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Internal Coach Training

Internal Coach Training

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Internal Coach Training

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  1. Internal Coach Training Norman Public Schools November 2, 2009

  2. Agenda for Today • 321 Activity • Active Supervision • Dealing with Difficult Students • SET Results 2009 • Data Driven Decision Making : Social Skills • “Vision” Activity

  3. 3 – 2 – 1 Activity • 3 things you’ve done as an internal coach • 2 PBS challenges at your campus • 1 outcome or expectation for the day!

  4. Dealing with Difficult Students

  5. Non-compliance Looks Different for Different Students • Active Resistance • Passive Resistance • Failure to Understand a Teacher Directive • Impulsivity and • Hyperactivity • Negotiation Students rarely come across in only one of these ways, but a combination.

  6. Active Resistance • Skilled in setting up power struggles • Body language, volume…we back off • Have a little respect for authority • Walking away when student making bad choice = encouraging the behavior • If you don’t know the student, at least label the behavior • Least you know a student, the least you can push them • Giving/receiving feedback problematic • Audience influences student

  7. “I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it.” -Charles R. Swindoll

  8. Pre-teach • looks like • Sounds like Pre-correct • Pattern? • Time of day? • Antecedent behavior? • Goes off? Intervene • Behavior is already happening

  9. Passive Resistance • Ignores directives and typically refuses to respond • Does not express anger or show signs of emotion Small steps build on the “Yeses”

  10. Failure to Understand Teacher Directives • Often receptive/expressive language delay • Inconsistently follows directions • Didn’t hear, pretending, follows • Need time to respond • Check for understanding before develop negative pattern • Pre-correct potential for transitions

  11. Some children don’t understand time (“In about a minute”) • Language is an issue • They don’t understand your jokes • Remember (break it down) • Walk and talk, get to class

  12. Impulsivity and Hyperactivity • Frequency is exhausting • Average person attends 8 minutes • Student’s noncompliant behavior is often unintentional • Do not comply because they lack impulse control Practice active participation Structures they can count on Parameters without confinement Feedback is critical

  13. Impulsivity and Hyperactivity • Frequency is exhausting • Average person attends 8 minutes • Student’s noncompliant behavior is often unintentional • Do not comply because they lack impulse control Practice active participation Structures they can count on Parameters without confinement Feedback is critical

  14. Negotiation • Traps teacher/staff • Derail • Delay • Avoid • Control Don’t engage! Don’t ask questions! Clear limits! “Moving on…” “Maybe so…” “It’s not the time”…point to watch Ignore

  15. Four motivations for Misbehavior • Attention • Power/control • Sense of helplessness/display of inadequacy • Revenge Rudolf Dreikur, based on Adlerian Theory (Alfred Adler)

  16. Students who cannot or who believe they cannot become very skilled at making it appear that they will not. What Do Dou Do With a Child Like This? Inside the Lives of Troubled Children by L. Tobin

  17. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Some psychologists have added a further layer for Beliefs and Spirituality

  18. Communicate Appropriately • It takes 30 seconds to make a first impression! • It takes approximately 20 additional encounters to undo or change a bad first impression! Dr. Mehrelbin, UCLA (Capturing Kids’ Hearts)

  19. The Importance of Language

  20. The Importance of Language • 55% Body language • 38% Tone of Voice • 7% Words Dr. Mehrelbin, UCLA (Capturing Kids’ Hearts)

  21. Ratio of Interactions • Understand how important it is for you to interact with each student at least 3 times more when they are behaving than misbehaving • Watch for the tendency to fall into the criticism trap

  22. Positive Feedback • The feedback must be accurate • The feedback must be specific and descriptive • The feedback should be contingent • The feedback should be age appropriate • The feedback must be given in a manner that fits your personal style

  23. The Four Questions for Dealing with Misbehavior • Excuse me, (name), what are you doing? • What are you supposed to be doing? • Were you doing it? • What are you going to do about it? • Affirm Dr. Mehrelbin, UCLA (Capturing Kids’ Hearts)

  24. Making the Questions Work For You: • Ask two times • Get quiet and wait for emotional shift • Affirmation • “You may either answer the question appropriately, or you choose to (consequence)” • Either move to the next question or deliver the consequence. Dr. Mehrelbin, UCLA (Capturing Kids’ Hearts)

