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Start Here

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Start Here

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  1. Start Here

  2. The information in this PowerPoint is provided to help you get started. Please note that much of the information, especially that in green, is provided as suggestions for you to include in your own courses. If you find anything below helpful, feel free to copy and paste it and/or modify it as desired.  Text on PowerPoint slides should be no smaller than 28 point. For Faculty

  3. Make sure when you enter Desire2Learn (D2L) that you run the "System Check," which you can begin by clicking the “Please click here for a System Check before you login” link. Pay attention as the System Check runs. Make sure you address any problems with your browser version, browser settings, or display settings. Taking This Course

  4. To take this course, you FIRST need to contact Dr. xxxxat xxxx@kennesaw.edu. • Some of you have already spoken with Dr. xxxx, but if you have not given Dr. xxxxyour email address, you need to do so now. Taking this course Picture of You

  5. Your instructor will respond to email at xxxx@kennesaw.edu within 24 hours during the week (M-R 9am-5pm). You may also call 678-797-xxxx or visit at the KSU campus, Social Sciences building (22), Room xxxx(5th floor). • You are encouraged to contact your instructor when you have questions. You are always welcome to visit. You may wish to call and make an appointment if you plan a visit--just so that the amount of time you think you'll need will be reserved for you. Taking this course

  6. Assignments will be graded and returned within one week of the due date. • If you haven't already done so, buy your books either at the bookstore or online at various online textbooks sellers. • Your syllabus is located under the syllabus button on this page to your left. You can also scroll down to find it. • Your schedule is located on the D2L Home Page. You can also view it by clicking the appropriate navigation button on the left. Taking This Course

  7. This section is provided as an example for you as a location in which you might provide prerequisite information for your students. Pre-reqs ARE A QM STANDARD! If you don’t have any pre-requisites, it would be helpful to put the word “none” or the sentence “there are no prerequisites for this course” here. Pre-Requisites

  8. This section is provided as an example for you as a location in which you might provide the course description (as taken from your syllabus) in the introduction to your course. Course Description

  9. Baym, Nina, Ed. The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter Seventh Edition. NY: W. W. Norton and Company, 2008. You will need access to a computer with reliable internet access and sound and video capabilities. Textbooks and Materials:

  10. Kennesaw State University provides program accessibility and reasonable accommodations for persons defined as disabled under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Kennesaw State University's Disability Support Services can be accessed at http://www.kennesaw.edu/stu_dev/dsss/dsss.html ADA Statement

  11. Students are expected to comply with KSU's academic policies, listed here: https://web.kennesaw.edu/registrar/students/academic_policy. Academic Policies

  12. At the end of the course, students should be able to name in chronological order, delineate, and provide examples of the major movements in American literature: Enlightenment, Transcendentalism, romanticism, regionalism and realism, Modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, the Southern Renaissance, and postmodernism. • At the end of the course, students should be able to define each movement, name authors from each movement, name works from each movement by the named authors, and explain how aspects of each work reflect the movement they belong to. Goals (remember, goals must be measurable; they must use verifiable verbs)

  13. Students should be able to name major themes in American literature and explain how works from each movement reflect those themes • In addition, students should be able to name, provide examples of, and describe major themes within transition writers and writers who fall outside the movements. Goals (remember, goals must be measurable; they must use verifiable verbs) Continued

  14. Students should be ale to analyze a literary work using close reading and paying attention to the context of the work. • Students should be able to explain how events in American history shape American literature, and how American literature reflects the multifaceted core of what it means to be American. Goals (remember, goals must be measurable; they must use verifiable verbs) Continued

  15. You will need basic computer skills. Can you find a web site if you are given a web address? Can you send and receive an email? Can you attach files and open attachments? If you can, then you will probably have few problems with the technology in this course. Skills and Other Things You Need

  16. You will also need regular access to a computer and Internet service. You can use the labs on campus if you buy a set of headphones. Right now, write down two backup places that you will go if your preferred email access point fails. Skills and Other Things You Need

  17. For example, if you try to get on the internet and you find your home access won't work, where will you go? Then, if during the class you have trouble, you can go to your backup place. Can you go to the local library? To the local community college? To your aunt's house?  If you have no backup places, you probably don't need to take this course. In other words, if your internet fails, it may severely hinder your progress in this class. Skills and Other Things You Need

  18. You will need an email account that you check every day, and your facilitator needs that account address. Email failures, like internet failures, can severely hinder your progress in this course. Skills and Other Things You Need

  19. English 2160 is a hybrid course. We will meet online on Tuesdays (that is, the modules will come available on Friday and be due on Tuesday at midnight. You can complete your assignment anytime between Friday at midnight and Tuesday at midnight). Your schedule will outline the topic for each module. How the Course Works

  20. For your online modules, your quizzes, course content, and assignment(s) will become visible at midnight on Friday nights. You will have until midnight on the next Tuesday to access the materials and complete any activities there. You choose when you access the content within the given time frames. You will review the materials--this activity should take about 3 hours, including download/access time. You should expect to spend about five hours per week on this course, including reviewing materials, completing activities, and working on your own web course.  How the Course Works

  21. Face to face meetings will take place in the room designated on the schedule and will last one hour and fifteen minutes. Look in for the Module 1: Online to see your video introduction to the course. How the Course Works

