Download
developing assessment plans that work n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Developing Assessment Plans that Work PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Developing Assessment Plans that Work

Developing Assessment Plans that Work

147 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Developing Assessment Plans that Work

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Quality Assessment Program Program Assessment and Evaluation Matrix What we need to Accomplish? ABET, What we have do First? What is Urgent Now? Whose responsibility? Program Workshops to help your faculty use assessment to improve teaching and learning  September 2005 WEB PAGE Self-study report A list of 206 Accredited Computing Programs Developing Assessment Plans that Work

  2. What are we trying to do? Review/Develop Assess/Evaluate Document Results Incorporate results Continuously Improve Satisfy customers Satisfy ABET Continue/Stop How well can we do it? A comprehensive, systematic, ongoing cycle of assessment is crucial to continuous improvement Understand the purpose of assessment is not to compare programs, to point fingers at programmatic problems, or to publish scorecards. Quality assessment promotes continuous improvement at all levels of the university by providing the necessary evidence to guide effective decision making in many areas--programmatic changes, classroom teaching modifications, support service modifications, policy or procedure changes, structural reorganization. How can we improve what we are doing? Believe in it Do yours Cooperate Help other Successful assessment Flows from the institution's mission and educational purposes. Emerges from organized conceptual framework. Is marked by faculty ownership and responsibility. Has institution-wide support. Relies on multiple measures. Provides feedback to students and the institution. Is cost-effective. Does not restrict or inhibit goals of access, equity, and diversity established by the institution. Leads to improvement. Includes a process for evaluating the assessment program. ABET: Quality Assessment Program

  3. UOB Mission & Goals Electronic Assessment Database Concept Assessment Plan College of Engineering Mission & Goals Curricular Issues 2 Implementation 3 Database Constituency Feedback Constituency Feedback 4 Interpretation of Effectiveness & Improvements 1 Program’s Mission PEO’s & PO’s

  4. Goals: What are the overall goals of the program? How do they complement institutional and accreditation expectations? Program Objectives: What are the program objectives? What should your students know and be able to do? Performance Criteria: How will you know the objectives have been met? What level of performance meets each objective? Implementation Strategy: How will the objectives be met? What program activities (curricular and co-curricular) help you meet each objective? Evaluation Methods: What assessment methods will you use to collect data? How will you interpret and evaluate the data? Logistics: When will you measure? How often? Who will collect and interpret the data and report the results? Feedback: Who needs to know the results? How can you convince them the objectives were met? How can you improve your program and your assessment process? Program Assessment and Evaluation Matrix

  5. General ABET Criteria 3. Program Outcomes and Assessment • Assessment Process with Documented Results to Measure Outcomes • Results Applied to Improvement of the Program • Demonstration (incl. Process & Measurements) that Graduates have: • ability to apply knowledge of math, engineering, and science • ability to design and conduct experiments as well as to analyze and interpret data • ability to design system, component or process to meet needs • ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams • ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problem • understanding of professional and ethical responsibility • ability to communicate effectively • Broad education • recognition of need and ability to engage in life-long learning • knowledge of contemporary issues • ability to use techniques, skills, and tools in engineering practice • Students • Admit • Advise • Evaluate • Monitor 2. Program Educational Objective • Published and Consistent with Mission and These Criteria • Process in Place to Determine and Periodically Evaluate • Based on of ConstituenciesCurriculum and processes to ensure achievement • Evaluation to Determine Achievement • Results Used to Improve Effectiveness of the Program

  6. General ABET Criteria 4. Professional Component • Major Design Experience • One year of Mathematics and Basic Science • One and one-half Years on Engineering Topics • General Education Component, Consistent with Program Objectives 5. Faculty • Sufficient Number and Competencies to Cover All Curricular Areas (FTE) • Levels of Student- Faculty Interaction • Advise and Counsel students • Actively involve in service (College & University) • Interact with Practitioners and Employers • Professional development • Monitor and evaluate effectively 6. Facilities • Classrooms • Laboratories • Equipment and Tools • Computing and Information • Infrastructure • Certified Technicians and qualified operators 7. Institutional Support & Financial Resources • Sufficient to Assure Quality and Continuity of the Program • Sufficient to Attract and Retain a Well-Qualified Faculty • Sufficient to Acquire, Maintain, and Operate Facilities and Equipment 8. Program Criteria • Curricular Topics • Faculty Qualifications • Other

