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Simon’s Cat or Why I have a black eye some days

Simon’s Cat or Why I have a black eye some days

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Simon’s Cat or Why I have a black eye some days

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  1. Simon’s Cat or Why I have a black eye some days http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w0ffwDYo00Q

  2. Breeds and Terminology Dr. N. Matthew Ellinwood, D.V.M., Ph.D. January 23, 2013 Iowa State University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

  3. Objectives • Terminology specific to dogs and cats • Sex, external anatomy, etc. • Breeds and breed history • Registries, class within registries, etc. • Coat color, body types, etc specific to dogs and cats • Examples of breeds • Introduction to cat and dog showing

  4. Terminology • Canine • Male Dog, Sire, Stud • Female Bitch, Dam • Young Pup, litter • Parturition Whelp • Feline • Male Tom • Female Queen • Young Kitten, litter • Parturition Queening, Kindling

  5. History of the Domestic Dog • Domesticated ~ 30-15,000 years ago • Domestic dogs no longer seeing admixture of wolf genetics • Likely coincidental with the development of animal agricuture • ~8-9,000 years ago • “Types” emerge as early as 4,500 years ago

  6. History of the Domestic Dog • Fossil remains identify five distinct types (not breeds) of early domestic dogs - c. 4500 BC: • Mastiff types * • Wolf-like types * • Greyhound types # • Sheepdog types * • Pointer types * • * genetic data support grouping • # genetically grouped with Sheepdogs

  7. Mastiff type dogs Originated from large wolves from sub-arctic regions

  8. Wolf type dogs Wolf like dogs with erect ears, curling tails, including sled dogs, asian lap dogs, and basenjis

  9. Lapphund

  10. Iceland Dog

  11. Greyhound type dogs • Sight hounds • Dolicocephalic (their head shape)

  12. Pointer type dogs Medium sized hunting dog, ancestral to many European Breeds

  13. Sheepdog type

  14. Intro to History of Dog Breeds • Most modern breeds established ~200-100 years ago • Breed development: Regional Types • crossbreeding &/or inbreeding of regional types • standardize color, physical characteristics, behavior, function • closed genetic pool • Breed development: Created Breeds • Examples include Doberman and Bull Mastiff • Today, ~400 distinct dog breeds world-wide

  15. Definition of “Breed” • Domestic race of dogs that is selected and maintained by humans with a common gene pool and a characterized appearance and function. (AKC)

  16. Modern Dog Breeds • No universal standards - specific standards for each breed • Modern dog breeds defined by “Breed Standards” • In US, standards and registration typically governed by the American Kennel Club (AKC) • Some exceptions to AKC • For many traits, great amount of variability within breeds

  17. Groupings of Dog Breeds • Grouped for show purposes • “Function” based • Sporting Group (Gundogs) • Hound Group • Terrier Group • Non-Sporting Group (Utility) • Working Group • Herding Group • Toy Group

  18. Toy Group • Purpose: pets, foot warmers in Medieval times • Disposition: friendly, protective • Physical characteristics: small size • Some toy breeds are miniatures • Italian greyhounds • Pomeranian - Spitz type • Pug - Mastiff type • Likely, others are distinct • Japanese Chin

  19. Toy Group Breeds From: The Ultimate Dog Book

  20. Toy Group Breeds From: The Ultimate Dog Book

  21. Working Group • Purpose: sled, rescue, draft, herding, guard • Disposition: typically intelligent, some can be aggressive/protective • Physical characteristics: typically large size

  22. Working Group Breeds From: The Ultimate Dog Book

  23. Herding Group • Purpose: herding and guard • Disposition: typically intelligent, some can be aggressive/protective • Physical characteristics: typically medium to large size • Corgi types may be true dwarfs

  24. Herding Group Breeds

  25. Non-Sporting (Utility) Group • Purpose: varied • Disposition: varied • Physical characteristics: varied • Breeds that do not fit in other groupings

  26. Non-Sporting Group Breeds

  27. Terrier Group • Name derived from Latin “terra” • Developed in Britain • Purpose: hunt by digging and routing out burrowing animals like badgers, rats, rabbits, and foxes • Disposition: alert and spirited • Physical characteristics: generally small, powerful dogs; strong mouths • Two types: smooth and rough-coated

  28. Terrier Group Breeds

  29. Terrier Group Breeds

  30. Hound Group • Purpose: hunt game • Disposition: varied • Physical characteristics: varied • Three types: • sight or gaze hounds - acute eyesight, often tall with long strides - afghan, greyhound • scent hounds - acute sense of smell - bloodhound • sight & scent hounds - beagle

  31. Hound Group Breeds

  32. Hound Group Breeds

  33. Sporting (Gundog) Group • Purpose: hunter assistants; find, retrieve game • Disposition: intelligent • Physical characteristics: medium build, keen nose • Three types: • spaniels - flush game • pointers & setters - find and “mark” game • retrievers - retrieve game

  34. Sporting Group Breeds

  35. Sporting Group Breeds

  36. How Breeds Developed • National Breed Clubs • Established in 19th century • Standard appearance • Record keeping • Exhibiting • Mechanism for evaluation

  37. Example of Breed Development • Large German gun dogs • Germany united in 1871 after Franco-Prussian war • Various dogs which were likely interbred became separate by virtue of: • Color • Hair coat quality • Region

  38. German shorthair pointer • German wirehair pointer • German longhaired pointer • Large Munsterlander • Weimaraner • Longhaired Weimaraner • Wirehaired Weimaraner