  25. Behave In/Behave Out • You cannot appropriately deal with misbehavior if your button is pushed. Our goal is to de-escalate behavior and hold the student accountable. • Use questions sequentially • Do not lecture • No bailing • Don’t add questions • Be consistent in how you ask questions (ask questions the same way with all kids in any situation) Dr. Mehrelbin, UCLA (Capturing Kids’ Hearts)

  26. Role Play • Find a partner in your table group or from a nearby table • Take turns being student and teacher • Role play 4 questions with an easy scenario and a fairly compliant student • Once you have role played both parts with your partner, change partners and repeat process • After second partner role plays, return to your seat

  27. Precision Requests • Start with, “It’s time to do your math.” • If a second request is needed, use the keyword, “need.” • If the request is followed, use a social reinforcer. (praise) • If the request is not followed, immediately use a mild pre-planned negative consequence • After the negative consequence has been delivered, repeat request cycle again. Do not take the consequence away! Best Practices

  28. Role Play • Find a partner in your table group or from a nearby table • Take turns being student and teacher • Role play four questions with an easy scenario and a fairly compliant student • Once you have role played both parts with your partner, change partners and repeat the process • After your second partner role play, return to your seat

  29. Pick your battles! What is it you want?

  30. School-wide Evaluation Tool (SET)

  31. Data Driven Decision-Making: Social Skills

  32. Indicators: Universal • Total referrals per year per student is high • Average number of referrals per day is high Universal

  33. Indicators: Selected or Targeted • Proportion of students with 0-1 referrals is low, but proportion of students with 2-10 is high • Students have received >10 referrals • 5% of students with most office referrals account for high percentage of all referrals • High frequency of suspensions/expulsions Targeted Selected

  34. Teaching Expected Behavior Show Tell Practice

  35. Comprehensive Intervention Plan Follow-up Crisis response Interruption Prevention

  36. Phase 1: Prevention Prevention Intent = increase the likelihood that the student(s) will productively and successfully engage in class and school activities

  37. Prevention Strategies Study Skills Classroom space Practical schedule Instruction Proactive behavior system Social skills Classroom routines Expectations

  38. Teaching Study Skills Repeated disciplinary exclusions from instruction keep students from learning many specific learning strategies, or study skills, necessary for success in school. —Geoff Colvin

  39. Teaching Social Skills Social competence is predictive of long term psychological, social adjustment and success in school.

  40. Comprehensive Social Skills Programs • Understand and define terms • Review key research assumptions • Assess social skills • Provide systematic classroom instruction • Utilize social skills curriculum resources

  41. Social Skills Instruction • Modeling • Role Play • Performance Feedback • Transfer of Training

  42. Skillstreaming:The Hidden Ingredient to Success

  43. What are social skills? • Interpersonal behaviors that allow an individual to interact with others successfully.

  44. Characteristics of social skills deficits: • Unable to attend to class/task • Makes negative comments to peers • Negative self-concept (worthless) • High level of frustration • Lacks sensitivity toward others

  45. What the experts say… • Children with poor interpersonal skills are at risk later in life for problems (Quay, 1979) • Social competence in preschool children can predict academic achievement in elementary children • New demands for change—Kindergarten children must now learn to get along with entire class, not just mom and dad • Early years are the most important times to teach prosocial behaviors (Maccoby, 1980)

  46. Interaction • Student academic success relates to his/her ability to interact with • Others • Environment

  47. Assumption Many educators teach with the assumption that the skills are perceived and learned informally

  48. Appropriateness • Research provides statistics that show some students with disabilities LACK the ability to perceive appropriate ways to interact

  49. Types of Social Skills Deficits: • Skill Deficits • Problem: the student does not have the skill in his/her behavioral repertoire • Method: direct instruction, model, and observation (ex. Bat mitzvah) • Performance Deficits • Problem: the student has the behavior, but does not use it due to lack of enforcement • Method: manipulate antecedents through peer initiation • Self Control Deficits • Problem: the student lacks the control necessary to inhibit inappropriate behaviors • Method: behavior modification techniques