  7. CS ABET Criteria • Objectives and Assessments (ABET #2 & 3) The program has documented, measurable objectives, including expected outcomes for graduates. The program regularly assesses its progress against its objectives and uses the results of the assessments to identify program improvements and to modify the program’s objectives. • Student Support (ABET #1) Students can complete the program in a reasonable amount of time. Students have ample opportunity to interact with their instructors. Students are offered timely guidance and advice about the program’s requirements and their career alternatives. Students who graduate the program meet all program requirements. • Faculty (ABET #5) Faculty members are current and active in the discipline and have the necessary technical breadth and depth to support a modern computer science program. There are enough faculty members to provide continuity and stability, to cover the curriculum reasonably, and to allow an appropriate mix of teaching and scholarly activity. • Curriculum (ABET#4,8) The curriculum is consistent with the program's Documented objectives. It combines technical requirements with general education requirements and electives to prepare students for a professional career in the computer field, for Further study in computer science, and for functioning in modern society. The technical requirements include up-to date coverage of basic and advanced topics in computer science as well as an emphasis on science and mathematics. • Laboratories and Computing Facilities (ABET # 6) Laboratories and computing facilities are available, accessible, and adequately supported to enable students to complete their course work and to support faculty teaching needs and scholarly activities.

  8. CS ABET Criteria • Institutional Support and Financial Resources (ABET #7) The institution’s support for the program and the Financial resources available to the program are sufficient to provide an environment in which the program can achieve its objectives. Support and resources are sufficient to provide assurance that the program will retain its strength throughout the period of accreditation. • Institutional Facilities (ABET #6 ) Institutional facilities including the library, other electronic information retrieval systems, computer networks, classrooms, and offices are adequate to support the objectives of the program.

  9. Departmental Accreditation Committee (DAC) Program’s Mission Program Constituencies  Program Educational Objectives (PEO’s) Program Outcomes (PO’s) Program Industrial Advisory Committee (PIAC). Program ABET Web Page. Electronic Assessment Database. Plan of Improvement & Assessment (PIA) Develop performance criteria for each objective/outcome. Conduct Assessments and Write Up Results Document Use of Results & Incorporated into Program Improvement What We Have To Do First?

  10. Example Mission To prepare intellectual, professional, and ethical graduates, capable of meeting challenges in the field of Computer Science; and to coordinate with other parts of the university to facilitate the effective use of educational resources, including courses Program’s Mission

  11. Example Mission The mission of the Department of Computer Science is four-fold: To conduct scholarly research. To provide an instructional environment that leads to careers and research in computer science and information systems. To contribute to the liberal education mission of the University. To serve the community, the Kingdom, region, and the profession. Program’s Mission

  12. Program’s Mission Program’s Mission Example Mission The mission of the Department of Computer Science is: 1. To produce graduates with a strong grasp of fundamentals of computer science, knowledge in technical specialty areas, and an appreciation of the power of collaborative effort applied to problem solving. 2. To offer courses and programs which stimulate innovation and enhance the ability of graduates to achieve high levels of professional development and to succeed in a competitive marketplace. 3. To conduct research in selected areas and to integrate research results with teaching activities. 4. To provide service to the profession and community and forge strategic alliances with other professions.

  13. PEO’s are consistent with the mission Ensure that PEO’s are well-stated and measurable. PEO’s can be linked with the curriculum for the Program Involve constituencies Program Educational Objectives (PEO’s)

  14. Example PEO’s (CS) The program objectives are as follows: Graduates will have an understanding of the fundamental mathematical, logical, statistical and scientific principles underlying computing and information processing. Graduates will have a solid foundation in the principles of computer science and will have applied that knowledge to a variety of problems. Graduates will have an understanding and appreciation of the context in which professional computing activities occur. Graduates will have an in-depth knowledge of a wide range of topics spanning the field of computer science Program Educational Objectives (PEO’s)