  22. (a concrete sample of how an internet course might progress--this information is provided for you as something you might provide for your students if you teach completely online) In this course, the class meets online on Tuesdays and face to face on Fridays. Bill's Adventures in English 2160

  23. Bill is a student in our course. He signs in by phone or email or in person with the professor before the course begins, and he gives her his email address. He also takes down the course information. Before the class begins

  24. The day classes begin, which is a Saturday, he makes sure English 2160 shows up on his Desire2Learn (D2L) site. He is ready to begin the course. Bill knows his information to get started with the course is available under Module 1: Online.  The first day of classes

  25. However, Bill works until 5pm on Mondays, so he waits until 7pm that night and accesses the D2L course site. He reads the orientation in the Start Here module (what you're reading right now) on D2L. He reads it and writes down questions for his professor, and he emails his professor with his questions. In Module1: Online, Bill finds the goals and objectives, the netiquette guidelines, the information on changing his default settings, the video lecture, and the self-assessment and discussion board assignment. The first day of classes

  26. Bill has a busy week, so he accesses the introductory materials, including the lecture, and completes the discussion board assignment to prepare for class on Friday. He also looks at what to bring for the face to face section under Module 2: Face to Face. Week 1: Thursday

  27. Bill comes to class on Friday prepared for the day. He has read and brought homework and handouts to class, as specified in Module 2: Face to Face. He takes notes in class, participates, and asks questions when he has them. He leaves class and goes to work. Week 1: Friday

  28. He reads his assignments from the syllabus on Sunday. His online module came available Friday at midnight. From the syllabus, he knows he is supposed to read Read Markel, chapter 1: "Understanding the Technical Environment" and chapter 2: "Understanding Ethical and Legal Considerations." Week 2: Sunday

  29. When he completes his reading on Sunday evening, he takes his quiz on the readings under Module 3: Online on D2L. He then completes the additional activities and listens to a recorded lecture from the professor. He knows he has until midnight on Tuesday, but he decides to go ahead and get it done. Week 2: Sunday

  30. After work on Tuesday, Bill goes bowling. So, on Wednesday night he looks in the discussion board to see what his classmates have said about themselves, and he asks a classmate named Rita about her lasagna recipe that she mentioned she was famous for. It sounds like a great recipe to have. He then accesses Module 4: Face to Face at 7pm. He takes note of what he needs to read for the face to face session, and he reads it. He writes down questions to ask in class.  He finishes this work about 8:30pm.  He goes to bed. Week 2: Wednesday

  31. Bill comes to class on Friday prepared for the day. He has read and brought homework and handouts to class, as specified in Module 4: Face to Face. He takes notes in class, participates, and asks questions when he has them. The professor assigns a research paper and presents a choice of assignments. Week 2: Friday

  32. As Bill thinks about his topic, he decides to look again at the Class Lounge. A classmate named Felipe is also a communications major, just as Bill is, so he asks Felipe via the Lounge if he has thought of any topics regarding ethics in their shared major.  And so it goes . . . Week 2: Friday

  33. The important thing to remember is stay on top of the class so that the activities and expectations don't crunch you. If you try to do everything an hour before it is due, you will find that activities, life, and technology will get in your way. As your professor, I will try to keep you updated every other week on your progress during the course. Always let your professor know if you run into difficulties. Please Note

  34. Students are expected to attend the electronic lectures and face to face classes in a timely fashion and to keep up with the course schedule. Attendance is monitored using D2L. Late assignments may or may not be accepted. If accepted, late assignments lose 10 points per day late. Day 1 of late begins after the due date and time. View the netiquette guidelines for information regarding behavioral expectations for online students. Plagiarismcarries with it penalties, including a failing grade for the course. Course Expectations (example for you)

  35. Sample schedule 1 Sample schedules

  36. Sample schedule 2 Sample schedules

  37. 1.) Your professor will respond to email at xxxx@kennesaw.edu within 24 hours during the week (M-R 9am-5pm). You may also call 678-797-xxxx or visit at the KSU campus, Social Sciences building (22), Room xxxx(5th floor). You may wish to call and make an appointment if you plan a visit--just so that the amount of time you think you'll need will be reserved for you. 2.) Assignments will be graded, and grades will be posted, within 1 week after the assignment due date. If the instructor anticipates a delay in grading, you will be notified as soon as possible. Additional Information

  38. 3.) Technical support is your responsibility. If a document or lecture does not open for you, let your facilitator know. Sometimes your facilitator can put information in a different format that you can access more easily. However, if the problem is on your end (your computer, your software, your modem), it is your responsibility to find someone on your end to help you with the problem. If you are on KSU campus, contact studenthelpdesk@kennesaw.edu. Your facilitator is not technical support. Again, please let your facilitator know if you have any questions. Additional Information

  39. QM also requires that you list your grading scale and how you will grade, including rubrics and, when possible, sample assignments. You should also include directions that assist a student in figuring his or her grade. See the next page for an example. Grading

  40. How to Calculate Your Grade

  41. It’s good to end your “Start Here” presentation by telling students what to do next. This presentation was created by Dr. Vanessa Slinger-Friedman, 2012. What Next?