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Observing the Obvious

Observing the Obvious

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Observing the Obvious

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  1. Observing the Obvious Authentic Math Assessments for Young Children

  2. What the Experts Say • National Council of Teachers of Mathematics “Assessment should support the learning of important mathematics and furnish useful information to both teachers and students.” • National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)

  3. 2 Types of Informal Assessment • Anecdotal Notes • Portfolio Work Samples Photography

  4. Anecdotal Notes • Observation of a child’s actions over time • Not just for assessment • Focus on the process and the product • Contains specific behaviors, not opinions • Beneficial for ELL students • Helps develop instruction to meet individual needs • Shows patterns of growth • Observe, Reflect, Plan – teacher move

  5. Portfolios • “Tells the story of a student’s effort, progress, or achievement” (Preschool Policy Matters, July 2004) • Provide credible and meaningful evidence of a student’s learning • Work samples are not “best” work of a student. They are documents showing the process and product of curriculum objectives. • Student input is valuable • Offers a record of learning over time • Allows comparisons of growth for a student

  6. Picturing Growth

  7. More Growth. . .More Pictures

  8. More Pictures

  9. Work Samples

  10. Work Samples

  11. Work Samples

  12. Use Assessment to Drive Instruction We all agree: • Children are unique • Children develop at different rates • Children learn differently • Brains have optimal windows open for developmental stages • It takes WORK to differentiate instruction!

  13. Ways to Differentiate Instruction

  14. Differentiating Instruction

  15. Differentiating Instruction