  15. Example PEO’s (CS) Graduates of the Computer Science Program will have the necessary technical knowledge and skills both in breadth and depth, to pursue the practice or advanced study of computer science. Graduates of the Computer Science Program will understand the importance of life-long learning, and be prepared to learn and understand new technological developments in their field. Graduates of the Computer Science Program will understand the ethical and technical context of their computer science contributions and their obligations therein. Graduates of the Computer Science Program will develop the communication, teamwork, and leadership skills necessary to function productively and professionally. Program Educational Objectives (PEO’s)

  16. Example PEO’s (CS) 1. Preparation for Practice: Graduates will be prepared for entry-level positions in their discipline and for graduate/professional studies. 2. Tools for Creativity: Graduate will experience the creative and design processes and their application to typical engineering situations. Societal Awareness: Graduates will receive the breadth of education necessary to integrate practice in their discipline with the interests of a diverse modern society. 4. Leadership Skills: Graduates will be prepared for leadership in their discipline. Program Educational Objectives (PEO’s)

  17. How to Involve Program Constituencies?

  18. PO’s satisfy the 11 ABET criteria PO’s must be measurable and specify an appropriate method for measurements Outcomes must specify a criterion for judging findings. satisfies professional component For academic programs, include both of the following:a. Curricular outcomesb. Learning outcomes at the course level Direct as well as indirect methods of measurement are to be used. Map PO’s into PEO’s Map PO’s into ABET “a – k” criteria Curriculum achieves PO’s Curriculum satisfies professional component Curriculum meets program specific criteria Program Outcomes (PO’s)

  19. ABET 11 Outcomes ability to apply knowledge of math, engineering, and science ability to design and conduct experiments as well as to analyze and interpret data ability to design system, component or process to meet needs ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problem understanding of professional and ethical responsibility ability to communicate effectively Broad education recognition of need and ability to engage in life-long learning knowledge of contemporary issues ability to use techniques, skills, and tools in engineering practice Program Outcomes (PO’s)

  20. Example PO’S Students understand the mathematics and statistics that underlie scientific applications. Students can design, develop, and analyze significant software systems. Students understand the fundamentals of computer organization and architecture, data structures and related algorithms, and programming languages. Students can apply computer science principles and practices to a variety of problems. Students can work independently and also work effectively in teams. Students can communicate effectively both orally and in writing. Students understand social, professional and ethical issues related to computing. Students are knowledgeable of contemporary issues in the arts, social sciences, and humanities. Students understand the scientific method and can apply this mode of inquiry in a laboratory setting. (CS Program) Students have a broad perspective of the business world. (IS&T Program) Program Outcomes (PO’s)

  21. Program Outcomes (PO's) Graduates will have a reasonable level of understanding of each of the subject areas that define the discipline as well as the interrelationships that exist among them: algorithms, architecture, artificial intelligence and robotics, data structures, database and information retrieval, human-computer interaction, operating systems, programming languages, and software engineering. Graduates will have the ability to utilize appropriate theoretical constructs: definitions, and axioms, theorems, proofs, and interpretation of results. Graduates will have the ability to utilize appropriate abstractive constructs: hypothesis formation, data collection, modeling and prediction, experimental design, and analysis of results. Graduates will have the ability to utilize appropriate design constructs: requirements analysis and specification, design, implementation, and testing. Graduates will be exposed to ethical and societal issues associated with the computing field. Graduates will be familiar with recent technological and theoretical developments, general professional standards, and have an awareness of their own strengths and limitations as well as those of the discipline itself. Graduates will be aware of the history of computing, including those major developments and trends - economic, scientific, legal, political, and cultural - that have combined to shape the discipline. Graduates will be able to appreciate the intellectual depth and abstract issues that will continue to challenge researchers in the future. They should have a strong foundation on which to base lifelong learning and development. Graduates will have the necessary background for entry into graduate study. Graduates will have the ability to communicate effectively. Program Outcomes (PO’s)

  22. Program Outcomes (PO's) The intended Educational Outcomes of the program (that support the above objectives) that the graduates of the Computer Science undergraduate program will have: Proficiency in the areas of software design and development, data structures, and operating systems 2. An ability to plan and execute an problem design to meet an identified need 3. Proficiency in mathematical and scientific principles relevant to computer science 4. An ability to communicate effectively 5. An understanding of the overall human context in which computing activities take place 6. A knowledge of contemporary issues and an ability to use modern tools and techniques in engineering practice. Program Outcomes (PO’s)

  23. Relationship of PEO’s to PO’S The relationship between the Departmental Educational Objectives and the Educational Outcomes is shown in the following table. The matrix presented in the table may appear a bit densely populated, but, in fact, all of the Educational Objectives support all of the Outcomes.

