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Sea Ice Extent in October

Sea Ice Extent in October

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Sea Ice Extent in October

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  1. Sea Ice Extent in October Dana White

  2. What is Arctic Sea Ice? • Frozen ocean water • Keeps the polar regions cool and helps moderate global climate

  3. Intro: • We are determining when (in what year for October) will the sea ice be completely gone. We’re addressing current conditions in the Arctic and the climate change overtime. A prediction towards when the sea ice will be completely depleted will be made using a data set from October 1979 - October 2012.

  4. Why is it important? • Thickness and extent of summer sea ice in the Arctic have shown a dramatic decline over the past thirty years • Animals in the arctic are dying and their habitats are being destroyed • Small temperature increase at the poles leads to greater warming over time • Loss of sea ice has potential to speed up global warming trends and to change climate patterns

  5. R= .816

  6. Data Set

  7. 2129 Ice Will Be Gone • 1979= 1 • 2011 = 33 • 2012 = 34 • 151.432 – 34= 117.432 • 2012+117 = • In 2129 ice will be gone Key: e= ice extent y= year • e= -0.0659y+9.9794 • 0= -0.0659y+9.9794 -9.9794 -9.9794 • -9.9794 = -0.0659y -0.0659 -0.0659 151.432 = y

  8. Domain, Range, and Slope • Domain: 1979 – 2012 • Range: 3.210 =9.98 (1982) – 6.77 (2007) • The October data set gives a negative slope of -0.0659. Meaning that as time goes on, there is less sea ice is in the Arctic region. In the future, this means there may be none if we don’t do something to stop it.

  9. 2129 • It’s too far in the future for the equation to predict accurately. It is also not the best estimate because the R-value is .816 and an accurate model would have an r-value of 1. • The data used is from the fall season so it makes sense that the predicted year is less than a century away.

  10. What We Can Do - Solution • Turn off lights and electronics when they’re not being used • Conserve water, don’t let it run for longer than it needs to be • Lower thermostats • Carpool with others, it emits fewer fossil fuels

  11. Conclusion: • Sea ice is melting overtime due to global temperatures slightly rising over time. If the problem is not addressed soon, the ice can completely melt, which would affect not only the Arctic region, but the entire globe.

  12. Works Cited • National Snow and Ice Data Center ftp://sidads.colorado.edu/DATASETS/NOAA/G02135/ • http://nsidc.org • https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1163&bih=573&q=sea+ice&oq=sea+ice&gs_l=img.3..0l7j0i5l3.1980.4299.0.4668.9.8.1.0.0.0.76.526.8.8.0...0.0...1.1.2.img.552n2_EzNNo