently

    4. And how chapters become chapters (member accreditation process)And how chapters become chapters (member accreditation process)

    5. How does TI define corruption? Corruption is The abuse of entrusted power for private gain

    6. How does Transparency International work? Generates research and information on corruption (indices and reports) Empowers citizens and protects their rights (legal advice centres) Creates public awareness by demonstrating the devastating impact of corruption (media and education) Advocates for government and private sector reform and adoption of higher standards (advocacy tools and actions) Monitors implementation of laws and practices (monitoring tools and actions)

    7. What is unique about TIs approach? Holistic and systemic: fighting corruption at its roots Coalitions built across all sectors No investigations Politically non-partisan Combination of local and international expertise

    8. TI Approaches to Anti-Corruption In Theory Raise awareness > Public Information & Education Diagnose & monitor -> Research Engage -> Coalition-building Advocate -> Policy Change Assist -> Advice & Training

    9. In Practice: A Combination of Multiple Approaches Evidence-based advocacy Participatory action research Multi-stakeholder engagements Citizen empowerment & systemic change

    10. Development Pacts Pacts are public agreements between duty-bearers & right-holders They aim to improve: Public accountability in the decision-making on public resources Access to & quality of public goods and services More precisely, Pacts are: Public agreements between High-level committed political or administrative champions or institutions & Organised constituencies of the poor Containing specific & time-bound commitments to improve: Access & quality of public goods and services prioritized by the poor & Measures to ensure the integrity of public decision-making (manifestos, policies, budgets, institutional arrangements, implementation etc.) Benefits for public officials/institutions: Credible public reputations of integrity and performance and the support of an important constituency disadvantaged groups that can lead to the advancement of political and administrative careers Benefits for disadvantaged populations: Tangible benefits in their lives through the corruption-free implementation of poverty reduction programs and the provision of basic infrastructure and public services. More precisely, Pacts are: Public agreements between High-level committed political or administrative champions or institutions & Organised constituencies of the poor Containing specific & time-bound commitments to improve: Access & quality of public goods and services prioritized by the poor & Measures to ensure the integrity of public decision-making (manifestos, policies, budgets, institutional arrangements, implementation etc.) Benefits for public officials/institutions: Credible public reputations of integrity and performance and the support of an important constituency disadvantaged groups that can lead to the advancement of political and administrative careers Benefits for disadvantaged populations: Tangible benefits in their lives through the corruption-free implementation of poverty reduction programs and the provision of basic infrastructure and public services.

    11. When do Pacts make sense? Pacts are only useful: If they add value to an existing set of tools to engage citizens & public officials When they are chosen after a review of other options They only work in locations / countries: With some scope for citizen participation & some level of civil society presence Where public officials can benefit from reputations of greater integrity Pacts are a collective effort. They depend on the presence of civil society actors and community-based organisations. They need to link to other tools that can help in diagnosis, in monitoring, and in advocacy. These can include TI tools such as risk-maps and a range of social accountability tools community score cards, social audits, sms based monitoring etc. The process of discussing Pacts, must leave the option of going for other tools. The Pact may NOT be the most appropriate tool for the local situation. There may be a BETTER local idea to solve the local problem. The PACT may need to be ADAPTED / CHANGED or just serve as a starting point for better LOCAL solution. It is essential that there are some provisions for citizen participation in the political process and in development planning. In most countries these provisions are increasing while implementation lags behind. Pacts make existing provisions for citizen participation move from paper to action and come alive. Pacts are incentive-based tools. They make sense, when the key partners, directly benefit. Service providers, local governments and elected leaders have chosen the pact for the improved image, respect, credibility and reputation that comes with greater public accountability. Communities engage on the Pact only if it has a direct link to their lives and livelihoods: In terms of improved services, local infrastructure, or access to decisions that affect them. A very immediate benefit is often a more service-oriented and respectful attitude of public officials to citizens. This alone has been rated highly by communities.Pacts are a collective effort. They depend on the presence of civil society actors and community-based organisations. They need to link to other tools that can help in diagnosis, in monitoring, and in advocacy. These can include TI tools such as risk-maps and a range of social accountability tools community score cards, social audits, sms based monitoring etc. The process of discussing Pacts, must leave the option of going for other tools. The Pact may NOT be the most appropriate tool for the local situation. There may be a BETTER local idea to solve the local problem. The PACT may need to be ADAPTED / CHANGED or just serve as a starting point for better LOCAL solution. It is essential that there are some provisions for citizen participation in the political process and in development planning. In most countries these provisions are increasing while implementation lags behind. Pacts make existing provisions for citizen participation move from paper to action and come alive. Pacts are incentive-based tools. They make sense, when the key partners, directly benefit. Service providers, local governments and elected leaders have chosen the pact for the improved image, respect, credibility and reputation that comes with greater public accountability. Communities engage on the Pact only if it has a direct link to their lives and livelihoods: In terms of improved services, local infrastructure, or access to decisions that affect them. A very immediate benefit is often a more service-oriented and respectful attitude of public officials to citizens. This alone has been rated highly by communities.

    12. What makes DPs a TI tool? Creating a win-win situation (Islands of Integrity, IPs) Using the opportunity-led approach Working through coalitions Leveraging political access Working through reputational incentives Examples: TI Nepals Bhaktapur initiative, TI Indonesias MoUs with entire administrations, Koreas K-Pacts In addition, Pacts also build on Chapter initiatives addressing citizen concerns: TIBs Committees of Concerned Citizens (CCCs), Face the Public platforms (FTPs) & Citizens Expectations survey, TIZs community board initiatives & APNAC, TIKs CSO dialogues. etc. Examples: TI Nepals Bhaktapur initiative, TI Indonesias MoUs with entire administrations, Koreas K-Pacts In addition, Pacts also build on Chapter initiatives addressing citizen concerns: TIBs Committees of Concerned Citizens (CCCs), Face the Public platforms (FTPs) & Citizens Expectations survey, TIZs community board initiatives & APNAC, TIKs CSO dialogues. etc.