  24. Relationship of PEO’s to EC2000 Criteria

  25. What is Urgent Now? (DAC) Submit • Program’s Mission • Program’s Constituencies • Program’s Educational Objectives (PEO’s) • Program’s Outcomes (PO’s) • Tabulated Current Curriculum • Program Industrial Advisory Committee (PIAC). Faculty Submit: • ABET Course Syllabus • ABET Resume • Passport Photo (for Web Page) • Collect sample of students work this semester • Record of tests grades this semester

  26. Test # Grade Distribution

  27. WEB PAGE Contents UOB Mission COE Mission COIT Mission Programs Missions ABET Documentations CE, CHE, ET, ME CS, CEIT, MIS Programs Curriculum Program Faculty Students Information Record of All JAC/DAC & Programs Meetings Minutes On-line Employer Survey Alumni Survey Senior Exit Survey Faculty Survey Industrial Advisory Committee Final Results: Programs Self-study Reports

  28. Table of Contents A. Background Information 1. Degree Titles 2. Program Modes 3. Actions to Correct Previous Deficiencies 4. Department Culture and Administrative Structure 5. Department Constituencies and Feedback Loops 6. Examples of the Feedback Loops Working B. Accreditation Summary 1. Students 2. Program Educational Objectives 3. Program Outcomes and Assessment 4. Professional Component 5. Faculty 6. Facilities 7. Institutional Support and Financial Resources 8. Program Criteria Example Programs Self-study Reports

  29. Appendix I - Additional Program Information A. Tabular Data for Program Table A.1. Basic Curriculum Table A.2. Course and Section Size Summary Table A.3. Faculty Workload Summary Table A.4. Faculty Analysis Table A.5. Support Expenditures B. Course Syllabi C. Faculty Resumes D. Student exit survey comments for the past two years E. Alumni survey comments for the past two years F. Employer survey comments for the past two years G. Faculty survey for the past two years

  30. Accredited Computing Programs • Alabama in Huntsville, The University of Computer Science (BS) [1988] Huntsville, AL • Alabama, The University of Computer Science (BSCS) [1990] Tuscaloosa, AL  • Alaska Fairbanks, University of Computer Science (BS) [1991] Fairbanks, AK • American University in Cairo, The Computer Science (BS) [1999] Cairo, Egypt • Appalachian State University Computer Science (BS) [1988-1996;1997] Boone, NC • Arizona State University Computer Science (BS) [1992] Tempe, AZ • Arkansas at Little Rock, University of Computer Science (BS) [1990] Little Rock, AR • Armstrong Atlantic State University Computer Science (BS) [1991] Savannah, GA  • Auburn University Computer Science (BS) [1987] Auburn, AL • Baylor University Computer Science (BSCS) [1987] Waco, TX • Boise State University Computer Science (BS) [1994] Boise, ID  • Bowie State University Computer Science (BS) [1998] Bowie, MD  • Brigham Young University Computer Science (BS) [1989] Provo, UT • Bucknell University Computer Science (BS) [1991] Lewisburg, PA • Bucknell University Computer Science and Engineering (BS) [1997] Lewisburg, PA  • California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo Computer Science (BS) [1986] San Luis Obispo, CA  • California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Computer Science (BS) [1994] Pomona, CA • California State University, Chico Computer Science General, Mathematics/Science and Systems Options (BS) [1987] Chico, CA  • California State University, Dominguez Hills Computer Science (BS) [1996] Dominguez Hills, CA • California State University, Fullerton Computer Science (BS) [1988] Fullerton, CA • California State University, Long Beach Computer Science: Option in Computer Engineering (BS) [1995] Long Beach, CA  • California State University, Northridge Computer Science (BS) [1987] Northridge, CA • California State University, Sacramento Computer Science (BS) [1986] Sacramento, CA  • California State University, San Bernardino Computer Science (BS) [1990] San Bernardino, CA • California, Berkeley, University of Computer Science and Engineering (BS) [1995] Berkeley, CA • California, Davis, University of Computer Science and Engineering (BS) [1995] Davis, CA  • California, Los Angeles, University of Computer Science (BS) [1995] Los Angeles, CA  • California, Los Angeles, University of Computer Science and Engineering (BS) [1995] Los Angeles, CA • California, Santa Barbara, University of Computer Science (BA) [1986] Santa Barbara, CA  • California, Santa Barbara, University of Computer Science (BS) [1986] Santa Barbara, CA 

