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Psy 260: Survey in Cognition and Perception

Psy 260: Survey in Cognition and Perception

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Psy 260: Survey in Cognition and Perception

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  1. Psy 260: Survey in Cognition and Perception Dr. Susan Brennan

  2. Psy 260: Cognition & Perception Graduate TAs Luciane Pereira-Pasarin Vera Hau Undergrad TA: Rachel Turetsky • Syllabus, supplementary materials, announcements, and updated information will be posted on Blackboard. • http://blackboard.sunysb.edu

  3. Using Blackboard • Your Blackboard user ID is the same as your Net ID. • Find your ID from your SOLAR account. Under Personal Portfolio, go to link: "Get Your NetID". (It's often, but not always, your first initial and first 7 letters of your last name.) • Password: your SBU ID number (or whatever you’ve changed it to).

  4. Required Texts • Reed, Cognition: Theory and Applications (6th Ed.) • Francis et al., CogLab (classic experiments, simulated)

  5. Exams • Two midterms, each covering a different part of the course: Oct 24th, Dec 12th. • Final Exam (cumulative): 12/19 5 PM • No make-up or alternative times. Check your calendar now!

  6. Simulated Experiments (CogLab) • Nine individual experiments (you choose from a set of related expts). You run yourself as a subject and collect your own data. • Interpret your data. If your data don't match the classic results, explain what you think led to the unusual pattern. • Print out your data and turn in the paper copy by the deadline.

  7. Grading • Higher midterm score 100 pts possible • Final exam 100 pts possible • 9 CogLabs 90 pts possible • Pop quizzes for extra credit You are expected to attend class and to take both midterms. Slide 0

  8. What does psychology mean to you?

  9. "Cognitive psychology refers to all processes by which the sensory input is transformed, reduced, elaborated, stored, recovered, and used." (Ulrich Neisser, 1967)

  10. Cognitive Psychology • Clinical Psychology • Social/Health Psychology • Personality Psychology • Biopsychology

  11. Nature vs. Nurture Kant: the skeptic Scientific psychology (A whirlwind history)

  12. Nature vs. Nurture Kant: the skeptic Structuralism H. von Helmholtz Wundt: introspection Hermann Ebbinghaus Scientific psychology (A whirlwind history)

  13. Structuralism • Late 1800s • Goal: Find fundamental elements of thought. • Method: Introspection. • Problem: Introspection is limited to current, mid-level cognitive processes. And it's biased.

  14. Nature vs. Nurture Kant: the skeptic Structuralism H. von Helmholtz Wundt: introspection Hermann Ebbinghaus Functionalism W. James: the critic Scientific psychology (A whirlwind history)

  15. Nature vs. Nurture Kant: the skeptic Structuralism H. von Helmholtz Wundt: introspection Hermann Ebbinghaus Functionalism W. James: the critic Gestalt psychology Scientific psychology (A whirlwind history)

  16. Nature vs. Nurture Kant: the skeptic Structuralism H. von Helmholtz Wundt: introspection Hermann Ebbinghaus Functionalism W. James: the critic Gestalt psychology Behaviorism John Watson B. F. Skinner Scientific psychology (A whirlwind history)

  17. Behaviorism • Early & Mid 1900s • Goal: Eliminate explanations based on the mind. • Method: Study behavior. Learning is defined as a change in behavior. • But is that all there is?

  18. Nature vs. Nurture Kant: the skeptic Structuralism H. von Helmholtz Wundt: introspection Hermann Ebbinghaus Functionalism W. James: the critic Gestalt psychology Behaviorism John Watson B. F. Skinner Cognitive Revolution George Miller Donald Broadbent Allen Newell Herb Simon Piaget Chomsky Scientific psychology (A whirlwind history)

  19. Cognitive Psychology (that’s us) • 1950s onward • Input  Processing  Output • Person responds to stimulus as he or she interprets it. • Method: We study behavior, assuming that it reflects cognition.

  20. Cognitive Neuroscience Figure 1.3 (p. 9)Source: Adapted from Biological Psychology (5th ed.), by J. W. Kalat.

  21. Human information processing • Perception • Attention • Memory (sensory, STM, LTM) • “Higher level” processes - Language - Mental imagery - Categorization - Problem solving - Reasoning - Judgment

  22. Figure 1.1 (p. 3)Stages of an information-processing model

  23. Bottom-up processing

  24. Top-down processing

  25. Human information processing • Perception • Attention • Memory (sensory, STM, LTM) • “Higher level” processes - Language - Mental imagery - Categorization - Problem solving - Reasoning - Judgment