    13. Current use of DP By public officials / institutions At political level: National & local, legislative & executive, individual & collective At administrative levels: Administrative heads (district or sector institutions) By communities: Resident Committees, Water associations, Community-level citizen groups and sub-committees On Disclosure of budgets, participation and contributions to planning and execution of local priorities, oversight over construction, supplies, service delivery etc. Pacts build on trends: The relevance and aspirations of the (political) constituency of the poor with increasing democratisation and decentralisation Existing good institutional and actor (Champion) related opportunities in every country, at every level, across sectors Existing opportunities for upstream participation and downstream monitoring in a responsive framework Pacts create opportunities for partnerships: Based on complementarities with development NGOs, governments and others essential for a collective anti-corruption effort. Pacts build on trends: The relevance and aspirations of the (political) constituency of the poor with increasing democratisation and decentralisation Existing good institutional and actor (Champion) related opportunities in every country, at every level, across sectors Existing opportunities for upstream participation and downstream monitoring in a responsive framework Pacts create opportunities for partnerships: Based on complementarities with development NGOs, governments and others essential for a collective anti-corruption effort.

    14. Chapter statements on impacts Public officials are listening and have become more responsive to peoples needs Communities have a sense of their power through the pact dialogue Citizen groups involved in the pacts, share these with other communities More information is disclosed on the available budget at local government levels and its use There is a perception of reduced resource leakage Peoples expectations are moving from quantity to quality in the delivery of public services

    15. Impact statements contd. Pacts highlight limitations of public officials and institutions at local levels Local government officials use the Pact to improve transfers from the central level Ministries are cooperating with the Chapter and passing on budget figures to prevent leakages on the way to the local level There is increased apprehension among the corrupt Potential impact statements linked to the strategic objectives of TI 2015 People: DPs mobilise citizen engagement by demonstrating a measurable impact of fighting corruption on their lives and livelihoods. They provide a responsive framework by rewarding individual / collective citizen actions. DPs create a framework of inclusion for disadvantaged groups in shaping and benefiting from societal development and economic growth. These can be youth, women, farmers, tribes Coalitions: DPs are attractive for coalitions, since they bring together complementary efforts under a set of shared objectives. DPs allow TIs reputation and convening power to become relevant to development NGOs, political leaders and public administrations. DPs create a multi-stakeholder framework and process towards shared objectives of fighting poverty and corruption. Leaders / Institutions / Values: DPs create role models at individual and institutional levels that trigger emulation. Role models can be listed and their multiplier effect assessed through requests for support in the replication of Pacts / the application of Pact benchmarks elsewhere. Or in the use of the Pacts without direct TI intervention. Pacts can lead to associations of Champions creating more chances for change replication (APNAC). Potential impact statements linked to the strategic objectives of TI 2015 People: DPs mobilise citizen engagement by demonstrating a measurable impact of fighting corruption on their lives and livelihoods. They provide a responsive framework by rewarding individual / collective citizen actions. DPs create a framework of inclusion for disadvantaged groups in shaping and benefiting from societal development and economic growth. These can be youth, women, farmers, tribes Coalitions: DPs are attractive for coalitions, since they bring together complementary efforts under a set of shared objectives. DPs allow TIs reputation and convening power to become relevant to development NGOs, political leaders and public administrations. DPs create a multi-stakeholder framework and process towards shared objectives of fighting poverty and corruption. Leaders / Institutions / Values: DPs create role models at individual and institutional levels that trigger emulation. Role models can be listed and their multiplier effect assessed through requests for support in the replication of Pacts / the application of Pact benchmarks elsewhere. Or in the use of the Pacts without direct TI intervention. Pacts can lead to associations of Champions creating more chances for change replication (APNAC).

    18. DATE, PLACE

    19. IACC brings together 1500 members of the anti-corruption movement every two years to foster discussion and debate Integrity Awards launched in 2000, recognizes the bravery and courage of anti-corruption activists. Past winners have been investigative journalists, judges, and whistleblowers, for example.IACC brings together 1500 members of the anti-corruption movement every two years to foster discussion and debate Integrity Awards launched in 2000, recognizes the bravery and courage of anti-corruption activists. Past winners have been investigative journalists, judges, and whistleblowers, for example.

    20. Data Collection and Analysis Cooperation and Collaboration Advocacy Data Collection and Analysis Cooperation and Collaboration Advocacy

    21. Judicial, Property Rights, Public ProcurementJudicial, Property Rights, Public Procurement

    22. Data Collection and Analysis Cooperation and Collaboration Advocacy Data Collection and Analysis Cooperation and Collaboration Advocacy

    23. Data Collection and Analysis Cooperation and Collaboration Advocacy Data Collection and Analysis Cooperation and Collaboration Advocacy

    24. Conservative FiguresConservative Figures

    25. Cases the ALACs deal with vary enormously: From small- (e.g., small business licensing) to large-scale ( millions) Across sectors (e.g., businesses, health, education, environment) Cases the ALACs deal with vary enormously: From small- (e.g., small business licensing) to large-scale ( millions) Across sectors (e.g., businesses, health, education, environment)