  31. Hampton University Computer Science (BS) [1989] Hampton, VA • Houston, University of Computer Science (BS) [1987] Houston, TX • Houston-Clear Lake, University of Computer Science (BS) [2002] Houston, TX • Howard University Systems and Computer Science (BS) [1988] Washington, DC • Idaho, University of Computer Science (Moscow and Idaho Falls) (BS) [1993] Moscow, ID • Illinois at Chicago, University of Computer Science (BS) [1997] Chicago, IL • Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of Computer Science (BS) [2002] Urbana, IL • Illinois Institute of Technology Computer Science (BS) [2003] Chicago, IL • Illinois State University Applied Computer Science, Computer Science (BS) [2000] Normal, IL • Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne Computer Science (BS) [2004] Fort Wayne, IN • Iowa State University Computer Science (BS) [1986] Ames, IA • Jackson State University Computer Science (BS) [1991-1994;1996] Jackson, MS • Kansas State University Computer Science (BS) [1992] Manhattan, KS • Kansas, The University of Computer Science (BS) [1995] Lawrence, KS • Kennesaw State University Computer Science (BS) [2004] Kennesaw, GA • Lafayette College Computer Science (BS) [2003] Easton, PA • Lamar University Computer Science (BS) [2002] Beaumont, TX • Lehigh University Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Science (BS) [1987] Bethlehem, PA • Louisiana at Lafayette, University of Computer Science/Commercial Option (BS) [1987] Lafayette, LA • Louisiana at Monroe, University of Computer Science (BS) [1987] Monroe, LA • Louisiana State University, Shreveport Computer Science (BS) [1991] Shreveport, LA • Louisiana Tech University Computer Science (BS) [1988] Ruston, LA • Louisville, University of Engineering Mathematics and Computer Science (BS) [1996] Louisville, KY • Loyola College in Maryland Computer Science (BS) [1990] Baltimore, MD • Maine, University of Computer Science (BS) [1995] Orono, ME • Maryland Baltimore County, University of Computer Science (BS) [2000] Baltimore, MD • Massachusetts Dartmouth, University of Computer Science (BS) [1988] North Dartmouth, MA • Massachusetts Institute of Technology Computer Science and Engineering (SB) [1996] Cambridge, MA • Massachusetts Institute of Technology Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (SB) [1996] Cambridge, MA • Massachusetts Lowell, University of Computer Science (BS) [1990] Lowell, MA • McNeese State University Computer Science (BS) [2001] Lake Charles, LA • Mercer University Computer Science (BS) [1998] Macon, GA • Metropolitan State College of Denver Computer Science (BS) [2004] Denver, CO • Michigan, University of Computer Science - College of Engineering (BSE) [2004] Ann Arbor, MI • Michigan, University of Computer Science - College of Literature, Science and Arts (BS) [2004] Ann Arbor, MI • Michigan-Dearborn, University of Computer and Information Science (BS) [1997] Dearborn, MI • Middle Tennessee State University Computer Science (BS) [1994] Murfreesboro, TN • Millersville University of Pennsylvania Computer Science (BS) [1999] Millersville, PA • Minnesota Duluth, University of Computer Science (BS) [1989] Duluth, MN • Mississippi State University Computer Science (BS) [1986] Mississippi State, MS • Mississippi, University of Computer Science (BSCS) [1990] University, MS • Missouri-Rolla, University of Computer Science (BS) [1986] Rolla, MO • Montana State University - Bozeman Computer Science (BS) [1993] Bozeman, MT • Montana Tech of the University of Montana Computer Science (BS) [1999] Butte, MT • Montana, University of Computer Science (BS) [1996] Missoula, MT • Montclair State University Computer Science (BS) [1993] Upper Montclair, NJ

  32. Nebraska at Omaha, University of Computer Science (BS) [2004] Omaha, NE • Nevada-Las Vegas, University of Computer Science (BS) [1993] Las Vegas, NV • Nevada-Reno, University of Computer Science (BS) [2000] Reno, NV • New Hampshire, University of Computer Science (BS) [1987] Durham, NH • New Haven, University of Computer Science (BS) [2000] West Haven, CT • New Jersey Institute of Technology Computer Science (BA) [1995] Newark, NJ • New Jersey Institute of Technology Computer Science (BS) [1986] Newark, NJ • New Jersey, College of Computer Science (BS) [1997] Ewing, NJ • New Mexico, University of Computer Science (BS) [1988] Albuquerque, NM • New Orleans, University of Computer Science (BS) [1987] New Orleans, LA • New York at Binghamton, State University of Computer Science (BS) [1989] Binghamton, NY • New York at Brockport, State University of Computer Science (BS) [1994] Brockport, NY • New York at New Paltz, State University of Computer Science (BS/BA) [1991] New Paltz, NY • New York, College of Staten Island, City University of Computer Science (BS) [1989] Staten Island, NY • Nicholls State University Computer Science (BS) [1995] Thibodaux, LA • Norfolk State University Computer Science (BS) [1991] Norfolk, VA • North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University Computer Science (BS) [1994] Greensboro, NC • North Carolina at Greensboro, University of Computer Science (BS) [1995] Greensboro, NC • North Carolina State University at Raleigh Computer Science (BS) [1987] Raleigh, NC • North Dakota State University Computer Science (BS) [1986] Fargo, ND • North Dakota, University of Computer Science (BS) [1987] Grand Forks, ND • North Florida, University of Computer and Information Sciences, Computer Science Specialization (BS) [1987] Jacksonville, FL • North Texas, University of Computer Science (BS) [1986] Denton, TX • Northeastern University Computer Science (BS) [1986] Boston, MA • Northern Arizona University Computer Science (BS) [1996] Flagstaff, AZ • Oakland University Computer Science (BS) [1988] Rochester, MI • Ohio State University, The Computer Science and Engineering (BS) [2000] Columbus, OH • Ohio University Computer Science (BSCS) [2002] Athens, OH • Oklahoma, The University of Computer Science (BS) [1997] Norman, OK • Oregon State University Computer Science: Computer Systems Option (BS) [2003] Corvallis, OR • Pace University Computer Science (BS) [1986] New York, NY • Pacific Lutheran University Computer Science (BS) [1989] Tacoma, WA • Pacific, University of the Computer Science (BS) [1990] Stockton, CA • Polytechnic University Computer Science (BS) [1988] Brooklyn, NY • Portland State University Computer Science (BS) [1994] Portland, OR • Portland, University of Computer Science (BS) [2004] Portland, OR • Prairie View A & M University Computer Science (BS) [1992] Prairie View, TX • Radford University Computer Science and Technology - Computer Science Concentration (BS) [1992] Radford, VA • Robert Morris University Information Sciences (BS) [2003] Moon Township, PA • Rochester Institute of Technology Computer Science (BS) [1989] Rochester, NY

  33. Rowan University Computer Science (BS) [2001] Glassboro, NJ Salem State College Computer and Information Studies (BS) [2004] Salem, MA San Diego State University Computer Science (BS) [1994] San Diego, CA San Francisco State University Computer Science (BS) [1993] San Francisco, CA San Jose State University Computer Science (BS) [1994] San Jose, CA Scranton, University of Computer Science (BS) [1990] Scranton, PA South Alabama, University of Computer and Information Sciences, Computer Science Specialization (BS) [1988] Mobile, AL South Alabama, University of Computer and Information Sciences, Information Systems Specialization (BS) [2003] Mobile, AL South Carolina Spartanburg, University of Computer Science (BS) [2003] Spartanburg, SC South Carolina State University Computer Science (BS) [2004] Orangeburg, SC South Carolina, University of Computer Science (BS) [1990] Columbia, SC South Dakota School of Mines and Technology Computer Science (BS) [1993] Rapid City, SD South Florida, University of Computer Science (BS) [1989] Tampa, FL Southeastern Louisiana University Computer Science (BS) [2001] Hammond, LA Southern California, University of Computer Engineering and Computer Science (BS) [2004] Los Angeles, CA Southern California, University of Computer Science (BS) [1988-1994; 2004] Los Angeles, CA Southern Connecticut State University Computer Science (BS) [1992] New Haven, CT Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville Computer Science (BS) [2003] Edwardsville, IL Southern Maine, University of Computer Science (BS) [1994] Portland, ME Southern Methodist University Computer Science (BS) [2003] Dallas, TX Southern Mississippi, University of Computer Science (BS) [1987] Hattiesburg, MS Southern University and Agricultural & Mechanical College Computer Science, Scientific Option (BS) [1989] Baton Rouge, LA Southwest Missouri State University Computer Science (BS) [1989] Springfield, MO St. Cloud State University Computer Science (BS) [1989] St. Cloud, MN Stephen F. Austin State University Computer Science (BS) [2000] Nacogdoches, TX Stevens Institute of Technology Computer Science (BS) [1986] Hoboken, NJ Syracuse University Computer Science (BS) [2000] Syracuse, NY

  34. Tennessee at Chattanooga, University of Computer Science, Scientific Option (BS) [2002] Chattanooga, TN • Tennessee at Chattanooga, University of Computer Science-IS Concentration (BS) [2002] Chattanooga, TN • Texas A & M University Computer Science (BS) [1993] College Station, TX • Texas at Arlington, University of Computer Science (BSCS) [2004] Arlington, TX • Texas at Arlington, University of Computer Science and Engineering (BS) [1995] Arlington, TX • Texas at El Paso, University of Computer Science (BS) [1988] El Paso, TX • Texas Christian University Computer Science (BS) [1990] Forth Worth, TX • Texas State University-San Marcos Computer Science (BS) [1999] San Marcos, TX • Texas-Pan American, The University of Computer Science, Broad Field Major (BSCS) [2003] Edinburg, TX • Toledo, The University of Computer Science and Engineering (BS) [1991] Toledo, OH • Towson University Computer Science (BS) [1994] Towson, MD • Tulane University Computer Science (BS) [1990] New Orleans, LA • Tulsa, The University of Computer Science (BS) [1988] Tulsa, OK • United States Air Force Academy Computer Science (BS) [1986] USAFA, CO • United States Military Academy Computer Science (BS) [1997] West Point, NY • United States Naval Academy Computer Science (BS) [1987] Annapolis, MD • Utah State University Computer Science (BS) [1998] Logan, UT • Utah Valley State College Computer Science (BS) [2003] Orem, UT • Vanderbilt University Computer Science (BS) [1998] Nashville, TN • Villanova University Computer Science in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (BS) [1991] Villanova, PA • Virginia Commonwealth University Computer Science (BS) [1988-1996;1997] Richmond, VA • Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Computer Science (BS) [1999] Blacksburg, VA • Washington State University Computer Science (Pullman, Tri-Cities) (BS) [1996] Pullman, WA • Washington State University Computer Science (Pullman, Tri-Cities, Vancouver) (BA) [2002] Pullman, WA • West Georgia, State University of Computer Science (BS) [2002] Carrollton, GA • Western Kentucky University Computer Science - Scientific Option (BS) [1993] Bowling Green, KY • Western Michigan University Computer Science (BS) [1986] Kalamazoo, MI • Western Washington University Computer Science (BS) [1987] Bellingham, WA • Winston-Salem State University Computer Science (BS) [1995] Winston-Salem, NC • Winthrop University Computer Science (BS) [1990] Rock Hill, SC • Wisconsin - Eau Claire, University of Computer Science (BS) [2001] Eau Claire, WI • Wisconsin-Oshkosh, University of Computer Science (BS) [2004] Oshkosh, WI • Worcester Polytechnic Institute Computer Science (BS) [1986] Worcester, MA • Wright State University Computer Science (BSCS) [1987-1990;1996] Dayton, OH • Wyoming, University of Computer Science (BS) [1999] Laramie, WY